History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 55, No. 10, October

Black Victorians: Patrick Vernon, a Key Figure in the Greatest Black Britons Campaign, Discusses Depictions of Blacks in Victorian Art and Popular Culture, and Introduces a New Exhibition on the Subject, Opening in Manchester
HISTORY HAS A HABIT of repeating itself and reinventing cultural and historical experiences. The history of African people and the diaspora living in Europe, North America, the Caribbean and South America is no exception. The new exhibition 'Black...
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Childhood in the Roman Empire: Ray Laurence Considers How Children Were Seen in Ancient Rome and Looks at Some of the Harsher Aspects of Childhood-Sickness, Violence and Endless Work
TODAY, IN THE WEST AT LEAST, we find it hard to accept the unexplained death of a child. The terminology associated with these deaths, such as Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), points to our inability to comprehend the randomness and sheer bad luck...
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Death of the Emperor Akbar
TEN DAYS AFTER his sixty-third birthday, the greatest of the Great Moguls (or Mughals) died of dysentery in his capital of Agra. A ruler since his teens, Jalal-ud-Din Muhammad Akbar had brought two-thirds of the Indian subcontinent into an empire which...
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Dover Soul: Two Books Opened Classical Linguist and Historian Peter Jones's Eyes to the Nature of the Historian's Role
GREEK AND ROMAN language and literature kept me enthralled at school, and the thrill did not wear off when I scraped in Cambridge to read Classics. History came into it but I did not see myself as a 'historian'. Three subsequent turning-points persuaded...
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George IV: A Sketch: Kenneth Baker Looks at the Foibles and Achievements of One of Britain's Most Controversial Monarchs through the Eyes of His Caricaturists
ON THE SUNNY JUNE DAY in 1830 when George IV (who had been king since 1820) died, Ton] Moore, the poet, wrote: Never saw London so excited or lively ... crowds everywhere, particularly in St James's Street ... the whole thing reminded...
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Latimer and Ridley Burned at the Stake: October 16th, 1555
ACROSS IN' THE ROAD in Oxford's Broad St marks the site of the execution. Workmen had discovered part of a stake and some bits of charred bone there, in what had once been part of the town ditch. Whether, as the flames were kindled, Latimer really...
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Lawrence in Arabia: Diplomat and Traveller Hugh Leach Draws on His Experience of Working with Arab Tribes to Examine T.E. Lawrence's Strategy in the Arab Revolt, in Anticipation of a New Exhibition at the IWM
T.E. LAWRENCE'S TACTICS in helping organize the Arab revolt have been the subject of serious military studies. Basil Liddell Hart, in T.E. Lawrence in Arabia and After (1934), claimed they were superior to those of Saxe, Von Clausewitz (Lawrence's...
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New Model Britain
ARGUABLY, THE MOST IMPORTANT EVENT in British history is the trial and execution of Charles I (with the royalist recoil a decade later). After the King had seen fit to take up arms against his people in a hugely destructive war, his defeat, public...
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Pootering About: Peter Morton Reminds Us That, a Century before Adrian Mole, There Was Charles Pooter
IN Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction, the latest of her hilarious fictive diaries, Sue Townsend sends her hero to a ceremony. Too late he discovers that the front of his trousers is stained with dried evaporated milk. He spends the occasion...
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Round and About: October 2005
London Lawrence of Arabia: The Life, the Legend October 14th to April 17th Imperial War Museum, Lambeth Road, London SE1 6HZ Tel: 020 7416 5320 www.iwm.org.uk In the year which sees the seventieth anniversary of the death of T.E....
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The Conquest of Algiers: Nigel Falls Describes How France Became Caught Up in an Unexpectedly Complicated Imperial Adventure in 1830
IN JULY 1830 A FRENCH expeditionary force conquered the city of Algiers and by 1847, almost all of the territory of what is now Algeria north of the Sahara had been subdued. The conquest brought to an end nearly 400 years of Ottoman rule and inaugurated...
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The Fauves at the Salon d'Automne: Oct 15th, 1905
WRITING OF A sculpture in Renaissance style menacingly hemmed in by paintings by Matisse and others in Room VII at the Salon d'Automne in Paris in 1905, the critic Louis Vauxcelles, who would later coin the term Cubism, called it un Donatello parmi...
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The Morrill Majority: In the Twenty-Eighth and Final Essay in This Series, Daniel Snowman Meets John Morrill, Historian of the Civil War, Oliver Cromwell and the Recurrent Political Instability of the 'Atlantic Archipelago'
THE PROFESSOR OF BRITISH AND IRISH HISTORY at the University of Cambridge turned up sporting a splendid 'Guinness'-emblazoned tie. It was a hot, sticky summer's evening and John Morrill had spent much of the day working on the Ford Lectures he is to...
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The Search for Dido: Sarah Minney, a Genealogist-Researcher, Solves the Mystery of the Later Life of a Famous Black Beauty of the Late 18th Century
DIDO ELIZABETH BELLE (or Dido Elizabeth Belle Lindsay, as she is sometimes known) was the illegitimate daughter of an aristocratic English naval captain, later admiral, Sir John Lindsay (1737-88). He was a man with a somewhat checkered career in the...
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What the Regicides Did for Us: Far from Being the Bogeymen of History, Geoffrey Robertson QC Says That the English Regicides Were Men of Principle Who Established Our Modern Freedoms
THE PROCEEDING AGAINST CHARLES I in 1649 secured the constitutional gains of the Civil War--the supremacy of Parliament, the independence of judges, individual freedom guaranteed by Magna Carta and the common law. But they brought little fame to those...
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Why Did Charles I Fight at Naseby? Richard Cust Reassesses the Thinking Behind the Biggest Military Blunder of the English Civil War, Charles I's Decision to Fight the New Model Army at Naseby in June 1645
WHY DID CHARLES I decide to fight the New Model Army at the Battle of Naseby on June 14th, 1645? It was arguably the single biggest military blunder of the English Civil War. His army of between 9,000 and 10,000 men was heavily outnumbered by Fairfax's...
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Winston Churchill the H-Bomb & Nuclear Disarmament: Geoffrey Best Considers Winston Churchill's Growing Alarm about the Possibility of Nuclear War, and His Efforts to Ensure That Its Horrors Never Happened
WINSTON CHURCHILL must be the only recipient of a Nobel Prize who was less than wholly thrilled by it. He was awarded the Prize for Literature in the autumn of 1953. Honours and awards had recently showered upon him but this one was special: '12,000...
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