History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 45, No. 11, November

Adolf Maps It Out
The conservation movement in Britain has found a powerful new benefactor - Adolf Hitler. A new book has shown how the Luftwaffe's reconnaissance photographs of southern England during the Second World War are helping conservationists, town planners,...
All Quiet on the Western Front
Modris Eksteins on how the Hollywood treatment of Erich von Remarque's book describing the Great War `from the other side' impacted on a Europe traumatised by slaughter and fearful of its future repetition. `I hate it', Sydney Carroll told his Sunday...
An American Coup D'etat?
Some Americans regard their country as superior to other nations because they do not change governments by coup etat - and never have. Perhaps because of a long tradition of power changing hands by election, Americans regard their nation as immune to...
A Soldier's Tale from Khrushchev's USSR
Born in the Ukraine in 1921, Grigori Chukhrai has a prominent place in Soviet cultural history by virtue of his position in the new wave of more open film-making that emerged after Stalin's death. Chukhrai (left) first came to prominence in 1956 with...
Bridging BR's Heritage Gap
Lambley Railway Viaduct, which spans the South Tyne river in a scenic valley a few miles south of Hadrian's Wall, is being restored and handed over to the North Pennines Heritage Trust following a vociferous campaign, backed by Tynedale Council, to save...
Crete's Roman Past
Roman Crete is almost `modern' compared to the timescales studied by archaeologists steeped in the island's 4,000 year old Minoan prehistory. Yet current work is rekindling interest in the long era which began in the second century BC when Rome tried...
Futurism and Fascism
It is particularly appropriate to re-examine the relationship between the rise of Fascism and the literary and artistic movement called Futurism, because in the last decade Futurism has once again been in the news. In 1986 the Italian car manufacturing...
Queen Mary's Institute, Pune
Painted on a red-and-blue sign in the compound of the former army camp outside Bombay, dotted with stone buildings that served as barracks during the Great War, is a verse translated from the Sanskrit, a message of hope to wounded war veterans. `Although...
Republican Ruminations from Down Under
Since 1992 there has been major public disquiet about the position and role of the monarchy. In Britain controversy about the expense of the royal house, the marital status of the Queen's children, and the fitness of the Prince of Wales to assume the...
The Battle for Art in the 1930s
London's Hayward Gallery is currently hosting a major Council of Europe exhibition looking at the role of the arts in the Europe of the Great Dictators. David Elliott, director of the Museum of Modern Art in Oxford, and one of the exhibition's organisers,...
The X Factor in X-Rays
Thousands of scientists, doctors, radiographers and nurses from around the world and with an interest in radiology met in June this year at the Rontgen's Centenary Congress in Birmingham to celebrate Professor Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen's discovery of the...