History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 54, No. 9, September

Birch of Umberto II of Italy: September 15th, 1904
THE HOUSE OF Savoy was Europe's longest-lasting ruling dynast. Dukes of Savoy, Princes of Piedmont, Kings of Sardinia and finally of united Italy, they held sway from the eleventh century, for a longer span than the pharaohs of the Old Kingdom of Egypt...
British Intelligence and the Nazi Recruit: Stephen Tyas Uncovers a Skeleton in the Closeted World of Espionage
IN THE UNITED STATES IN 1998, President Bill Clinton signed the Nazi War Crimes Disclosure Act, and as a result several million pages of Second World War intelligence material began to be declassified. A team of US historians and intelligence officials...
Coming to Terms with the Past: Cambodia: Ben Kiernan Points out the Progress, and Difficulties, in Recovering History and Justice after Genocide
HALF A MILLENNIUM OF CIVIL CONFLICT, foreign invasions, and even genocide not only devastated Cambodia, but "also prevented the Khmer people from weighing their experiences in historical perspective. Hindu, Buddhist, royalist, republican, colonial...
Crimea in the Round: John Hannavy Looks at Panoramas of the Siege of Sevastopol in the Crimean War
THE CRIMEAN WAR (1853-56) has often been described as the last medieval war and the first modern one. It has also been described as the first war of the photographic age, and Roger Fenton (1819-69) as the first war photographer. War photography in...
Death of Louis IV of the West Franks: September 10th, 954
THE LIFE AND REIGN of Louis d'Outremer were part of the slow dying of the Carolingian monarchy in what is now France. After the Emperor Charlemagne died in 814 his empire broke up and three kingdoms emerged, a western Francia, an eastern one and a...
Fat Is a Historian's Issue: With Millennium Reshowing on UKTV History, Felipe Fernandez-Armesto Offers an Ecological Look at the World in the 19th Century
OBESITY IS OUR OBSESSION. Most societies, for most of history, esteemed fat bodies and fat diets. The fat were rich, the thin, poor. Now--for the first time ever--it is the other way round: you can never, said the Duchess of Windsor, 'be too rich or...
Flying in the Face of Adversity: Emily Mayhew Tells the Story of the Heroic RAF Pilots Who Overcame Horrific Burns and Formed 'The Most Exclusive Club in the World', and of Archibald McIndoe, the Plastic Surgeon Who Helped Them
BRITAIN'S HOME FRONT in the Second World War was unique. Never before had so many ordinary citizens had such direct and prolonged contact with one of the theatres of war. To see and hear the numerous aircraft buzzing overhead was for millions of Britons...
Goodbye to the Vikings? Richard Hodges Shows How New Evidence Is Leading to a Fresh Understanding of the Role of the Vikings in European History
MEDIEVAL HISTORY HAS TURNED A CORNER with the new millennium. Almost unnoticed, a new paradigm is being shaped. Ninth-century Europe is being re-calibrated by decades thanks not only to many new excavations but also to the wealth of numismatic evidence...
Heritage Is Good for You
THE CONCEPT OF HERITAGE has always been a bit elusive. Once it seemed to carry resonances of genteel country dancing; then it became laden with the paraphernalia of aristocratic splendour and military glory. But in the last ten years or so, new layers...
John Hampden (1595-1643)
John Hampden emerged as one of the most visible of Charles I' s opponents when he was the defendant in the celebrated test case over the legality of Ship Money, and then took a leading role in the Commons in the Short Parliament of 1640. This month'...
No More Bonfires? Chris A. Williams Aspires to a Brighter Future for UK Police History
ON JUNE 18TH, AT THE OPEN UNIVERSITY in Milton Keynes, police officers, historians, museum curators, archivists and others got together to talk about the 'heritage and history of the UK criminal justice system'. The most pressing item on the agenda...
On the Heritage Trail: Daniel Snowman Has Been Tracking Down What Britain's 'Historic Heritage' Means to Some of Those in Charge of It
IT IS FIVE O'CLOCK IN the morning. A relentless sun peers up over the horizon as an army of sturdy English soldiery, lies abed under canvas awaiting the day's campaigning. You could be forgiven for thinking this the dawn of Agincourt. Indeed, you would...
Reining Cavaliers: Lucy Worsley Discusses the Importance of the Art and Discipline of Horsemanship to the Men Who Became Known as the Cavaliers
EVERYBODY HAS A MENTAL picture of the Cavaliers, the gorgeously-dressed supporters of Charles I. We see them through the eyes of Sir Anthony Van Dyck, as his portraits of the aristocrats of the Stuart court suggest a coherent group linked by their...
Round and About: September 2004
London Renaissance Imprisonment 1450-1700 September 3rd--4th HM Tower of London, London EC3N 4AB email: Imprisonment Conference@hotmail .com Organised by Jerome de Groot and Historic Royal Palaces, and sponsored by the Society for Renaissance...
Stalin's Topsy-Turvy Work Week: Clive Foss Investigates How Stalin Changed the Calendar to Keep the Soviet People Continually at Work
'THERE ARE NO FORTRESSES THAT BOLSHEVIKS CANNOT STORM'. With these words, Stalin expressed the dynamic self-confidence of the Soviet Union's Five Year Plan: weak and backward Russia was to turn overnight into a powerful modern industrial country. Between...
St Cuthbert Reburied in Durham Cathedral: September 4th, 1104
CUTHBERT WAS THE most revered and formidable saint of the North. Such was the force of his personality that people who were deathly ill, when told that he was coming, recovered before he had even arrived. Prior of Lindisfarne from the year 664, he...
The Boy Stood on the Learning Deck: Christopher Lee Describes the Voyage of Discovery That Led to Him Becoming a Historian
IT BEGAN WITH A teacher called Mr Edgington. Quite properly in my day we never knew Iris first name. He taught us in a lovely Georgian hall house, with an avenue of Cedars along the drive and a view of the school farmyard and the amble of Jack-a-bow...
The True Caliph of the Arabian Nights: Hugh Kennedy Examines the Life of One of the Most Powerful Men in the World in the Eighth Century
NOT MANY OF THE GREAT figures of early Islamic history are widely known in the Western world today. The achievements of caliphs such as the Umayyad Abd al-Malik (r.685-705) or the second Abbasid caliph Mansur (r.754-75) in consolidating their respective...
Which Is Which? Consumerist or Anti-Capitalist Magazine? Matthew Hilton Examines the Past Progress and Future Dilemmas of the Consumers' Association
How MANY DUSTY COPIES OF Which? magazine must there be lying in the attics of British houses? The comparative testing magazine has been a guide and a source of information for millions of families building homes ever since it was first published in...