History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 50, No. 3, March

Alexandria's Library Rides Again
IT WAS IN 331 BC that Alexander the Great founded a naval base in Egypt that would forever bear his name. But it was under Alexander's successor, Ptolemy I, that Alexandria really began to flower. Ptolemy made the city his capital and it was soon an...
A Life in Art
Harriet Bridgeman describes how a simple idea led her to found one of the world's most prestigious libraries of art. I SEE MY LIFE, in common, I suspect, with most people, as not having had one blindingly significant point of departure but rather...
Archaeology in Albania after Kosovo
NOVEMBER 1998 MARKED the fiftieth anniversary of the Albanian Institute of Archaeology. Enver Hoxhe, Albania's post-war Communist dictator, formerly opened a prototype Institute in 1948 and appointed its first director. With Soviet support the Institute...
Arthur Evans Begins to Dig in Crete
March 23rd, 1900 In Greek mythology the island of Crete was the birthplace of the supreme god Zeus, the domain of the revered royal law-giver Minos, and the home of the Minotaur, the monstrous man-headed bull that lurked at the centre of the Cretan...
Atom Spy Klaus Fuchs Jailed
March 1st, 1950 The German-born, British atomic scientist Klaus Fuchs was thirty-eight when, under the Official Secrets Act, he was found guilty of betraying atomic secrets to Soviet agents. The judicial process was rapid in dealing with him: Fuchs...
Benjamin Franklin an American in London
Esmonds Wright recalls the life of the American philosophers, scientist and man of letters in his years in a street near Charing Cross. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, a poorly-educated Boston boy who ran away from home to find his fortune in Philadelphia as...
Birth of Caroline Herschel
March 16th, 1750 Prospects seemed dreary for young Caroline Herschel, born in Hanover 250 years ago this month, when her father said that, since she lacked either beauty or wealth, she could forget marriage. Apparently all that remained for her...
Britain Ad 1000
Ann Williams describes the state, of the island at a time when Anglo-Saxon culture was reaching its peak, while also politically challenged by the Vikings. `THE KING WENT into Cumberland and ravaged very nearly all of it; and his ships went out...
Hungary's Battle for Memory
John Mason describes the convoluted way in which Hungary has publicly celebrated its history through all the vicissitudes of its recent past. THE PEST SIDE of the river Danube that slices through Budapest is dominated by one of the largest parliament...
Letters
Christmas Time I found the article on the calendar changes of 1752 (`Making Up for Lost Time', December 1999) most interesting and the changes have odd consequences even today. The fiscal year of the Government of Canada still begins on April 1st...
Parting of the Ways
Lucy Chester examines the processes by which the Indo-Pakistan border was drawn, dividing a single country into two. IN EARLY JULY 1947, Sir Cyril Radcliffe, a British lawyer, arrived in Delhi to chair the Boundary Commissions that would partition...
Propaganda and the Perons
Clive Foss describes the propaganda effort that the Argentinian dictators made to win the gratitude and affection of the entire populace. LITTLE CACHITO, eight years OLD, sat sadly on the corner watching the other boys play football. He couldn't...
Round and About: March 2000
London British Archaeological Association Lecture March 1st Society of Antiquaries of London Burlington House Piccadilly London WIV 0HS Tel: 020 7734 0193 Jerry Sampson, Tim Ayers and Eddie Sinclair deliver this afternoon's lecture on `Salisbury...
Screen Saving
ENGLISH HERITAGE'S GENERIC SURVEY of surviving cinema buildings last year resulted in a proposal to list thirty more examples as being of special architectural or historic interest and to invite the public to submit further cases for consideration....
The Public Record Office
Anne Crawford describes Britain's national archive of official documents, and the ways in which it is developing to meet the changing needs of its users. FEW HISTORIANS, PROFESSIONAL OR AMATEUR, are unaware of the Public Record Office (PRO), the...
The Transatlantic Telegraph Cable
EIGHTH WONDER OF THE WORLD Gillian Cookson describes how the first physical link across the Atlantic was finally achieved. IN 1858 A TELEGRAM of ninety-eight words from Queen Victoria to President James Buchanan of the United States opened a...
Truth, Memory and Justice in Milan
John Foot describes the background to a trial that threatens to clarify an obscure and ignoble chapter in Italy's recent past. ON DECEMBER 12TH, 1969, a bomb exploded in a bank in Milan's city centre. The Banca Nazionale dell'Agricoltura in Piazza...