History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 51, No. 3, March

Artists in the London Landscape
THESE DAYS, as soon as an area becomes known as `arty', estate agents rub their hands in glee, house prices go up, and artists are often forced to move on. But this was not always the pattern. Why artists have congregated in certain areas, and what...
Compass at the British Museum
www.thebritishmuseum.ac.uk/compass Designed to complement the shifts in function and identity at the British Museum with the opening of the Great Court last December, this online resource aims to allow visitors to explore the museum's extensive...
Death of Frederick Prince of Wales
March 20th, 1751 HOW FREDERICK LOUIS, the eldest son of George II and Queen Caroline, came to meet his death, a few weeks after his forty-fourth birthday, is not quite certain. A keen games player, he was struck hard by a ball when playing cricket,...
Epic Encounters
Geoff Metzger, head of The History Channel in the UK, describes a youth well spent at the movies. WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG I lived in a small town called Kyrenia, now part of Turkish Cyprus. We lived there because my father was attached to a CIA listening...
Expanding the War Rooms
NOT ONLY DID WINSTON CHURCHILL know his history but he was well aware of the part he himself played in it. His comment that it would be best to `leave the past to history, especially as I propose to write that history' was only partly made tongue in...
Forgery or Genuine Document?
Angus Mitchell shows that new scientific methods are sometimes unable to settle old historical controversies. THE PRACTICE OF FORGERY has a long tradition in the realms of both law and history. Forgery is a way by which reputations can be made or...
From Greenland's Icy Mountains
to India's coral strand, Ann Savours describes the journeys and motivations of geographer and historian Sir Clements Markham. CLEMENTS ROBERT MARKHAM was born in the Yorkshire village of Stillingfleet on July 20th, 1830, the son of the Reverend...
George IV and Posterity
Steven Parissien looks at posthumous assessments of George IV and his reign -- and finds the king's historical reputation falls short of the image he sought to project. NEVER IN MODERN TIMES has a sovereign died so unlamented, nor the person of...
History in the Media
News The Russian government has officially admitted the `unjustifiable arrest' and murder of Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg, more than fifty years after his disappearance. Wallenberg and his driver, Vilmos Langfelder, vanished shortly after Soviet...
History Uncovered
EVEN FOR NON-SPECIALISTS, there is nothing like original documents to get `inside' the decisive events of the past, to discover the character of what happened, moment by moment. Uncovered Editions is a popular and academically acclaimed series of paperbacks,...
Low and the Dictators
Timothy Benson assesses Hitler's irritated reaction to being lampooned by David Low of the Evening Standard. Sir David Low (1891-1963) was probably the most celebrated political cartoonist of the last century. He is best remembered today for the...
Murder of Tsar Paul I
March 24th, 1801 PAUL I OF RUSSIA was the son and successor of Catherine the Great, who took the Romanov throne away from her feeble-minded husband, Tsar Peter III, and had him killed in 1762, an event which ever afterwards preyed on the mind of...
Our Genealogical Forebears
Simon Fowler shows that the work of today's genealogists is infused with a more democratic ethos than that of the Victorian and Edwardian pioneers. In the autumn of 1895 Colonel William Shipway engaged a young man, Herbert Davies, to trace his pedigree....
Stonehenge
HOW DID THE STONES GET THERE? Aubrey Burl explains how the myth of the stones transported from south Wales to Salisbury Plain arose, and why it is wrong. HISTORY IS FULL OF ENJOYABLE myths but Stonehenge has too many. They mutate. Hardly had...
The Aubrac Controversy
Hanna Diamond and Claire Gorrara examine recent debates over resistance to the German occupation of France. MEMORIES OF THE SECOND World War continue to make headlines in France and never so controversially as in the cases of Maurice Papon and Raymond...
The Poisons Affair
Reggie Oliver looks at the links between some of the highest-placed women in Louis XIV's court and some notorious Parisian dealers in drugs, death and the dark arts. IN THE ARCHIVES OF THE Bastille there is a scrap of paper simply dated 1673 which...
The Sack of Damascus
March 24th, 1401 THE CENTRAL CHARACTER of Christopher Marlowe's bloodthirsty and hugely popular drama Tamburlaine the Great, in which the fall of Damascus is a major episode, was the savage Turkic warlord the Persians called Timur Lenk (Timur the...