History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 55, No. 5, May

Abdication of the Emperor Diocletian: May 1st, 305
GAIUS AURELIUS Valerius Diocletianus was sixty years old or so, had been Roman emperor for twenty years and had had enough. He decided to retire and grow vegetables in his home town of Split, on the Dalmatian coast of the Adriatic in Croatia. He had...
Alexandria below the Waves: Russell Chamberlin Describes the Revelations of a Recent Conference on the Archaeology of Cleopatra's Alexandria
IN 1998 FRANCK GODDIO, the French maritime archaeologist electrified the world with stunning underwater photographs of the sunken Royal City of Alexandria. Even veteran archaeologists were moved. Professor Barry Cunliffe of Oxford's School of Archaeology...
Battle of St Albans, 1455: Anthony Pollard, on the 550th Anniversary of the Battle of St Albans, Describes What Happened, and Asks Whether the Battle Should Rightly Be Seen as the Launch of the Wars of the Roses
ON THE MORNING of May 22nd, 1455, three of the greatest lords in England at the head of a formidable force of armed retainers attacked the King's household in the streets of St Albans. They hacked two rival peers to death in front of the King in Holywell...
Brown Is Best: Jamie Oliver Is the Latest in a Long Line of Food Reformers. John Burnett Looks at the Campaign of the Reform Bread League to Improve the Nation's Loaf
THE BREAD REFORM LEAGUE was founded in 1880 by May (Mary Anne) Yates, an amateur artist and member of the Ladies' Sanitary Association. On a visit to Sicily she had admired the fine physique of the peasants who lived principally on brown bread, and...
Cromwell and the Conquest of Jamaica: James Robertson Investigates the Lord Protector's Ambitious Plans for War with Spain in the Caribbean
FOR HISTORIANS TODAY the only thing worse than an exercise in imperialist aggression is a mishandled exercise in imperialist aggression. This month sees the 350th anniversary of the English conquest of Jamaica, which resulted in Jamaica's transformation...
Dine Team: Andy Lynes Announces a New Venture by the Renowned Chef Heston Blumenthal and a Team of Historians Based at Hampton Court Palace Who Specialise in Tudor Cookery
AT FIRST GLANCE, THE SMOKING CAULDRON of liquid nitrogen used by 3-Michelin-star chef Heston Blumenthal to poach his famous dish of green tea and lime sour mousse might seem positively medieval. However there's nothing primitive about his scientific...
Garrison Church, Potsdam: Kevin Kennedy Highlights a Controversial Project to Rebuild a One-Time Prussian 'National Monument'
ON APRIL 14TH, 2005, THE CORNERSTONE will be laid for the reconstruction of the Garrison Church (Garnisonskirche) in Potsdam. An embodiment of 'Prussian values', the church still fuels debate over the Prussian legacy. Here, on March 21st, 1933, 'Potsdam...
General History
Brewer's Britain and Ireland, by John Ayto and Ian Crofton (Cassell, 30 [pounds sterling]) is a dictionary devoted to the historical, linguistic, folkloric, literary, cultural and other associations of 7,000 place-names in Britain and Ireland. The...
John Chester Alias Wryxworth (Fl. 1440s): David Grummitt Introduces One of the Least Known Members of Parliament to Have Been Covered in This Series, but a Man Whose Role as Herald Made Him an Important Figure in Mid-15th Century England
Heralds fulfilled a vital role in the late Middle Ages. Their most important task was in the practice of diplomacy, as representatives of the king, but they were also used more generally to carry messages. Most high-ranking among the heralds were the...
Living with Loss Dealing with Shame: Neil Gregor Looks at Germany and the Legacies of War
IN 1949 THOMAS MANN, the grand old man of German letters, undertook a brief return visit to the homeland from where he had been forced into exile in 1933. During his trip he was taken by civic dignitaries on a tour of what remained of the heavily damaged...
Mali's History at Risk: Sarah Searight Highlights the Problem of Pillaging for Those Trying to Piece Together Mali's Rich Heritage
THE LOOTING OF IRAQI TREASURES has been much in the news since the occupation of that sad country, in spite of the fact that it had been going on for years. The appetite of the international art and antiquities market is insatiable. For a much poorer...
Oop for T' Coop: Sporting Identity in Victorian Britain: As the Climax of the Football Season Approaches, Mike Huggins Investigates the Origins of Britain's Morass of Sporting Rivalries
FROM THE ANCIENT Olympics to soccer's World Cup, sport has offered supporters a means of asserting identity, and its passionate rivalries have often incorporated more fundamental antagonisms. But it was in Victorian Britain that modern patterns of...
Particular Friends: Guy De la Bedoyere, Perhaps Better Known for His Work on Roman Britain, Pursues the Life of John Evelyn, and His Correspondence with Samuel Pepys
I MUST HAVE BEEN about ten when my father gave me a Roman coin. That night I lay in bed galvanized by the palpable sense of all the events that had occurred during the time it had existed. There is no doubt the coin, which I still have, set me on a...
Russia 1905: Beryl Williams Marks the Centenary of the Revolutionary Year 1905, and Discusses the Impact of the Massacre outside the Winter Palace in St Petersburg, and the Complex Events throughout Russia That Preceded and Followed Bloody Sunday
THE CENTENARY OF THE Russian Revolution of 1905 comes as historians are re-evaluating the late tsarist period, and as recently available local archives are throwing new light on the revolutionary year. The term 'revolution' has remained unchallenged,...
Selling Socialism: Marketing the Early Labour Party: Party Strategists Are No New Phenomenon, Dominic Wring Says; the Labour Party Has Always Been Concerned with Marketing Its Brand Image
A MEMO TO TONY BLAIR from chief strategist Philip Gould, published in 2000, described 'New' Labour as a 'contaminated brand'. It graphically underlined the way marketing has come to dominate modern politics. Gould's correspondence further explored...
The Making of a 'Terrorist': Mihir Bose Investigates the Case of Subhas Chandra Bose in Bengal in 1924 to Show What Can Happen When a Government Is Able to Lock People Up on the Suspicion of Terrorism
EIGHTY YEARS AGO the British Raj used laws that are almost a mirror image of the anti-terrorism legislation recently passed by the British Parliament to detain suspects without charge. The 'lawless laws', as an Indian politician called them, were used...
The Sea Speaks Arabic: Umej Bhatia Discusses Muslim Memories of the Crusades and Their Resonances in Middle Eastern Politics Today
ON DECEMBER 11TH, 1917, eight centuries after the Kurdish warrior-general Saladin expelled the Crusaders from the holy city of Jerusalem, a British-led Egypt expeditionary force overcame its beleaguered Turkish defenders. The holy city had changed...
The Warsaw Pact Is Signed: May 14th, 1955
THE TREATY OF Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance concluded after three days of discussions in Warsaw created a belated eastern military counterpart to the western powers' North Atlantic Treaty Organization. In particular, it was a reaction...
Tomorrow's History: Made in the North East
http://www.tomorrows-history.com A look at a recent local history web initiative in the North-East to mark Local History Month, which this year runs from May 1st to June 5th. Tomorrow's History: Made in the North East is an online regional local...
Vote for the Past
MAY 2005 IS GOING TO BE NOTEWORTHY for at least two reasons--the general election and the 60th anniversary of the end of the war in Europe. VE Day will be one of those confected occasions on which we are supposed tn be proud to be British, the vogue...
'You and I Will Eat Grass ...': As the Rest of Britain Gears Up for the Sixtieth Anniversary of VE Day on May 8th, Peter Tabb Describes the Last Moments of the German Occupation of the Channel Islands, Where the End of the War Came Twenty-Four Hours Later
ON MAY 8TH, 1945, GERMANY surrendered unconditionally but a day later 60,000 British citizens faced the prospect of naval and aerial bombardment by their own side as the commander-in-chief of the German-occupied Channel Islands demanded instead an...