History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 50, No. 8, August

A Whiff of Roman London
A NEW EXHIBITION, High Street Londinium, at the Museum of London challenges existing notions about Roman London, promising visitors a chance to see, touch, even smell it, as it really was. Far from the impressive stone edifices, mosaics and bath houses...
Britain 1500
Steven Gunn looks at the condition of Britain at the beginning of the Tudor era, and finds a society that was increasingly cohesive, confident and cosmopolitan. BRITAIN IN 1500 WAS for the most part an old-settled but, by the standards of much of...
Charles Ralph Boxer
HE LIVED FOR ALMOST the entire twentieth century and died not too many miles from his birthplace in the south of England. But in between, he saw the world from a perspective shared by few. From his assignment in a Japanese Army regiment as a young...
Chinese Burns Britain in China 1842-1900
Robert Bickers shows how the history of British and European imperialism in China helps explain the ferocious Boxer War of 1900. THE BOXER RISING began in the obscurity of the north-west regions of China's Shandong province in 1899. It finished...
Free Information
Harriet Jones considers the impact of the new Freedom of Information Act on students of contemporary history. WE SHALL FINALLY GAIN a statutory right to freedom of information in the United Kingdom this summer, when the Freedom of Information Act...
From Sparky to Boney
David Chandler describes his first encounters with matters military that led him to abandon his plans to join the clergy to become a military historian WHY DID I BECOME a young military historian? To ask such a question is rather like asking Pontius...
Hadrian's Wallsend
RECENT EXCAVATIONS BY NEWCASTLE University of the remains of Segedunum, the enormous fort marking the extreme eastern end of Hadrian's Wall, have resulted in what has been claimed to be the most detailed examination of a fort throughout the entire...
History at University 2000
THIS IS AN OPPORTUNE MOMENT, amid continuing controversy about the universities, to consider history in higher education. Is the discipline becoming a minority interest, as the Jeremiahs have long been predicting? And how is the battle between `traditionalists'...
History in the Media
News The site of the largest Roman civilian settlement within the Hadrian's Wall world heritage site has been identified near the Cumbrian town of Mary-port. The town, extending for nearly a quarter of a mile, indicates the importance of the north-west...
Krakow 2000
THE POLISH CITY OF KRAKOW, with its royal castle and cathedral, its medieval university and market square, has always been a centre of political, religious, educational and commercial interest. This year, as one of the European Cities of Culture, this...
Letters
Declaring Intent I read with a strange sense of nostalgia Richard Cavendish's article `Who Started Korea' (Months Past, June). I was District Commissioner of a remote station in what is now Zambia at the time, and turned on my radio to an American...
Living Heritage
Mike Corbishley explains how English Heritage, custodian of much of the best of England built historical environment, makes the past accessible to young minds. ENCOURAGING CHILDREN to think about history is surely one of the most important aspects...
Monstrous Acts
BESTIALITY IN EARLY MODERN ENGLAND Erica Fudge explores a shift in attitudes towards bestiality in the sixteenth century and how this impinged on wider issues concerning human status. IN 1670 THOMAS RIGG OF Hadmore in the North Riding of Yorkshire...
Region of Eternal Fire
Sarah Searight finds that, in the past as in the present, Caspian oil has' produced political conflict as well as economic development. CASPIAN OIL IS MUCH in the news these days, with some thirty international oil companies, led by BP and Amoco,...
State Trials
AFTER YEARS OF BEING LOCKED AWAY in libraries and antiquarian bookshops, the legal records of the State Trials have at last entered the electronic era. The State Trials on CD-ROM is a major publishing project this summer. For the first time the contents...
Sweep Them off the Streets
John Marriott looks at attitudes to the London poor since the seventeenth century. RECENT PUBLICITY over the numbers of those sleeping rough on the streets of London has served to remind us that the poor are not only still with us but continue to...
The Death of Jose San Martin August 17th, 1850
The two leading figures of the South American wars of independence were Simon Bolivar in the north and Jose de San Martin in the south. Their paths met in Ecuador, where the modest and unselfish San Martin came off second best. While he is honoured...
The Death of William Rufus August 2nd, 1100
THE FULLEST contemporary account of the death of William II of England, while hunting in the New Forest, comes from William of Malmesbury, a monk who was the leading chronicler of his day. He says that the King had an ominous dream the night before...
The Good, the Bad & the Ugly: POLICING AMERICA
Wilbur Miller investigates the historical background to law enforcement in the United States AMERICAN POLICE FORCES, IN the modern sense of patrols to prevent and detect crime and maintain general order, are products of the nineteenth century. Like...
The Gowrie Conspiricy August 5th, 1600
Ungainly, slobbering, a physical coward buthighly intelligent, James vi of Scots, the future James I of England, was at Falkland that Tuesday morning when he informed his courtiers that Alexander Ruthven, younger brother of John Ruthven, Earl of Gowrie,...