History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 58, No. 8, August

A Prophet in His Own Country: Rebecca Abrams Discovers the History of a Forgotten Aberdonian Doctor Who Could-If Anyone Had Listened to His Ideas-Have Saved the Lives of Countless Women in Childbirth over the Following Centuries
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Ever since I was a child and first learnt about Leonardo da Vinci's designs for helicopters that it wouldn't be possible to build for another three centuries, I have been fascinated by scientific prophets. It is not just a...
Editor's Letter
I am proud to say that this is the 126th issue of History Today that I have edited, but sorry to say that it is the last. It has been an enormous privilege, a huge pleasure and an endlessly stimulating challenge to produce this magazine. The last ten...
Free the Planet: Jean-Francois Mouhot Traces a Link between Climate Change and Slavery, and Suggests That Reliance on Fossil Fuels Has Made Slave Owners of Us All
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Most of us approach slavery with the underlying assumption that our modern civilization is morally far superior to the barbaric slave-owning societies of the past. But are we really so different? If we compare our current...
Gone with the Wind: Mark Juddery Examines the Impact and Appeal of the Film That Has Sold More Tickets at at the US Box Office Than Any Other
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Even compared with other military conflicts, the American Civil War of 1861-65 tends to inspire particular obsession. The conflict, which divided a nation and led to 600,000 deaths, holds a special place in US folklore. The...
Hadrian and the Limits of Empire: The Emperor Hadrian Presided over the Roman Empire at Its Height, Defined Its Borders and Was One of the Most Cultured Rulers of the Ancient World. Neil Faulkner Revisits His Legacy, as the British Museum Opens a Major Exhibition on His Life and Times
President Bush's failure to impose his imperial vision on Iraq and the rest of the Middle East may come to be seen as one of the great turning points in history. He would have been wise to have studied and learned lessons from the experiences in the...
Months Past: The Source of the Nile; the Pact to End War; and the Fall of the Hospitallers: Richard Cavendish Introduces This Month's Anniversaries
AUG 3 1858 The Nile's Source Discovered John Harming Speke, an army officer's son from the West Country, was commissioned into the army of the East India Company in 1844 at the age of seventeen. In 1854 he eagerly joined an expedition to east...
Munich: York Membery Visits the Capital of Bavaria and Explores the Historic Heart of This Twenty-First Century Metropolis-And Its Annual Beer Festival
It is hard to believe, looking down on Munich from the top of St Peter's, the city's oldest parish church, that the city spread-eagled below lay in ruins in 1945 at the end of the Second World War. Having clambered up the 297 steps to the top of the...
Peeping John: Jacqui Livesey Unmasks the Cleric Who Revealed Lord Nelson and Lady Hamilton's Most Intimate Secrets
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] For almost two hundred years, the identity of the author of Lady Hamilton's first biography has remained a mystery. Published soon after her death in 1815, the infamous book revealed the true nature of the relationship between...
Prague's Spring: Michael Simmons Draws on Many Years Experience of Living in, and Reporting from, Central Europe to Look Back at the Upheavals in Czechoslovakia of 1968
Seven years on from the Soviet-led invasion of what was then Czechoslovakia, the poker-faced authorities in Prague still felt the need to justify the trauma that had shaken their country. 'With Soviet help,' said a guidebook published in 1975, 'Czechoslovak...
Radical Light: Italy's Divisionist Painters: Lucy Riall Explores the Social and Political Issues in Italy Following the Country's Unification. She Shows How These Issues Became the Focus for a Dynamic New Artistic Movement of the 1890s, Divisionism, a Forerunner to Futurism and the Subject of a Current Exhibition at the National Gallery
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Enthusiasm for Italian art is nothing new but until quite recently the art of the 'Ottocento' (1800s) was either ignored or forgotten: seen as a symptom of Italy's cultural decline since the glories of the Renaissance or as...
Saving the Nation: Peter Furtado Joins the Celebrations of the Victorian Society as It Commemorates Half a Century of Defending the Country's Nineteenth-Century Heritage
The Victorian Society, which has done so much to preserve the endangered fabric of the nineteenth century--most famously saving St Pancras Hotel from demolition in 1966--was founded in 1958 by leading lights such as John Betjeman (1906-84) and Nikolaus...
Streicher, Fips & der Sturmer: Mark Bryant Looks at the Cartoons That Adorned One of the Nazis' Most Reviled Newspapers
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Julius Streicher was notorious not only as the fanatical bull-necked, whip-wielding 'Beast of Nuremberg', who organized the first annual Nazi rally in the city in 1927, but also as the founder of the virulently anti-semitic...
The General and the Journalist: Tobias Grey Meets the Journalist Who Was at Charles De Gaulle's Side for Twenty-Six Years
Never short of a bon mot, Charles de Gaulle was particularly creative when it came to journalists, especially French ones. 'Mr It's-got-to-go-wrong' was his pet name for Hubert Beuve-Mery, the journalist who founded Le Monde, the French newspaper of...
The Last Valois: A Tragic Story: Robert Knecht Describes the Shortcomings of Henry III, the Last Valois King, and the Circumstances That Led Him to Become the First-But Not the Last-French Monarch to Die at the Hands of One of His Subjects
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] On July 31st, 1589, a young Jacobin j friar, Jacques Clement, left Paris for the suburb of Saint-Cloud where Henry III of France had set up his military encampment. The capital was held by the Catholic League, an armed association...
Turn Your Papers Over: Andrew Watts Has Investigated the Archives of the Cambridge Examination Syndicate to Uncover the History of School Exams
As students digest their GCSE and A-Level results, they might be surprised to learn that the origins of the examination system date back 150 years to the 'Locals' set for the first time by Oxford University in June 1858, and by Cambridge University...
Under the Mushroom Cloud: The Cold War Has Become This Year's Hot Media Topic. Taylor Downing Welcomes the Chance to Look More Critically at the Era of 'Mutually Assured Destruction'
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] What do the folloxving have in common: Tom Hanks' latest film; the winner of the 2007 Regional Visitor Attraction of the Year Award; a Channel 4 programme broadcast earlier this year; and the V&A autumn exhibition: All...
Wish You Were Here? Britain between the Wars: Martin Pugh Argues That Life during the Interwar Years Was Brighter Than Has Often Been Suggested, in Spite of Its Association with Economic Depression and the Rise of Fascism
The social history of interwar Britain has been heavily coloured by economics and politics. It often presents a gloomy picture of a society dogged by mass unemployment and class conflict, punctuated by futile protests such as the General Strike and...