History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 47, No. 5, May

Aden's Pipe Dream
After decades of neglect, the unique series of water tanks of Aden, in Yemen, which were hollowed out of the volcanic rock at least 2,000 years ago are to be restored and brought back into use. It is not known who built the Tawila tanks, as they...
Anglo-Saxon Attitudes
The much travelled bones of the great St Augustine will hopefully not be turning in their present grave in response to a series of commemorations and special occasions taking place throughout the year to mark the 1400th anniversary of his arrival...
Cola Di Rienzi Proclaims Himself 'Tribune' of Rome
The coup d'etat staged in the ancient Capitol of Rome on Whit Sunday 1347, which made a thirty-something orator of plebian stock effective ruler of the Imperial city, ranks as one of the most intriguing and quixotic episodes in the history of medieval...
Cornish Rebellions, 1497-1648
500 years after their uprising against Henry VII, Mark Stoyle discuss why the Cornish were different -- and often rebellious -- in Tudor and Stuart England. May 1997 sees the 500th anniversary of the Cornish rising of 1497, a rebellion which not...
Daniel O'Connell, Irish Nationalists, Dies in Genoa
The death at the age of seventy-one of the veteran politician, Daniel O'Connell, while on his way to Rome on pilgrimage, deprived mid-Victorian Britain of one of its most intriguing and maverick figures. For the best part of two decades, O'Connell...
Faith in the Nation? the Church of England in the 20th Century
Lively laity, turbulent priests--Andrew Chandler on how the Anglican establishment has adapted to change in society and the body politic since 1900. On the night of May 10th, 1941, the German air force mounted a powerful assault on the heart of London....
How the West Saw Medieval Islam
Since the Christians are not at peace with the Saracens, O Lord', wrote the Mallorcan Ramon Lull, in his Book of Contemplation on God in the early 1270s: ... they dare not hold discussions upon the faith with them when they are among them....
'Naming and Shaming' in Late-Victorian and Edwardian Britain
* Wandsworth Borough in south London is no place for the owners of pets who foul the footpath. In November 1996 the Tory council introduced a policy of `naming and shaming' any of its tenants found guilty of anti-social behaviour. The first batch of...
Send Them to the Tower
Over a hundred 17 and 18 year-old students from round Britain gathered recently at the appropriately historic location of the Tower of London for the first conference in a new joint venture between History Today, its sixth-form periodical History...
Shakespeare and the Nazis
Why did Goering and Goebbels fall out over a performance of Richard III? Gerwin Strobl on this and other intriguing reasons why the Bard mattered to the Third Reich. On April 23rd, 1940, St George's Day, as Hitler's armies were preparing for their...
Soldiers of the Second Crusade Leave from Devon
The departure of over ten thousand crusaders from the port of Dartmouth in May 1147 in a fleet of over 150 ships marked a second-stage initiative to continue the momentum and success of the First Crusade, which against the odds (see History Today's...
The Crusades of St Louis
Around three o'clock on August 25th, 1270, at a fort constructed on the site of ancient Carthage, died Louis IX, the saintly king of France and crusader par excellence. He had been ill for many days, the latest victim of the dysentery or typhus that...
Times & Tides
* If you fancy an escape not merely from place but from the present time, you could try visiting Pollock's Toy Museum in London at 1 Scala Street, immediately behind Goodge Street underground station. There presides Mr Barry Clarke, handing out leaflets...
William III's Privy Garden
Some places seem, quite wrongly of course, to have seen more `history' than others. Because Westminster Hall or the White Cliffs of Dover have events of significance they have a strong sense of history. My main office happens to be in just such a...