History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 45, No. 9, September

An African Autumn
* African art and its historical and social context is front-stage in Belgium and Britain in the next few months, as a quartet of initiatives exposes many masterworks to the general public for the first time. Leading the way is Belgium, like Britain...
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Australia's Not-So-Dry Bones
* Recent research by one of Australia's leading archaeologists has opened to question two major historical `facts' relating to the original inhabitants of the continent: their population at the time of British invasion and the current explanation for...
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Canada's Phoenix Basilica
* A campaign has been extended across Canada this year to raise $2.6 million towards the cost of rebuilding St George's Church in Halifax, Nova Scotia, a Canadian historic treasure destroyed by fire in June 1994. It is hoped that the rebuilding of the...
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Lepanto and the Arts of Creation
Iain Fenlon explores how Catholic Europe's great 16th-century sea victory over the Turk was celebrated and propagandised. Question. What do the following have in common: a make of Spanish brandy, a station on the Rome underground and a stamp issued...
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Performance Art? Puritans in the Pulpit
It has become commonplace for critics to associate modern evangelical preaching with theatricality and artificiality, as in the literary depiction of Elmer Gantry by Sinclair Lewis and the recent pop hit `Jesus He Knows Me' by the English rock group,...
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Reagan's Rise
The 1966 California gubernatorial race was supposed to be about big government, welfare and high taxation. But, after a few weeks of campaigning, the Republican candidate Ronald Reagan told his handlers: Look, I don't care if I'm in the mountains, the...
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The 1848 Unification of Switzerland
The unification of Switzerland, or Helvetia, in the nineteenth century, like the unification of western Europe in the twentieth century, was a long and complex process. The contentious issues at stake were sovereignty, religious toleration, a single...
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The Idea of Neighbourhood, 1900-50
* Right across the political spectrum politicians and other informed commentators speak, with some urgency, of the deteriorating sense of community in modern Britain. The loss of community spirit, it is argued, is manifested in fragmented neighbourhoods...
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The Leopard
What to do art critics do? Usually, they produce knowledge. By exploring the social and political, aesthetic and technical issues of concern to artists and by knitting these matters into critical readings, they provide their readers with new interpretations....
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The Mausoleum of Halicarnassus
* Ancient Greek art has always been greatly admired both at home and abroad. This can be seen by the fact that all over Europe and Asia, indeed far beyond the Mediterranean shores, people have owned Greek works of art. Painted Athenian wine cups have...
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The Orange Order, 1795-1995
Andrew Boyd offers a bicentennial analysis of the outlook and influence, past and present, of a key element in the culture of Protestant Ulster. Strangers coming to Northern Ireland during the summer must often be puzzled by what seems to be an incessant...
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Writing History for - and of - the Millenium
* History Today: but what about history tomorrow - or in one thousand or ten thousand years' time? In the film Big, Tom Hanks played a little boy who, trapped inside a grown man's body, had a brilliant career as a toy designer. One of his inventions...
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