History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 56, No. 6, June

Berlin: Neil Taylor Suggests That the Starting Point from Which to Explore the Full and Varied History of Berlin Is the Apparently Empty Space at Its Centre
CAPITAL CITIES WILL OFTEN ARGUE about the location of their centre; is it a cathedral, a parliament building, or a royal palace? It is unlikely to be a blank, but that is what faces Berlin now. The Potsdamer Platz is awash with skyscrapers; the new...
Brunanburh Reconsidered: Kevin Halloran Puts Forward a New Suggestion for the Location of One of the Most Disputed Questions of Anglo-Saxon History: The Site of Athelstan's Great Battle against Alba, Strathclyde and the Vikings
IN AD 937 ONE Or THE MOST DECISIVE battles in British history was fought, between the army of the English king, Athelstan, and the combined forces of Causantin mac Aeda, king of Alba, Owain, king of Strathclyde and Anlaf Guthfrithson, Viking king of...
Caliph Uthman Murdered: June 16th, 656
The first two Caliph, or 'successors' to the Prophet Muhammad, who left no male heir when he died in his early sixties in 632, were Abu Bakr and Umar, who presided over the campaigns which carried Islam outside Arabia into Palestine, Syria, Mesopotamia,...
Coming to Terms with the Past: Soweto, June 16th 1976: Gary Baines Explains That the ANC Government Has Institutionalized Memories of the Soweto Uprising in Its Efforts to Build a New National Identity in South Africa
ON JUNE 16TH, 1976, THE SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE opened fire on a mass march of school students from Soweto, a township southwest of Johannesburg, killing at least twenty-three. What had begun as a peaceful demonstration quickly escalated into a revolt...
England Loses the World Cup: In March 1966, a Few Months before the England Football Team Won the World Cup, the FA Lost It. Martin Atherton Tells the Full, Often Farcical, Story of the Theft and Recovery of the Jules Rimet Trophy
IHE THEFT OF the World Cup in 1966 is one of the most unusual stories in the long history of football. The solid silver trophy, covered in gold plate and with a lapis lazuli plith, had been made in 1930, and between competitions was kept by representatives...
From Kennedy's Cold War to the War on Terror: Gareth Jenkins Looks for Continuities in American Foreign Policy from the 1960s to the 2000s
'THE UNITED STATES IS IN THE EARLY YEARS of a long struggle, similar to what our country faced in the early years of the Cold War. The 20th century witnessed the triumph of freedom over the threats of fascism and communism. Yet a new totalitarian ideology...
It's a Wonderful World: We Are All Invited to Select Seven New Wonders of the World. Mary Beard Investigates the List of Candidates and Reflects on What Makes a Monument a Myth
The result of the competiotion to choose the 'New Seven Wonders of the World' will be announced on January 1st, 2007. On-line voting (through www.new7wonders.com) is already underway on a scale that dwarfs the polling for Pop Idol, let alone Griff...
Kicked into Touch
SOME MOMENTs IN THE PAST are so embedded in popular consciousness that it seems impossible that there could be anything new to say about them. Notoriously, most people over the age of fifty can remember what they were doing when they heard the news...
Marilyn Monroe Marries Arthur Miller: June 29th, 1956
In the early months of 1956 Marilyn Monroe was preparing to star in Bus Stop, discussing with Laurence Olivier a role in The Prince and the Showgirl and romancing Arthur Miller, who was divorcing his wife, Mary. She was also formally changing her name...
Mr Guy's Hospital and the Caribbean: Jane Bowden-Dan Explores Medical Links between the Caribbean and London That Throw Important Light on the Position of Blacks in Eighteenth-Century British Society
The connection between Guy's Hospital and the Caribbean, forged in the first fifty years of the hospital's opening in 1726, are little known. Yet some slaves from British West Indian sugar plantations were sent to the wards of London hospitals such...
New Light on Ancient Egypt: Helen Strudwick, Curator of the Egyptian Galleries at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, Explains the New Refurbishment at the Museum and the Opportunities It Has Afforded
WHEN WILL THE EGYPTIAN GALLERIES be open again?' has been a recurring question at the Fitzwilliam for the last eighteen months, emphasizing both the importance of the collection and the abiding appeal of ancient Egypt. During this period a major project...
Paradise after Hell: Rhiannon Looseley Uncovers the Forgotten History of the Evacuation of over 100,000 French Soldiers from Dunkirk to Britain in May 1940, and Describes What Happened to Them on Their Brief Sojourn across the Channel and Return to France Soon After
'IF WE ARE SAVED, IT IS THANKS to our English brothers, and we will keep a good souvenir in our hearts of the memory that cannot be effaced, above all, of the very warm welcome [sic].' This heartfelt message, left by a French soldier on a school blackboard...
The Ara Pacis: Romans Have Reacted Passionately to the New Presentation of One of the Eternal City's Key Historic Monuments, Charlotte Crow Explains
ONE OF ROME'S MOST SIGNIFICANT MONUMENTS, the Ara Pacis Augustae (Altar of Peace), has recently re-opened to the public, after seven years under wraps, following a controversial project to rehouse it in a building designed by the American architect...
The Black Hole of Calcutta: June 20th, 1756
BY THE END OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY effective power in the Mogul empire had fallen into the hands of the nawabs, or provincial governors, while the British and the French were building up their competing commercial empires in India. The British had...
The Floating World at War: Cartoon Historian Mark Bryant Explores the Visual Satire Emanating from Both Sides of the Conflict between Russia and Japan in the First Decade of the 20th Century
In chronicling the events of the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05--seen by many as the first modern war--the belligerent nations drew on two great graphic traditions. In Japan these were the famous prints of actors and courtesans known as ukiyo-e (Pictures...
The Past of the Future from the Foreign to the Undiscovered Country: David Lowenthal Argues That in Recent Years There Has Been a Retreat from Engagement with Many Aspects of the Past. He Suggests That, in Turn, This Points to an Unwillingness to Contend with the Future
'THE PAST IS A FOREIGN COUNTRY' begins L. P. Hartley s The Go-Between (1953); they do things differently there'. The dawning awareness of that difference some two centuries ago and its subsequent import have engrossed many historians. Less explored...
Tiger Tiger: Susie Green Finds in the Fate of the Last Truly Wild Community of Bengal Tigers a Metaphor for Humanity's Treatment of the Planet
ALMOST THE ONLY PLACE ON EARTH where a few hundred tigers still live a wild life is the mangrove swamps of the Sunderbans in Bengal. But even this last refuge, once known as Baghratatimandal (tiger temple), is being destroyed. The mangroves are being...
What Did Medieval Schools Do for Us? Nicholas Orme Returns to the Classroom to Find out How Boys, and Girls, Were Educated from the Anglo-Saxons to the Tudors; and Finds That the Foundations of Our Education System Were Laid during This Period
THERE ARE FEW WORSE insults than 'medieval', or safer ones, because those who might be offended are no longer with us! Where education is concerned, independent schools, old school buildings, unfashionable subjects like the classics, or strict regimes,...