History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 56, No. 5, May

Can TV Make History? Peter Furtado Introduces the Remarkable Work of Norma Percy
WE ARE USED TO TELEVISION DOCUMENTARIES about history--they are ubiquitous but largely they reproduce the history that has already appeared in print; and we are aware that a few documentaries (Jamie Oliver's school dinners series being a ease in point)...
Civilians in Warfare 1500-1789: Civilians Have Always Suffered in Warfare, and Early Modern Europe Was No Exception. but They Contributed to War as Well, through Their Taxes, Their Victuals and Their Bodies. Jeremy Black Explores the Relationship between Civilian and Military
THE CRIPPLED, GUN-TOTING protagonist, dependent on begging, in Harlequin Returning from the Wars (c.1742), a painting by the mid-eighteenth century Florentine artist Giovanni Ferretti, was as realistic an image of war as the triumphal celebrations,...
Davitt-Land Warrior: Kevin Haddick Flynn Looks Back at the Life and Times of Radical Michael Davitt as Ireland Remembers the Centenary of His Death on May 31st
AS DAWN WAS BREAKING on April 3rd, 1878, a crusty, seventy-two-year-old Irish landlord, William Sidney Clements, 3rd Earl of Leitrim, was travelling on his horse and sidecar along a deserted roadway near his estate in County Donegal when he was ambushed...
Going to the Dogs: Mike Huggins Revisits the Early Years of British Greyhound Racing, the Smart Modern Sports Craze of Interwar Britain
GREYHOUND RACING was the third largest commercial leisure activity in late 1930s Britain, after the cinema and soccer. Cinema's weekly attendances averaged over 18 million. But in 1936 the tracks regulated by the National Greyhound Racing Club (NGRC)...
Hold the Front Page: Mark Bryant Describes How the Daily Mail Nearly Became the First National Daily in Britain to Feature Large Political Cartoons on Its Front Page, Fifteen Years before Dyson's Huge Drawings Appeared in the Daily Herald
IT IS QUITE UNUSUAL NOWADAYS for a full-scale political cartoon to appear on the front page of a national daily newspaper in Britain. Since the Second World War there have often been topical single-column or 'pocket' cartoons on the front page by the...
May's Anniversaries: John Brown's Body ... Columbus's Last Great Journey ... and the First Demonstration of the Most Powerful Weapon in History. Richard Cavendish Recalls This Month's Anniversaries
The Pottawatomie Creek Massacre May 24th, 1856 THE ANTI-SLAVERY FANATIC whose body lies a-mouldering in the grave while his soul goes marching on was driven by religious fervour as much as anything recognizable as human sympathy. John Brown was...
Montenegro Chooses: On May 21st, Montenegrins Are Being Asked, in a Long-Delayed Referendum, If They Want to End Their Union with Serbia. James Evans Explains the Background to Their Momentous Decision
IF, AS SEEMS LIKELY, the people of Montenegro say yes to secession from Serbia and the restoration of their independence after nearly ninety years, their decision will bring to an end a long period of speculation and political manoeuvring, not only...
Pictures on the Page: Sheila Corr, History Today Picture Editor, Explains How Pictures, Properly Archived and Used, Can Add to Our Knowledge of the Past
'FASCINATING PICTURES--WHERE DO THEY COME FROM?' 'Why can't I find pictures like that on Google?' and 'Why are they not mentioned in the text?' are a few of the comments readers made in our recent readership survey. The last question is the easiest...
Portsmouth: Graham Gendall Norton Introduces a City That Has Faced Invasions and Foreign Adventures since Roman Times
TWO THOUSAND YEARS RISE AND FALL with the tide as it swirls through the narrow channel at Portsmouth Point and into the harbour. The city is sited at, and named after, the mouth of a port, Portchester, around four miles further north. The great harbour...
Romancing the Stone: Discovered during the French Occupation but Seized by the Victorious British after Six Months of Desert Battle, the Rosetta Stone Symbolized the Struggle for Cultural Supremacy between Two Great Rivals, Both on a Quest for Knowledge and Archaeological Riches. Jonathan Downs Tells How Exactly the Rosetta Stone Found Its Way to Britain
IN FEBRUARY 1802, the captured French frigate HMS L'Egyptienne sailed into Portsmouth harbour. On board was Colonel Tomkyns Hilgrove Turner (1766-1843) and in his charge, so he claimed, a relic that had set the academic world ablaze: the Rosetta Stone--the...
Round and About: May 2006
Museum and Galleries Month April 29th-June 4th Various UK locations Tel: 020 7233 9796 www.mgm.org.uk www.24hourmuseum.org.uk May sees the collaboration of UK museums, art galleries and heritage attractions in a month-long programme of activities....
The Foundation of Belgium: Philip Mansel Recalls the Creation of the Kingdom of Belgium in 1831, in a Successful Act of Co-Operation between London, Paris and Brussels
BELGIUM IS OFTEN DISMISSED as an artificial country, with no clear identity. In fact since the golden age of the Dukes of Burgundy in the fifteenth century, Flanders and Brabant, Brussels, Bruges and Antwerp have been among of Europe's cultural and...
The General Strike: On the 80th Anniversary of the General Strike, Martin Pugh Revisits One of the Most Bitter Disputes in History and Assesses Its Impact on Industrial Relations and the Wider Political Landscape of the Twentieth Century
EIGHTY YEARS AGO this month Britain experienced a unique event in her history. From May 4th to 12th, 1926, the General Strike largely paralysed her economy and threatened to bring down her elected government. Called to defend the miners from drastic...
The Voice for History: The Historical Association Is Celebrating Its Hundredth Birthday. Keith Robbins Appraises Its Past and Present Role in Acting as the Voice for 'History'
I AM NOT VERY KEEN on the proposed Historical Association,' wrote the medieval historian Reginald Lane Poole to A.F. Pollard, the recently appointed professor of constitutional history at University College, London, in April 1906. Pollard was an enthusiast...
Top Dog: Pedigree Marketing and Its Value: Margaret Walsh Tracks Down an Attempt to Link the Appeal of the Greyhound with the Brand Values of a Famous American Company
IN THE LATE 1950S AND 1960s the Greyhound Corporation, the largest provider of long-distance bus travel in North America, publicized its services by using a pedigree dog, believing that a campaign emphasizing breeding and class would identify bus travel...
Voices for History
ONE OF THE PURPOSES of a magazine like H/story Today is to contribute a regular public voice for our subject in the public arena. Not that British historians have a lot of trouble getting heard individually, of course, but the subject is one of such...