History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 50, No. 7, July

400 Years of the East India Company
Huw V. Bowen asks whether the East India Company was one of the `most powerful engines' of state and empire in British history. THE YEAR 2000 MARKS THE 400th anniversary of the founding of the English East India Company, the trading organisation...
A Certain June 18th
AT THIS TIME OF YEAR the Paris district of Montparnasse, dominated by the huge 1970s tower which bestrides the railway station, has a special significance for the French. It evokes a national memory sixty years old this year. On the square in front...
Britain 1400
Nigel Saul tells how, in, spite of famines and visitations of the plague, conditions were better than ever before for those living in 1400. AT THE END of the fourteenth century the British Isles were a land transformed. At the beginning of the century...
Bronze-Age Ship with Cargo Fit for a King
A UNIQUE ARCHAEOLOGICAL TREASURE, recovered from the Mediterranean coast of Turkey, will soon be on display for the first time at the Museum of Underwater Archaeology at Bodrum, Turkey. The find, made in 1982, is a treasure ship that sank at the height...
Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act
July 9th, 1900 The period between 1850 and 1900 was crucial for Australia's development. It was no longer a penal colony. After the sensational gold discoveries of 1851 there was a steady influx of middle-class professional immigrants and skilled...
Death of Sir Robert Peel
July 2nd, 1850 Robert Peel was sixty-two when he died. He had sat in the Commons for more than forty years and had held high office many times. As Home Secretary in 1829 he had created the 'Peelers' or 'Bobbies', the country's first efficient police...
For God & Country Why Men Joined Up for the Us Civil War
In a conflict fought largely by volunteers, Susan-Mary Grant looks at the motivations of ordinary citizens to fight their fellow Americans under either the Union or Confederate flags. THE WORLD WARS OF THE twentieth century prompted many individuals...
Geoffrey Hosking
Daniel Snowman meets the historian of Russia and its peoples. WHEN I FIRST MET GEOFFREY Hosking in the 1970s, he was a lecturer in History at the University of Essex but his current enthusiasm was Russian literature. Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky? No,...
Letters
Shifting Memories With respect to John Mason's essay on Hungary published in the March issue of History Today, I would like to make the following observations. Perhaps the most serious issue, which seems to be pivotal to Mr Mason's thesis, is...
News
Campaigners in Chester are trying to halt building on the site of Britain's largest Roman amphitheatre to allow excavation. Developers say the structure, dating from around AD70, will not suffer unduly following the demolition of the current Georgian...
Riding High
Simon Craig discovers that drug abuse in professional sport goes back more than a hundred years. PROFESSIONAL CYCLING, LIKE athletics, has been ravaged with accusations of drug abuse in recent years. The phenomenon is not a new one, and many historians...
Tale of Two Libraries
Moving Germany's capital from Bonn to Berlin is proving every bit as complex as originally anticipated. Initiated in time to mark, in November 1999, the tenth aniversary of the Wall's collapse, it has emphasised the fundamental changes that transformed...
Thailand's MODERNISING MONARCHS
IN THE DAYS BEFORE GLOBAL tourism, Thailand was for many in the West a faraway country of which they knew little. Siam, to use the country's pre-war name, conjured up images of imperious cats, white elephants, conjoined twins and oriental despots....
The Killing of Jack Cade
July 12th, 1450 Through the haze of government propaganda, it is not possible to say with confidence who exactly Jack Cade was. According to the hostile official line, he was a man of low origins, born in Ireland, who murdered a woman in Sussex...
Trials and Tribulations
Ludovic Kennedy tells how an early introduction to British law set him on a path devoted to campaigning for justice. FOR ME THERE WERE two points of departure, the general and the specific. The general was that, while my routine studies at Eton...
Who Started Korea?
On the 50th anniversary of the outbreak of war, Paul Wingrove looks at the roles of Stalin, Mao and Kim Il Sung. On June 25th, 1950, Communist North Korea launched an invasion across the 38th Parallel into South Korea. Initially taken aback, the...
Wine & Adulteration
Rod Phillips explains why, in spite of the reputation of old vintages, most wine consumed in the past would not have suited modern palates. LOOK FOR A THEME that runs through modern wine advertising and you'll soon come up with history. For, whether...