History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 52, No. 10, October

A Little of Leonidas. (Letters)
Paul Cartledge's catalogue of coming events in the Year of Sparta (August 2002) makes the mouth of every Antipodean admirer of the peculiar Peloponnesian polis water in envy. Your August cover was enough to cause a quickening of the pulse, and Professor...
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Apocalypse: The Great Jewish Revolt against Rome, 66-73 CE; Neil Faulkner Sees the Destruction of Jerusalem and Fall of Masada in the 1st Century as the Result of a Millenarian Movement That Sought to Escape the Injustices of an Evil Empire
`THIS IS THE MASADA of the Palestinians', an anonymous Israeli general is supposed to have said at the height of the battle for the Jenin refugee camp on the West Bank in April 2002. New recruits to the Israeli Defence Force regularly swear an oath...
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Asians in Britain: 400 Years of History
Rozina Visram Pluto Press, 488pp, 15.99 pb [pounds sterling] & 50hb [pounds sterling], ISBN 0 7453 13787 hb; 0 7453 1373 6 pb; HISTORY TODAY BOOKSHOP PRICE 13.99 [pounds sterling] paperback SINCE SEPTEMBER 11TH there has been a fair amount...
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Desert Warfare: Jo Woolley and David Smurthwaite of the National Army Museum Look at Desert Warfare in the Second World War and More Widely
THE BRITISH ARMY'S involvement in desert warfare, which culminated in the North African campaigns of the Second World War, had long antecedents. In the nineteenth century the Army's presence in Africa was primarily influenced by the need to preserve...
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El Alamein, the People's Battle: Michael Paris Describes the Film Record of the North African Victory, and How the Footage Represents a Tour De Force in Terms of Wartime Documentary and National Effort
ON JUNE 10TH, 1940, Italy declared war on Britain and France--`a mean skulking thing to do', wrote Harold Nicolson to his wife, Vita Sackville-West, and likened the Italians to those who `rob corpses on the battlefield'. But for Mussolini, hoping...
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First British Atomic Bomb Test: October 3rd, 1952. (Months Past)
BRITAIN DEVELOPED its own atom bomb to remain a great power and avoid complete dependence on the United States, which was refusing to share atomic information. A secret cabinet committee discussed the question in October 1946, with Hugh Dalton and...
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Florida: Front-Line State in 1962: Mark Weisenmiller Explains How, Forty Years Ago, the `Sunshine State' Played a Pivotal Role in the Cuban Missile Crisis. (Cross Current)
THE CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS of forty years ago lasted from October 16th, 2002, when US President John F. Kennedy was informed that the Soviet Union was building and maintaining missiles and atomic weapons in Cuba, to November 1st, when the missiles...
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French Connection: Philip Ziegler Tells How a Chance Invitation to a Loire Chateau Set Him En Route to Becoming a Historical Biographer. (Point of Departure)
I STILL REMEMBER the opening sentence of my first school report after I had become a history specialist. `Ziegler', the master concerned observed, `will never make a historian.' I have never had cause to doubt the accuracy of this perceptive judgement....
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God and the Normans: David Crouch Reconsiders William I and His Sons as Men of Genuine Piety-As Well as Soldiers
WHENEVER THE knights of the Duke of Normandy cantered across the battlefields of Europe and the Near East, they advertised their presence and their nationality by shouting `Dex aie!' (God our help!). Alone among the French, the Normans claimed by...
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Kazan Falls to Ivan the Terrible: October 2nd, 1552. (Months Past)
THE GRAND Principality of Moscow gained its independence from the Mongol Golden Horde in the fifteenth century under Ivan III, the Great, who vastly extended Muscovite territory. His grandson Ivan IV, already known in his own time as the Terrible...
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Making Ireland British, 1580-1650
Nicholas Canny Oxford University Press xiv+633pp 55 [pounds sterling] ISBN 0 19 820091 9 HISTORY TODAY BOOKSHOP PRICE 50 [pounds sterling] THIS IS A WONDERFUL work, richly layered and contextualised. Taking some of the wider boundaries within...
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Museum of the British Empire and Commonwealth. (Frontline)
A NEW MUSEUM OPENS in Bristol this month. Some ten years in the making, the British Empire and Commonwealth Museum offers the public an accessible history of the British empire and its many legacies. It confronts controversial issues such as racism,...
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Music at the Horniman Museum. (Frontline)
IN 1901, TOWARDS THE END of a full life, Frederick Horniman, the Victorian tea merchant, Liberal politician, collector and public benefactor gave his newly built museum to the people of London for their `recreation, instruction and enjoyment'. Horniman...
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Natalie Zemon Davis: Daniel Snowman Meets the Historian of `Martin Guerre'. (Today's History).(Interview)
WHAT IS HISTORY? What is it about and how should it be portrayed? Such questions are much in the air these days. But few have examined them more consistently and imaginatively than Natalie Zemon Davis. Widely revered as (variously) a leading historian...
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Seeing Some Black in the Union Jack: Craig Spence Uncovers Records of Black and Asian Sailors in the Pictorial Archives of the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich
OVER THE LAST 300 years or so tens of thousands of black and Asian sailors have crewed British ships (Board of Trade figures for the period 1901-38, for example, indicate an annual `lascar' population on British ships of between 37,000 and 56,000)....
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St Deiniol's Library. (Frontline)
FOUNDED IN 1889 BY William Ewart Gladstone, St Deiniol's Library is Britain's only residential library, an architectural gem nestling in the Welsh borderlands, six miles from Chester. Four times prime minister, four times Chancellor of the Exchequer...
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The Birth of Richard III: October 2nd 1452. (Months Past).(Biography)
THE BABY WAS born at one of his mother's favourite residences, Fotheringhay Castle in Northamptonshire, the fourth and youngest son of his family. His older brothers were Edward, who was ten, Edmund, nine, and George, four. Descended on both sides...
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The Black Widows of Liverpool: Angela Brabin Uncovers the Gruesome Tale of Serial Murder Committed by a Group of Women in the Poorest Districts of 19th-Century Liverpool
MARGARET HIGGINS, AGED 41, and her sister Catherine Flanagan (55) were both hanged at Kirkdale Gaol in Liverpool on March 3rd, 1884, executed for the murder of Thomas Higgins, Margaret's husband. The trial the previous month had been a sensation,...
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The British Museum: 250 Years on. (Frontline)
IN 2003 THE BRITISH MUSEUM celebrates its 250th anniversary. To coincide with this occasion a former Director, David Wilson, has written a major new history of the Museum. The death of Sir Hans Sloane, at the age of ninety-two, on January 11th,...
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The Creation of a Legend.(black Woman Sailor William Brown)
A LEGEND IS OFTEN a wonderful story of a hero or a heroine who surmounts impossible odds. At the root, there is generally some basis of fact which over time evolves into a grander story. One comparatively recent legend tells of William Brown, a...
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The Cripps Version: The Life of Sir Stafford Cripps
Peter Clarke Allen Lane 572 pp 25 [pounds sterling] ISBN 0713 99390 1 HISTORY TODAY BOOKSHOP PRICE 20 [pounds sterling] IN THE BEGINNING GOD MADE MAN, followed by woman and tobacco. Then, thinking He'd done too much for man, He made Sir Stafford...
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The Crown's Servants: Government and Civil Service under Charles II, 1660-1685
Gerald Aylmer Oxford University Press, 2002 Pp xvi+303 40 [pounds sterling] ISBN 0 19 820826 X HISTORY TODAY BOOKSHOP PRICE 35 [pounds sterling] IT IS AMAZING what a thin white-collar line stood between Charles II and disaster. Beneath the...
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The Pankhursts
Martin Pugh Allen Lane, The Penguin Press xviii+537pp, 20 [pounds sterling] hb, 8.99 [pounds sterling] pb ISBN 0 713 99439 8 hb; 0 140 29038 9 pb THIS READABLE BOOK explores the lives of the remarkable Pankhurst women before, during and after...
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