History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 45, No. 10, October

Anglo-Saxon Double Monasteries
The double monasteries of Anglo-Saxon England have attracted the attention of historians recently, particularly those with an interest in womens' studies, because of the importance of their abbesses, who ruled over communities consisting of monks as...
Beirut's Past Comes to Life
After twenty years closed to the world, the National Museum of Beirut is dusting off its treasures and emerging from the rubble and scars of the recent civil war to re-open its doors to the public. And in the city centre itself, archaeologists are racing...
Blasphemy in Victorian Britain? Foote and the Freethinker
In the aftermath of one of the most famous brushes with the religious laws of England, George William Foote concluded by way of a pyrrhic victory that `Blasphemy is entirely a matter of opinion. What is blasphemy in one country is piety in another. Progress...
Gainsborough's House
* Among the cluttered stalls and bellowed bargains of Sudbury's cheerful market place the figure of Thomas Gainsborough stands high on its plinth, holding palette and brushes as if to record the scene. Gainsborough is far and away the most famous of...
Ghana's Crumbling Heritage
The beaches of Ghana are among the most attractive in West Africa. Frowning down on thirty-one of them are the forts and castles which, for the most part, owe their existence to the slave trade. These beaches and castles - two splendid assets for tourism...
Madrid: City of the Enlightenment
In 1785 Tomas Lopez, Royal Geographer to King Charles Ill and Spain's foremost cartographer, published his Plano Geomtrico de Madrid. It was a particularly fine map of the Spanish capital and a typical product of later eighteenth-century enlightened...
Melfort: A Jacobite Connoisseur
John Drummond, Duke of Melfort, has traditionally been regarded by Whig historians as the epitome of the evil Jacobite. Even the so-called revisionist Jacobite historians have found few words of praise to give him. For them he was the councillor who...
Pan-Africanism: 50 Years On
As it took place only months after the end of the War, it is not completely surprising that very little press attention was devoted to a meeting in Manchester of Africans, black Americans and West Indians. Most historians now regard the sixth Pan-African...
The Ghost of Sir Richard Scott's Inquiry
A British company sells arms to renegade third-world countries; the Conservative-led Government tries to deflect public criticism by forming an inquiry led by a Lord Justice; civil servants and a former prime minister appear before the inquiry; the government...
Uganda Looks to Its History
`Uganda needs its history to progress', says Paul Wamala, director of the National Museum in Kampala. This autumn he is mounting an exhibition which fully examines the country's often very violent past - `Uganda Yesterday and Today'. It tells the story...
Venetia Digby on Her Deathbed
In the wake of a new exhibition at London's Dulwich Picture Gallery which traces the links between the portrayals of passion and death in Stuart England, Ann Sumner considers the life, times and 'good end' of VanDyck's celebrated example from the genre....