Newsweek International

Newsweek International is a consumer magazine covering general interest issues with editorial content. Newsweek Inc. publishes this periodical weekly. Fareed Zakaria is the Editor.

Articles from July 4

A Latin Al-Jazeera? Chavez Puts Money into a Regional News Network
Byline: Phil Gunson On paper, at least, Telesur sounds like an idea whose time has come. Until now, Spanish-speaking Latin Americans who wanted to watch an international all-news network broadcasting in their language have had a limited menu to...
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A Mixed Message; under Pressure from the Religious Right, Is Musharraf Backsliding on Civil Reforms?
Byline: Zahid Hussain When Pakistan president Pervez Musharraf seized power in 1999, he rather quickly revealed some reformist instincts. He pushed to enact a law reserving 30 percent of the seats in Parliament and local government for women, and...
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A New Kind of Company; Tata Coddles Workers, Not Managers, Keeps Its Distance from Wall Street-Yet Thrives in Brutal Global Industries as a Uniquely Indian Kind of Multinational
Byline: George Wehrfritz and Ron Moreau (With Sumeet Chatterjee in Mumbai) A new kind of multinational corporation is emerging out of India, the hot newcomer in the global economy. It is the Tata Group, a family conglomerate that has gone professional...
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Big Brother Is Watching; A Journalist Retraces George Orwell's Steps in Burma
Byline: Malcolm Jones George Orwell spent five years as one of the British Empire's policemen in Burma in the '20s. The experience provided him with the raw material for his novel "Burmese Days" as well as several of his best essays. It also soured...
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Bleak House, Moscow; Red Tape and Xenophobia Block Foreign Adoptions
Byline: Kevin O'Flynn From their farmhouse in New Hampshire, Dan and Joanne Berard e-mail Christina, the deaf girl in Moscow they hope will become their adopted daughter. Christina is 18 years old but has the mental age of a 6-year-old. The Berards...
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Cutthroat Classes; A New College-Admissions System Is Fueling Stress
Byline: B. J. Lee At the age of 16, Lee Hyuk Joon's life is a living hell. The South Korean 10th grader gets up at 6 in the morning to go to school, and studies most of the day until returning home at 6 p.m. After dinner, it's time to hit the books...
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Family Feuds: Colliding Sons; as Ratan Tata Banged His Conglomerate into Shape, Others Were Falling Apart
Byline: Sumeet Chatterjee and Ron Moreau Just because Tata Sons is thriving doesn't mean that Indian family conglomerates have a bright future. Indeed one key reason Tata works is that it's not really a family company. Chairman Ratan Tata has no...
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Fashionistas 1, Morals Police 0
Byline: Ladane Nasseri I've spent more than two thirds of my life in fashionable capitals: Paris, London, New York. For a time I worked on the Champs-Elysees, developing ad campaigns for an international clothes designer. As a 30-year-old Iranian,...
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Hobby Farmers: The New Peasants; Spurred by a Yearning for the Rustic Life, Professionals Are Fleeing Busy Cities and Revitalizing the British Countryside
Byline: William Underhill Wilfred Emmanuel-Jones was a teenager before he saw his first cow in his first field. Born in Jamaica, the 47-year-old grew up in inner-city Birmingham before making a career as a television producer and launching his own...
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Into the Woods; Economics and Declining Birthrates Are Pushing Large Swaths of Europe Back to Their Primeval State, with Wolves Taking the Place of People
Byline: Stefan Theil (With Mike Elkin in Madrid, William Underhill in London, Eric Pape in Paris,and Wojciech Rogacin in Warsaw) Germans are getting used to a new kind of immigrant. In 1998, a pack of wolves crossed the shallow Neisse River on the...
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Periscope
Byline: Michael Isikoff, Allan Sloan, Michael Hastings, Rana Foroohar, Karen Lowry Miller, Joe Cochrane, Lorraine Ali, Eve Conant Terror: Wrongful Arrests? Since 9/11, the U.S. Justice Department has used a little-known legal tactic to secretly...
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Philippe Baudillon; Hitting the Homestretch
Byline: Eric Pape Philippe Baudillon has had a varied career. He spent a dozen years in France's diplomatic corps, assisted in failed efforts to bring the Olympics to Paris in 1992, ran a French television channel and acted as a diplomatic adviser...
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Sarkozy Makes His Move; Chirac's Interior Minister and Rival Sees Opportunity in the 'Non' Vote, and Is Hurrying to Seize It
Byline: Eric Pape (With Tracy McNicoll in Paris) Among the few political giants left standing after France's overwhelming "non" to the European Union constitutional treaty was the famously pugnacious--and diminutive--Nicolas Sarkozy. The most popular...
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Saving Grace; Few Had Ever Heard of Antonio Palocci When He Became Minister of the Biggest Economy in Latin America. but He's Now the Anchor of a Scandal-Plagued Government
Byline: Mac Margolis Running Latin America's largest nation has never been for the fainthearted, but these have been especially vexing times for Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva. Since late May the charismatic Brazilian president has seen the tide of a...
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The River Tells Its Story; China Aims to Preserve Its Yangtze Heritage with a Compelling New Museum Showcasing Relics from the Three Gorges
Byline: Craig Simons The four-meter-tall gate that dominates the atrium of the new Three Gorges Museum has come a long way--through time, rather than over distance. Carved during the Han dynasty (206 B.C.- A.D. 220), it was erected among farmers'...
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Tip Sheet
Byline: Sana Butler, Sonia Kolesnikov-Jessop, Emily Flynn, Yepoka Yeebo Travel: In Search Of The Perfect Cup Coffee has come a long way since it was sold mainly freeze-dried in cans. So it was only a matter of time before coffee drinkers began...
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