History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 48, No. 1, January

Archaeology at the Crossroads
Archaeology has changed, is changing, but needs to change even more. This was the consensus among speakers at a conference held in November at Lincoln's history-layered castle and cathedral hilltop. The conference, promoted by the English Historic...
Charlemagne's Church at Aachen
Aachen today is a delightful small town in the North-Rhine-Westfalia region of western Germany. It was, and still is, much visited because of its associations with Charles the Great (Charlemagne) and the Holy Roman Empire. At Aachen, Charles' favourite...
Death of Lewis Carroll
When Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (above) climbed into the small boat moored on the river at Oxford in July, 1862, joining the Liddell children, Alice, Lorina and Edith, and his colleague Robinson Duckworth, he could little have known that the outcome...
EMU: First Time Around
* At the European Council meeting at Luxembourg in April 1980, the EEC heads of government abadoned the objective of completing the final stages of a European Monetary System, which would have included setting up a European Monetary Fund with central...
Mahatma Gandhi Assassinated
On this day, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was heading to an afternoon prayer meeting in New Delhi when out of the crowd gathering around him, rushed a man brandishing a Beretta revolver. The man -- a Hindu militant called Nathuran Godse -- went straight...
Napoleon & Europe
Napoleon Bonaparte was the greatest general of his day, but he was more than a great warrior. He was also a statesman concerned to make France a great and modern state, a dynast ambitious to make the Bonapartes the leading family in Europe, and a...
Napoleon's Rise to Power
On October 9th, 1799, at Frejus in south-eastern France, General Napoleon Bonaparte disembarked from the frigate which had carried him from Egypt, evaded British cruisers and brought him safely back to the French Republic. Bonaparte had been plucked...
Napoleon - the Myth
Napoleon dominated the imagination of the nineteenth century to an even greater extent than Hitler has dominated that of the twentieth. `Is he not unparalleled in the history of the world both as a military man, and a general statesman?' asked George...
One (Saxon) Man and His Horse
Within days of a major archaeological find of a horse and man burial thought to be on a par with the Sutton Hoo discoveries, researchers world-wide were being kept up-to-date on the latest information via a special Internet site. Over 600 callers...
Sakhalin: The Japanese under Soviet Rule
The island of Sakhalin in the Sea of Okhotsk is a microcosm of Russo-Japanese relations. `Discovered' almost simultaneously by the Russians and the Japanese in the mid-seventeenth century, it witnessed several shifts of rule between 1855 and 1945....
Sicilian Uprising Starts a Year of European Revolutions
No state in Europe is in a worse condition than ours, not excepting even the Turks,' wrote the revolutionary, Luigi Settembrini in 1847. `. . . In the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, in the country which is said to be the garden of Europe, the people...
The Empire Behind the Lines
Napoleon is best remembered as a great military commander, and it is usually the story of how he built -- and then lost -- his great empire that first evokes an interest in his life and times. Napoleon's other distinguishing feature in the eyes of...
The Lost Palace of Whitehall
Three hundred years ago this month news from London reached Versailles that the royal palace of Whitehall had burnt down. Soon after, the Duc de Saint-Simon noted in his memoirs `a fire destroyed Whitehall, the largest and ugliest palace in Europe'....
The Return to Confucius?
My house on the outskirts of Canton was called Chi Yuan, the Garden of Wisdom. It was in Mei Hua Tsuen, Plum Blossom Village, in the shadow of White Cloud Mountain, next door to the vast embattled mansion of Chen Chi-tang, brother of Chiang Kai-shek's...
Times and Tides
* Four centuries of the wheelchair -- and that is all. The best corrective for those of us who might be tempted to flee to the past is the medical record. There is in the Louvre a panel painting by Peter Breugel the Elder signed and dated 1568, `the...
Van Eyck's United
Small is beautiful, as advertising slogans so tiresomely tell us, but d is unlikely that a show as small as the Jan van Eyck exhibition which opens at the National Gallery in London on the 15th, will be viewed as anything but big. This is an important...