History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 60, No. 3, March

An Ideal Stepmother: Katherine Parr, the Intelligent and Ambitious Last Queen of Henry VIII, Had a Profound Influence on the Development of Edward VI and Elizabeth I. Linda Porter Looks at Her Relationships with the Royal Children and Shows How She Helped Shape the Mind of One of England's Greatest Monarchs
At the end of July 1544 the 10-year-old Lady Elizabeth, younger daughter of Henry VIII, composed a heartfelt letter in faltering Italian. Its English translation began: 'Inimical Fortune, envious of all good, she who revolves things human, has deprived...
Breaking the Sound Barrier: Mark Juddery Looks at the Historical Backdrop to the Much-Loved 1950s Hollywood Musical, Singin' in the Rain in Which Hollywood Tells Its Own Story of the Arrival of Sound to the Big Screen
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Singin' in the Rain frequently appears high on lists of the 'greatest' films ever made, whether voted by movie buffs, critics, or both (it was voted best on-screen musical by a 2006 American Film Institute poll and came eighth...
Could This Be the Ultimate Villa Holiday?
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] AROUND 1540, a young Italian mason named Andrea di Pietro della Gondola designed his first country residence, and in doing so began a career that profoundly altered Western architecture. Palladio, as his patron dubbed him,...
Cuba's African Adventures: In 1959 Fidel Castro Came to Power in Cuba after a Masterly Campaign of Guerrilla Warfare. Drawing on This Success, Castro and His Followers, Including Che Guevara, Sought to Spread Their Revolution, as Clive Foss Explains
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Since his student days Fidel Castro had been an enthusiastic revolutionary, inspired by Cuba's great patriot lose Marti and by Karl Marx. From a remote base in the Sierra Maestra mountains, he defeated the armies of the dictator...
Dr Trelawney's Cabinet of Historical Curiosities: This Month's Subject: Revolvers
Physicist William Ayrton (1847-1908) went to Tokyo in 1873 charged by the Meiji government with turning some of their medieval Samurai warriors into western-style telegraph engineers. Unused to the degree of murder and ritual suicide which his pupils...
From the Editor
Gloom has descended upon university history departments throughout Britain. Cambridge's history faculty has followed that of Oxford in freezing all new appointments, perhaps for years to come. One senior historian has described the position outside...
Jane Whorwood: The King's Smuggler: John Fox Tells the Remarkable Story of a Dynamic Scottish Woman Who Repeatedly Risked Her Life in Order to Assist and Protect Charles I
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] "My travels, accidents, dangers, more become a Romance than a letter', wrote the royalist agent lane Whorwoodin 1648. Whorwood was a tough, genteel maverick. She was described by contemporaries as 'red haired' and as 'a tall,...
Longman-History Today 2009 Book of the Year Award
Since 1984 History Today and Longman--the publishers of the magazine throughout the 1970s and 1980s--have joined forces to award a prize to the history book published the previous year which in the opinion of the judges is best able to make historical...
Longman-History Today Awards 2009
Many of Britain's leading historians gathered for our annual celebration of excellence in history. Diarmaid MacCulloch, the historian and broadcaster whose recent BBC Television series A History of Christianity won widespread critical acclaim, was...
Lutheran Lampoons: Martin Luther Used Pictorial Propaganda to Further the Protestant Cause. Mark Bryant Looks at the Work of Those Artists Who Became His Allies-And Those Who Became His Enemies
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Of the three traditional learned professions--the church, the law and medicine--it is the clergy that has suffered most at the hands of graphic satirists. This was especially so during the Reformation in 16th-century Germany...
Months Past: Portugal Takes a Chunk of India; a Daredevil Wins a Pilot's Licence; and Modern Iran Is Born. Richard Cavendish Looks at March's Anniversaries
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] MARCH 4th, 1510 The Portuguese seize Goa Vasco da Gama returned to Lisbon in 1499 after his voyage round the Cape of Good Hope to the south-western coast of India. He had hoped to find Christians there in the domains...
Remembering Sharpeville: The Killing of 69 Black South Africans on March 21st, 1960 Was a Turning Point: The World Judged Apartheid to Be Morally Bankrupt and the Political Agitation That Ensued Would Eventually Overturn White Supremacy
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Fifty years ago the name Sharpeville reverberated around the world. Newspaper headlines proclaimed that numerous protesters against South Africa's notorious pass laws had been killed and many more wounded. Articles were accompanied...
Sectarian Footballs
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Sectarian footballs Objects loaded with the history of the Troubles are scattered around Belfast, but sensitivity means the debate about how and where to exhibit them rumbles on, says James Morrison. For many people,...
The First Tourist: In the 15th Century, Cyriacus of Ancona Journeyed in Search of the Mediterranean's Classical Past. in So Doing, He Laid the Groundwork for the 18th-Century Grand Tour and Today's Cultural Holidays
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Today we take it for granted that we travel around the world to admire the monuments of the past. We prepare for such trips by reading about what we are going to see, set out on the journey with a good idea of how we will...
When Enemies United: Before the First World War, Irish Unionists and Nationalists Were Poised to Fight Each Other over the Imposition of Home Rule by the British. Then, Remarkably, They Fought and Died Side by Side
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In the summer of 1914 war threatened to engulf Ireland. Sure enough, it came in early August. But it was not the war that anybody had expected. For much of 1912-14 Ireland verged not on a Great War but on civil war. Yet remarkably,...
Where's the Knowledge?
The teaching of history should give students a broad knowledge of their subject rather than focus on the skills needed to analyse narrow periods, says Sean Lang, 'Is there any point to which you wish to draw my attention? 'To the curious incident...
Wren Reconstructed: Leo Hollis Visits the History Today Archive to Find an Appreciation of Christopher Wren Written by a Kindred Spirit at a Time When Both Sides of Wren's Genius-The Scientist and the Artist-Were Rarely Explored
The 250th anniversary of the death of Christopher Wren was the reason that Harold E Hutchison wrote his article in 1973. Hutchison does not seem the ideal candidate--he was the author of biographies of Edward II, Richard II and Henry V and had written...