History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 53, No. 10, October

Albert Schweitzer's Nobel Prize October 30th 1953
THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE for 1953 went to the author of the Marshall Plan, General George C. Marshall of the United States. At the same time, the previous year's prize, which had been held over, was awarded to Albert Schweitzer world-famous for his work...
A Monumental List: Martin Petchey Outlines a Proposed New Scheme by the Government to Protect Our Heritage
THE DEPARTMENT OF CULTURE, MEDIA AND SPORT have launched a consultation paper which proposes a radical shake-up of the way in which England's historic environment is protected. At present, archaeological sites, historic buildings, conservation areas,...
Art and Patronage in Late Medieval England: To Accompany the Major Exhibition Opening at the Victoria & Albert Museum, Janet Backhouse Explores the Varied Roles of Patronage in the Art of the Later Middle Ages
A major exhibition of late medieval art opens at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London this October. Entitled 'Gothic: Art for England 1400-1547', it presents a comprehensive range of treasures, from acknowledged masterpieces of painting, sculpture...
Black People in Tudor England: Marika Sherwood Reveals the State of Our Knowledge-And Ignorance-About a Period of Our Multi-Racial Past
IN 1577 ELIZABETH I issued an order for a 'Garcon coate of white Taffeta, cut and lined with tincel, striped down with gold and silver ... pointed with pynts and ribands', for her 'lytle Blackamore'. But was the Queen alone in having a Black servant,...
End of the Hundred Years War October 19th, 1453
As HISTORIANS DO NOT fail to point out, it was not a single war that lasted for a hundred years, but a sporadic succession of wars on the same theme. Apart from naval engagements and coastal raids, it was fought entirely on French soil and is thought...
Filming the First World War: Jonathan Lewis and Hew Strachan Point out the Daunting Challenges and Exciting Opportunities Involved in Producing a New Major TV Series
THE FIRST WORLD WAR, as a subject for television, has acquired a lot of baggage over the past forty years. Our film researcher, Alison McAllan, was told by some colleagues on starting out that her task would be easy, because there wasn't a lot of footage...
Fortune of War: As the Government Prepares to Bring Casinos to Our High Streets, John Childs Looks at a Gambling Craze of the 1690s
THE BRITISH WILL BET on virtually anything from the size of marrows, through slug racing, to how long it takes to run round the quadrangle of an Oxford College. Between 1569 and 1826 it was also possible for Britain's wealthier inhabitants to purchase...
Lisa Jardine: In the 20th Article in His Quarterly Series about Today's Historians, Daniel Snowman Meets the Renaissance and Shakespeare Scholar, Historian of Science and Biographer of Erasmus, Bacon, Wren and Hooke
'I HAVE NEVER understood the difference between the arts and the sciences, or felt the need to choose between them.' The sentence could have come from Dr Jacob Bronowski, the Polish-born mathematician, scientist, television Brains Truster, presenter...
Monkey Puzzle: Hugh Miles Assesses the Significance of the Piltdown Hoax, Exposed Fifty Years Ago This Autumn
ONCE CITED AS THE 'MISSING LINK' between man and beast and definitive proof of the theory of evolution, the Piltdown Man was exposed as a hoax fifty years ago. Eoanthropus Dawsoni was 'excavated' in 1912 by amateur archaeologist Charles Dawson from...
Our Friends from the East: Russian Revolutionaries and British Radicals, 1852-1917: John Slatter Celebrates the Far-Ranging Contributions of Russian Political Emigres to British Life in the Half-Century before 1917
FROM 1852, WHEN Alexander Gertsen (1812-70) first arrived in Britain, until 1917, there was a constant flow of Russian emigres to these shores, among them tens of thousands of Jewish refugees from persecution or forced conversion. The large numbers...
People of the Book Success in the English Reformation: Kari Konkola and Diarmaid MacCulloch Use the Evidence of Book Publishing to Contribute to the Debate about How Widely the English Reformation Affected Ordinary Men and Women
WAS THE ENGLISH REFORMATION a success? Over the last four decades, discussion of this crucial event in English history has changed drastically. In 1964, A.G. Dickens published his now-classic The English Reformation, describing how sixteenth-century...
Protection from the Tyranny of Treatment: Natasha McEnroe Shows That a New Exhibition Provides Insights into Both Medical and Sexual Practices in the Eighteenth Century
WOULD DR JOHNSON have raised an eyebrow at some of the items currently on display in his Dictionary Garret? This autumn's exhibition at Dr Johnson's House--The Tyranny of Treatment: Samuel Johnson, His Friends and Georgian Medicine--illustrates the...
Robert Emmet Uninscribed: Marianne Elliott Examines the Facts and the Myth of the Unlikely Irish Nationalist Hero Who Vowed His 'Tomb Remain Uninscribed until My Country Takes Her Place among the Nations of the Earth'
The Republic of Ireland is a young nation. It was born amid bloodshed and this is reflected in the events and people it chooses to commemorate. This year it commemorates the bi-centennial of the most iconic of its icons: the United Irishman Robert...
Robert Grosseteste Dies October 9th, 1253
DESCRIBED as 'a medieval Dr Johson in his powers of mind and personality', Robert Grosseteste (Bighead or even Fathead), Bishop Lincoln, was probably in his eighties when he died at his favourite manor house at Buckden in Huntingdonshire. A leading...
Thomas Westrowe (1616-53)
FEW MEN DEMONSTRATE better the emergence of a new breed of parliamentarian in the turbulent decades of the mid-seventieth century than Thomas Westrowe. This month's abridged draft biograpby of an MP from the files of the History of Parliament covers...
Women at War: Penny Ritchie Calder of the Imperial War Museum Introduces a Major New Exhibition for This Autumn
'MY GOOD LADY--GO HOME AND SIT STILL' suggested the man from the War Office when confronted by a feisty Scottish doctor, Elsie Inglis, who wanted to offer her services for the war effort in 1914. Sitting still is not, however, in women's nature. Particularly...