The Art Bulletin

The Art Bulletin publishes scholarship in all aspects of art history as practiced in the academy, museums, and other institutions. The Art Bulletin publishes peer-reviewed scholarly articles and reviews in the area of art history.

Articles from Vol. 85, No. 3, September

Domenico Ghirlandaio: Artist and Artisan
JEAN K. CADOGAN Domenico Ghirlandaio: Artist and Artisan New Haven: Yale University Press, 2000. 384 pp.; 90 color ills., 56 b/w. $70.00The monumental fresco decorations of the Sassetti Chapel, the Tornabuoni Chapel, and the Sala dei Gigli in the Palazzo...
Giovanni Baglione: Artistic Reputation in Baroque Rome
MARYVELMA SMITH O'NEIL Giovanni Baglione: Artistic Reputation in Baroque Rome Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 428 pp.; 15 color ills., 108 b/w. $130.00Recent monographic studies of seicento artists, such as Richard Spear's on Guido Reni...
Iconoclash: Beyond the Image Wars in Science, Religion, and Art
BRUNO LATOUR AND PETER WEIBEL, EDS. Iconoclash: Beyond the Image Wars in Science, Religion, and, Art Karlsruhe: Center for Art and Media; Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2002. 703 pp., 300 color ills., 535 b/w. $45.00 paper Massive in size and weight, but...
Meyer Schapiro in Silos: Pursuing an Iconography of Style
The great interest of the Marxist approach lies not only in the attempt to interpret historically changing relations of art and economic life in the light of a general theory of society but also in the weight given to the differences and conflicts within...
Robert Smithson: Learning from New Jersey and Elsewhere
ANN REYNOLDS Robert Smithson: Learning from New Jersey and Elsewhere Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2003. 371 pp., 10 color ills., 81 b/w. $39.95Common sense suggests that the mirror is a figure of plenitude. Standing before its reflective surface we are...
Ruben's France: Gender and Personification in the Marie De Medicis Cycle
Peter Paul Rubens's cycle of twenty-four monumental paintings representing the life and deeds of the dowager queen Marie de Medicis of France presents one of the best-known and frequently debated allegorical displays in early modern European painting.1...
The Anatomy of Nature: Geology and American Landscape Painting, 1825-1875 / Man Made: Thomas Eakins and the Construction of Gilded-Age Manhood / Winslow Homer: The Nature of Observation / the Body of Raphaelle Peale: Still Life and Selfhood, 1812-1824
REBECCA BEDELL The Anatomy of Nature: Geology and American Landscape Painting, 1825-1875 Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002. 192 pp.; 26 color ills., 55 b/w. $45.00; $35.00 paperMARTIN A. BERGER Man Made: Thomas Eakins and the Construction of...
The End of the American Century: Current Scholarship on the Art of the United States
In cribbing my title from Henry R. Luce's famous Life magazine essay of 1941, I begin with more than one paradox. Luce wrote of an "American Century" that had not fully taken place. Frustrated by isolationist political sentiment and what he perceived...
The "Return" of Religion in the Scholarship of American Art
Emanuel Leutze's best-known work is that standard of American history painting, Washington Crossing the Delaware, completed in 1851.1 The image is one of a loosely related cluster of paintings in which Leutze (1816-1868) explored the origins of American...
Two Waldorf-Astorias: Spatial Economies as Totem and Fetish
[At the Waldorf-Astoria] you are in presence of a revelation of the possibilities of the hotel-for which the American spirit has found so unprecedented a use and a value; leading it on to express so a social, indeed positively an aesthetic ideal, and...
Vermeer's Wager: Speculations on Art History, Theory and Art Museums / an Entrance for the Eyes: Space and Meaning in Seventeenth-Century Dutch Art / Vermeer and the Invention of Seeing
IVAN GASKELL Vermeer's Wager: Speculations on Art History, Theory and Art Museums London: Reaktion Books, 2000. 270 pp.; 1 color ill., 82 b/w. $27.00MARTHA HOLLANDER An Entrance for the Eyes: Space and Meaning in Seventeenth-Century Dutch Art Berkeley:...
"You Who Once Were Far Off": Enlivening Scripture in the Main Portal at Vezelay
The great sculpted portals of Romanesque France reemerged as objects of more than local interest around the middle of the nineteenth century.1 Ever since that time, churchgoers, tourists, and students of art history alike have recorded their admiration...