History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 52, No. 11, November

400 Years of the Bodleian Library. (Frontline)
ON NOVEMBER 8th, the Bodleian Library in Oxford will celebrate the 400th anniversary of its opening. Refounded in 1602 on the site of the earlier university library, it has since 1604 borne by royal decree the name of the remarkable man whose endowment...
Ancient History and archaeology.(bibliography)(Bibliography)
THERE'S BEEN A LOT OF DEBATE over the year as to whether or not the much-vaunted wave of interest in history has spilled out of the television screen into publishing (or at least moved beyond the small number of heavily promoted best-sellers to...
Boniface VIII's Bull Unam Sanctam. (Months Past)
CARDINAL BENEDICT Gaetani, a canon lawyer and diplomat from a leading Roman family who had spent many years working his way up in the papal government, was chosen pope in 1294 to replace the elderly Celestine V, a saintly former hermit who found...
Early Modern Britain and Europe.(bibliography)(Bibliography)
Tracing the period of rebellions in Cornwall from 1497 to 1648, West Britons: Cornish Identities and the Early Modern British State by Mark Stoyle (University of Exeter Press, [14.99 [pounds sterling]) examines those who revolted and their perceptions...
General history.(Bibliography)(Bibliography)
Covering the broadest possible period, The History of Europe: From Ancient Civilisation to the Dawn of the Third Millennium, general editor Dr John Stevenson (Mitchell Beazley, 35 [pounds sterling]), scrutinises the processes and individuals involved...
Gibraltar: Apple of Discord: As Gibraltar Conducts a Referendum on Its Future, Martin Murphy Shows the Degree to Which Its Status Was Determined by Rivalries between the 18th-Century Great Powers. (Cross Current)
RECENTLY DECLASSIFIED documents have revealed that thirty years ago the Foreign Office was debating various proposals aimed at ending the long-standing dispute with Spain over the status of Gibraltar. One of the ideas mooted was to cede sovereignty...
Gustav Stresemann: Weimar's Greatest Statesman: Jonathan Wright Looks at the Career of the Statesman Who Might Have Steered Germany Safely through the Weimar Era
GUSTAV STRESEMANN BECAME Chancellor of Germany in August 1923 at a time when it seemed as though the state was about to break up in chaos. With the French occupying the Ruhr coalfield, the mark suffering hyper-inflation to the point where it ceased...
History Books of the Year: The View from waterstone's.(Critical Essay)
SOME BOOKS OR AUTHORS COME TO DOMINATE SALES in a genre so completely that a lasting change results. Anthony Beevor is close to achieving this now. His book Berlin: The Downfall 1945 has sold more than twice the number of any other history book...
Letters to the Editor: Judith Knelman Uses Correspondence Columns to Illuminate Changing Views on Marriage in the Second Half of the Nineteenth Century. (Cross Current)
LONG BEFORE advice columns, phone-in radio or talk TV shows, the Daily Telegraph sponsored a string of open debates on marriage through its letters to the editor columns. The Marriage Question, as it was called, was much considered during the last...
London before London. (Frontline).(Museum of London Exhibit)
AS THE MUSEUM OF LONDON launches its new Prehistory Gallery, its recently appointed Director, Jack Lohman, gives us his perspective on the challenges of bringing the distant past to life. Mr Lohman, a born Londoner, joined the Museum in August,...
Plan of Campaign. (Letters).(Brief Article)
I read with great interest Terence Zuber's article The Schlieffen Plan, Fact or Fantasy? (September 2002). His thesis was that the German High Command never intended a pre-emptive strike through Belgium with a deep penetration of France in the first...
Self-Published history.(bibliography)(Bibliography)
A GROWING NUMBER OF AUTHORS find that, for one reason or another, they cannot locate--or do not want--a suitable commercial publisher for their work. So they opt to publish it themselves. For those considering taking this path, the advice on the...
Shifting Perspectives on the Great Rebellion: Austin Woolrych Reflects on How Historians' Approaches to the Events of 1640-60 Have Been Changing over the Half Century That He Has Been Working on the Period
WHEN THE EDITOR HEARD that I had recently completed a blockbuster which attempts to tell the general reader what the commotions in England, Scotland and Ireland between 1637 and 1660 were all about, and how they interacted, he suggested that I might...
Softback biography.(Critical Essay)
JUST AS BIOGRAPHY -- even the heavyweight door-stopping volumes that run through a long, heavily documented life week by week--seems to offer a `way in' to history for people who rarely pick up a more broadly-based historical volume, so the pocket...
State Opening of the New Houses of Parliament: November 11th, 1852. (Months Past)
WHEN QUEEN Victoria as crowned in Westminster Abbey in 1837 most of the palace of Westminster was still a blackened wreck after a catastrophic fire three years before. The competition to rebuild the ancestral home of parliament in the Gothic or...
Streamlining Shopping: Louise Curth, Gareth Shaw and Andrew Alexander Explain How the British Supermarket Was Born. (Cross Current)
SHOPPING FOR FOOD in supermarkets is such an everyday part of life that, for many people, it is hard to imagine a time when such shops did not exist. There are many older people, however, who remember when most groceries were sold in small, simple...
The 18th century.(bibliography)(Bibliography)
Marking the 250th anniversary of one of the most famous cultural and historic institutions in the world, The British Museum: A History by David M. Wilson (British Museum Press, 35 [pounds sterling])is an account of the curators, buildings and collections...
The Americas.(bibiliography)(Bibliography)
Encyclopedia of Native American Wars and Warfare edited by William B. Kessel & Robert Wooster (Facts on File Inc, 54.50 [pounds sterling]) details the conflicts and antagonists that helped shape North America from Columbus to the 19th century....
The Early 20th century.(Bibliography)
Savages and Beasts: The Birth of the Modern Zoo by Nigel Rothfels (Johns Hopkins, 26 [pounds sterling]) shows how current zoos evolved from Carl Hagenbeck's early 20th-century animal parks. Deforesting the Earth: From Prehistory to Global Crisis...
The Fabrication of Madame De Pompadour: Colin Jones Discusses the Art and Artifice of the Leading Mistress of Louis XV
`THE ROYAL MISTRESS'S way of thinking is serious business in this country.' It is unclear whether Prince von Kaunitz, Austrian ambassador at the French court in the early 1750s, was most struck by the quasi-institutional status of the mistress of...
The Great War: Television History Revisited. (Frontline).(Television Program Review)
AT A TIME WHEN TELEVISION-HISTORIANS are among the highest paid performers on the small screen, and when television history has been called the new cookery, it is magnificent to be able to see again one of the first great examples of the genre....
The Lost City of Cambay. ((Frontline).(India)
AN INNOCUOUS PIECE OF WOOD and a slew of other artefacts might just be set to push back Indian antiquity to 7500Bc, if material picked up from the seabed of the Gulf of Cambay gets scientific verification. The findings follow the accidental unearthing...
The Medieval world.(bibliography)(Bibliography)
Starting from the end of the Roman Empire, Women in Early Medieval Europe, 400-1100 by Lisa M. Bitel (Cambridge University Press, hb 37.50 [pounds sterling], pb 13.95 [pounds sterling]) provides a history of the early middle ages through the eyes...
The Nineteenth century.(Bibliography)
The Battle of Copenhagen 1801 by Ole Feldbaek (Pen & Sword, 19.95 [pounds sterling]) charts the British naval triumph over the Danish fleet and the legends surrounding Nelson's involvement. The Peninsular Years by Donald S. Richards (Pen &...
The Post-War world.(bibliography)(Bibliography)
Reinhold Niebuhr and Non-Utopian Liberalism: Beyond Illusion and Despair by Eyal Naveh (Sussex Academic Press, 45 [pounds sterling]) explores the ideas of a Christian theological minister whose teachings had a impact in the 1940s and 50s. American...
The Search for the Real 007. (Frontline)
SIDNEY REILLY the man said to have been the inspiration for James Bond, was one of the most complex and remarkable characters in the twentieth-century history of espionage and the creator of a personal myth that still exerts a powerful grip on the...
The Second World war.(bibliography)(Bibliography)
Mussolini, by R.J.B. Bosworth (Arnold, 9.99 [pounds sterling]) is a comprehensive account of the career of the Italian Fascist, and presents him not as a monster or a joke, but as an embodiment of his country, class, gender and age. Now available...
The St Brice's Day Massacre: November 13th, 1002. (Months Past)
WHY ST BRICE BECAME so popular in glo-Saxon England is a mystery. A Gaulish cleric of the fourth century, he succeeded St Martin as Bishop of Tours and behaved so badly that he was driven out of his diocese, but he changed his ways and was greatly...
Thomas Gainsborough: Artist of a Changing World: Michael Rosenthal and Martin Myrone Look beyond the Traditional View of Gainsborough and Argue for a View of the Painter beyond That of Society Portraitist, as a Modernist Responding to the Broader Themes of His Times. (Gainsborough)
THOMAS GAINSBOROUGH is one of Britain's best-loved artists. His portraits appear to conjure up a lost world of Georgian elegance and his landscapes to embody an enduring vision of the English countryside as rural idyll. If we were to believe Gainsborough,...
Wellington, Toryism and the Nation: T.A. Jenkins Discusses the Political Career of the Iron Duke
ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY years ago, on November 18th, 1852, an estimated 1.5 million people, in London witnessed the memorable spectacle of the public funeral of the First Duke of Wellington, the `Iron Duke' (1769-1852). His funeral carriage, a lavishly...
Who Dares Wins: Historians Have Famously Been Divided into Parachutists and Truffle-Hunters. M.R.D. Foot Explains How He Began His Careeer as a Real Parachutist in the SAS. (Point of Departure)
ON FEBRUARY 17TH, 1937, Major-General A.P.--later Field-Marshal Earl--Wavell came down to his old school to talk. He was the best educated, though not the luckiest, commander on either side in the mid-twentieth-century world war that was already...