History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 48, No. 7, July

50 Years of the NHS
The fiftieth anniversary of the National Health Service, which falls on duly 5th, 1998, is a particularly suitable moment for reflecting on its record and also for considering some of the sources of disadvantage that have affected the system since...
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Albert Robida's Imperfect Future
A 19th-century French novelist's vision of the future included not just television, air transport and women in the workplace, but also biological warfare and population crises Robert Hendrick examines the predictions of Albert Robida. Who, before...
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Campaign for History
OVER THE NEXT EIGHTEEN months the government will settle the place of history within the National Curriculum for several years. Widespread and legitimate concerns that the curriculum is overloaded, and the demand - taken up by politicians - that more...
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Gaza's Archaeological Struggles
IT IS HOPED THAT THE RECENT discovery of a series of fine mosaics from a Byzantine church and the intact walls of the port city into which the generals of Alexander the Great sailed in the fourth century BC will convince the world that the Gaza Strip...
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Lest We Forget
SOME MIGHT ARGUE THAT THE conspicuous armies of tombstones in the cemeteries that patchwork the Belgian countryside are enough to instill humility, reverence and horror at the waste of lives in those of us for whom the First World War is already `mere...
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Opening of the London Olympics
THE SUN BLAZED DOWN ON Wembley Stadium in London on Thursday, July 29th, 1948, when the fourteenth games of the modern Olympiad were formerly opened by George VI in the presence of a host of dignitaries and a crowd of more than 80,000 people. The...
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Papon in Perspective
* The trial of Maurice Papon for crimes against humanity, which finished on April 1st this year, was messy. In part this springs from the fact that the crimes under examination, i.e. the participation of French civil servants in the deportation of...
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She-Devils, Harlots and Harridans in Northern Renaissance Prints
The social, sexual and demonic power of women was an important theme in the popular print of Germany and the Low Countries in the 16th century, as Julie Nurse shows. They beat men, stole their money, killed them even, and they could fly - a veritable...
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Steaming through Africa
On the hundred years ago a French expedition struggled from the mouth of the Congo to southern Sudan, only to have their plans thwarted by the British. Sarah Searight revisits the Fashoda incident. On the evening of July 10th 1898 a small flotilla...
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The Countess' Pillar, Westmoreland
* There is a small, railed enclosure where the drive from Brougham Castle meets the road from Penrith to Appleby. Inside stand an octagonal pillar and a low table, both made of local stone. The pillar supports a square capital, on three sides of which...
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The Martian Century
* Popular interest in Mars, the `Red Planet' is long-established, but has enjoyed two dramatic flowerings, one in the 1890s and the other a century later. Two developments have quickened current media attention: the revelation by the US National Aeronautics...
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The Pirate, the Ambassador and the Map-Maker
When in 1681 pirate Bartholomew Sharpe captured a Spanish ship and with it a detailed description of the west coast of the Americas, he gave English cartographers a field day and won himself an unexpected acquittal. James Kelly explains. On June...
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Women Pilgrims of the Middle Ages
`There's no discouragement Shall make him once relent His first avowed intent To be a pilgrim.' Women, however, endured vexations of their own as Diana Webb outlines. `Do you not realise you are a woman and cannot go just anywhere?' with these words,...
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