Journal of Social History

The Journal of Social History is a scholarly journal covering research in social history, social science and genealogy from all periods worldwide. The Journal of Social History is published quarterly by George Mason University in Fairfax, Va. Peter N. Stearns is the editor.

Articles from Vol. 44, No. 2, Winter

"Africa Joins the World": The Missionary Imagination and the Africa Motion Picture Project in Central Africa, 1937-9
Introduction The lights in the church flashed back on as the final credits brought the film to a close. "It [was] better than a dozen missionary addresses," one pastor declared enthusiastically, while another pontificated, "it ought to be shown...
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Art out of Place: International Art Exhibits at the New York World's Fair of 1964-1965
At its opening on April 22, 1964, the New York World's Fair was already one of the most ambitious fairs ever held. Covering 646 acres, the fair included eighty countries, twenty-four states, and fifty corporations represented in a variety of pavilions....
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"Culture-a-Go-Go": The Ghirardelli Square Sculpture Controversy and the Liberation of Civic Design in the 1960s
The evening that noted chef Julia Child fell into the men's room at a boisterous celebration in San Francisco's brand-new historic redevelopment Ghirardelli Square, a number of realms converged--in urban design, the arts, civic life, and commerce--and...
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Culture of Remembrance in Late Choson Korea: Bringing an Unknown War Hero Back into History
Numerous scholarly works have been produced on "memory projects" as the culture and politics of nation-states in the modern world. Yet remaking of the past is not the monopoly of modernity. This paper investigates the problem of engineering memory...
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Exhibiting Identity: Latin America between the Imaginary and the Real
The place where art is exhibited affects the perception of an artwork as it implicitly speaks about who selects and supports the display. The exhibition space can legitimize or discredit the artifacts it is exhibiting; it can establish or deny their...
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Microcosms of Democracy: Imagining the City Neighborhood in World War II-Era America
In 1943, the left-wing screenwriter Herbert Clyde Lewis dropped by his boyhood neighborhood, Bedford-Stuyvesant in central Brooklyn, following an absence of several decades. After a string of minor successes as a novelist, Lewis had recently moved...
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"No Fertile Soil for Pathogens": Rayon, Advertising, and Biopolitics in Late Weimar Germany
Introduction When Kunstseide (artificial silk), or rayon, entered the consumer market following the First World War, it was nothing short of revolutionary. (1) The new fabric, which looked and felt like real silk for as little as half its price,...
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Section 1 Arts and Cities: Sculpted Landscapes: Art & Place in Cleveland's Cultural Gardens, 1916-2006
The long-dormant Cleveland Cultural Gardens flowered in 2006, with the unveiling of a 10-foot memorial to Mahatma Gandhi as the centerpiece of the newly developed India Cultural Garden. Accompanied by dancers and a small but boisterous crowd the new...
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Section III Regional Topics: How to Make an Anarchist-Terrorist: An Essay on the Political Imaginary in Fin-De-Siecle France
My subject is the debate that surrounded the anarchist-terrorists of France in the last decade of the nineteenth century. In the 1890s, as bombs and rumors of bombs overthrew the news of the day, French men and women grappled with the meaning of this...
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Section II Placing the Foreign in the Arts of the U.S.: Public Art at the Global Crossroads: The Politics of Place in 1930S Los Angeles
The relationship of art to place is pronounced in Los Angeles, A world center for the production and projection of visual culture, the city has a long history of investing in its own representational imagery for the purposes of civic promotion and...
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Special Issue: The Arts in Place an Introduction
In April 2007, eight scholars gathered at the Rockefeller Archive Center in Sleepy Hollow, NY, to talk about the "arts in place." Or out of place. Or no place. Or everywhere. Such was the wide-ranging conversation that began with the objective to ground...
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Streets and Stages: Urban Renewal and the Arts after World War II
In 1970, just a year after the completion of the final building, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in Manhattan began offering programs in the plaza that sat between the Metropolitan Opera, the New York Stare Theater, and Philharmonic Hall (later...
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