History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 53, No. 1, January

Bethlehem 2002. (Frontline)
THE YEAR 2002 will go down in history as an eventful year for the little town of Bethlehem and its ancient Church of the Nativity. The church endured an armed siege that lasted thirty-nine days. It was the only time in its history, which dates back...
Black Pudding: Jeremy Black, One of the Most Prolific Historians of Our Time, Explains the Energy Behind His Perpetual-Motion Pen. (Point of Departure)
PLUM PUDDING not parallelogram: I can see no particular structure or pattern that led towards my interest in history or an academic career, but rather an interaction of personality and circumstances amongst which a few points stand out. First, a love...
Exploring Terra Australis: Peter Monteath Recalls What Happened When Two Explorers, Whose Nations Were Battling for Supremacy, Met on the Other Side of the World
TWO CENTURIES AGO Napoleon Bonaparte held much of Europe in thrall. He was not yet Emperor--that came in 1804--but even as a military commander and then as First Consul, Napoleon had elevated France to a formidable military power and prime rival of...
Football, Fainting and Fatalities: 1923-1946: John Walton Looks at the Hidden Problems of Crowd Safety off the Pitch in England in the First Half of the Twentieth Century. (Sport & Society)
QUESTIONS OF CROWD SAFETY at football matches in the first half of the twentieth century have received little attention. Yet tragedies occurred, notably at Ibrox in 1902 (when terraces collapsed, killing twenty-six and injuring 500) and Hillsborough...
Generalship: David Chandler Considers What Qualities a Top Soldier Needs to Be a Winner. (Cross Current)
`A COUNTRY', the saying goes, `gets the government (and the army) it deserves'. Fortunately, in Britain's case, it frequently gets a better military than it strictly merits. A few years ago an opinion poll declared that the. Armed Forces emerged as...
Henry Plantagenet Arrives in England: January 6th, 1153. (Months Past)
WHEN A surfeit of lampreys carried off Henry I of England in 1135, he left no son to succeed him. He had made his barons recognise as his heir his daughter Matilda, wife of Geoffrey Plantagenet, Count of Anjou. In the event, however, many lords could...
Historians and the Great Britons: Hugh Brogan Looks at the BBC's Great Debate on the Greatest Britons. (Today's History)
NOW WE KNOW what it is to be marginalised. As the BBC's hugely enjoyable `Great Britons' competition unfolded, the irrelevance of professional historians (school, university, or other) was painfully demonstrated. They could not be totally excluded,...
`King of Scotland': Lauderdale and the Restoration North of the Border: Raymond Campbell Paterson Re-Examines the Fortunes and Friendships of a Key Figure of Charles II's Administration
IN EARLY APRIL 1657 John Maitland, then Earl of Lauderdale (1616-82), wrote from his prison in Windsor Castle, one of the several places he had been confined in ever since his capture by Cromwell's troops after the Battle of Worcester in 1651, that...
Maudslay: The Maya Man: Ian Graham Celebrates the Efforts of the Archaeologist and Photographer in Opening Up for Study the Mayan Civilisation of Central America
Not often is the work of a nineteenth-century field archaeologist valued as highly by modern scholars as it was by their predecessors a century ago. Yet this is true of the documentation of Maya sculpture and inscriptions that a British archaeologist...
Navigational Aids for the History of Science, Technology and the Environment
www.nahste.ac.uk This site is designed to open up a variety of outstanding collections of archives and manuscripts held by the universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow and Heriot-Watt. Funded by the Research Support Libraries Programme, it provides carefully-indexed...
One Hundred and Fifty Years of the Field Magazine. (Frontline)
THIS MONTH THE FIELD celebrates its 150th birthday. A monthly that started out in 1853 as a weekly, it is not quite as venerable as The Observer (founded 1791) or The Economist (founded 1843) but it is older than any other currently monthly publication,...
Round and About: January 2003. (Frontline)
London Julia Margaret Cameron: The First Great Woman Photographer February 6th to May 26th National Portrait Gallery Wolfson Gallery St Martin's Place, London WC2H 0HE Tel: 020 7306 0055 Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Charles Darwin, Thomas Carlyle...
Spreading the Gospel in the Middle Ages: Bernard Hamilton Unravels the Complex Tale of the Spread of the Christian Faith and Its Competing Hierarchies
ALTHOUGH WESTERNERS did not set out to explore the world until the fifteenth century, their beliefs had long since penetrated far and wide. When Constantine the Great and his colleague Licinius had declared Christianity a lawful religion in the Roman...
The Casa De Contratacion Established in Seville: January 20th, 1503. (Months Past)
THE DISCOVERY of America should have given the Spanish economy a giant boost, but in 1503, three years before the death of Christopher Columbus, the city of Seville in Castile was awarded the exclusive right to trade with the New World. The House of...
The Catalpa Rescue Mission. (Frontline)
AS THE THREE-MASTED BARK CATALPA sailed out of New Bedford, Massachusetts, on the morning of April 29th, 1875, she seemed like any other whaler on her way to the Atlantic and the Pacific. Nothing could have been further from the truth. George Smith...
Tito Elected President of the Federal Assembly of Yugoslavia: January 13th, 1953. (Months Past)
IN 1950 THE Federal Assembly of Yugoslavia unanimously resolved that the withering away of the state should begin immediately. The Yugoslav dictator, Marshal Tito, may have been amused. He had an engaging sense of humour, loved Laurel and Hardy films...