American Journalism Review

Trade journal reporting on broadcast and print journalism. For Trade and Professional audiences.

Articles from Vol. 21, No. 3, April

A Bold, Promising Move to Morning
A revamped JOA could strengthen both the Seattle Times and Post-Intelligencer. Recent history demonstrates that when two competing newspapers enter into a joint operating agency, there is no guarantee both papers will survive. Often the weaker paper,...
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A Campus Newspaper War in Wisconsin
A dam Lasker does his best to conceal his glee. On his desk in the narrow, windowless basement office of the Daily Cardinal at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Lasker, the editor, has set aside a February 26 edition of the rival Badger Herald....
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A Familiar Ring
Some telephone numbers are considered trademarks and are entitled to legal protection. Telephone numbers may be protected as trademarks, and a competitor's use of a similar telephone number may be forbidden as trademark infringement. Vanity names...
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Ajr Asks
What are some of your favorite words? MIKE JACOBS, editor, North Dakota's Grand Forks Herald "I like words that start with the `wh' sound, like who, what and why, but my very favorite is wheat." TOM HALLMAN JR., staff writer, Portland's Oregonian...
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An Olympian Scandal
How a local TV news story in Salt Lake City led to the disclosure of far-reaching corruption in the way Olympic sites are chosen. CHRIS VANOCUR IS NO STRANGER TO THE FAMOUS-father syndrome. Throughout his career as a television journalist, people...
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A Tough Call for the Nation's Editors
When the Associated Press and Washington Post stories about Juanita Broaddrick began moving on the wire late February 19, editors at the San Jose Mercury News knew they were in for another round of tough decision-making. The wire stories, which...
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A TV Station and a Newspaper Join Forces
With more televisions than newspapers in homes these days, it's little wonder a print outlet would want to call a broadcast counterpart an ally--rather than a competitor--in the quest for news. Now, instead of worrying about being scooped by the local...
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Bylines
Move Over, Dear Abby "Dear Al, Now that Monicagate is sort of over, I can't find any political coverage that interests me. My new corrupted self is longing for those tawdry and torrid details I once found offensive. Aren't there more sex-in-politics...
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Easy to Do, but Often Worthless
"People on the street" interviews add little to a news broadcast. One of the most inane, worthless and overused story techniques in radio and television news is the "people on the street" interview: Three or four people give their opinions on a...
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Letters
Lovelady's Magic ONE NOTABLE OMISSION IN LORI ROBERTson's "Reversal of Fortune" (March): John Huey and Norman Pearlstine envisioned the sharp, new Fortune. But the guy they called in to hone the content was Steve Lovelady, another Wall Street Journal...
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Log Cabin Online
In the log cabin he built himself on a 30-acre homestead just north of the Vermont-Quebec border, John Mahoney is reviving old-time local newspaper traditions with a little help from technology and a lot of folksy news sense. At www.tomifobia.com,...
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Over the Edge?
Is writing attitude and edge a laudable device to make news reports more compelling? Or does it pose a serious threat to journalism's core values--and credibility? UTTER THE WORDS "ATTITUDE AND EDGE" TO A journalist, any journalist, and try to anticipate...
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Paying for It
IT WAS ONE OF THE MOST BRAZEN MOMENTS IN the not-altogether-distinguished history of checkbook journalism. Last October, Hustler magazine Publisher Larry Flynt placed an ad in the Washington Post offering up to $1 million to anyone who could prove...
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Playing to Their Strengths
Depth and context are newspapers' key advantages. They should exploit them, not try to be something they're not. "You had better hold on to what you've got." --Joe Tex NO ONE HAS EVER accused Ted Turner of lacking confidence. And it was with...
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Protecting the Privacy of Net Surfers
Personalized ads are arousing concerns. The worst-kept secret of online advertising is this: Almost no one clicks on ad banners. And that's bad news for a Web publication's bottom line. At least one online newspaper is taking steps to turn that...
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States Moving to Block Sale of Records
Reporters' information-gathering abilities may be threatened. Governors in Florida, South Carolina and Colorado said in late January they were shocked to discover that digitized versions of driver's license photos had been sold to a New Hampshire...
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The Death of the Free Obit
More and more newspapers are charging for obituaries. With profit margins so high, do they really have to? NOBODY COULD ACCUSE NATHANIEL BLUMBERG OF BEING reticent. The Treasure State Review, an occasional publication the retired dean of the University...
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The Dilution Solution
The courts provide protection when someone borrows a trademark and uses it in a way that causes confusion. The concept of trademark dilution had its beginnings in the United States in a 1927 Harvard Law Review article. The federal Trademark Dilution...
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The New Washington Merry-Go-Round
A survey of 19 key agencies reveals that newspapers are jettisoning traditional beat coverage. Is the public being served? IN 1995, INTERIOR SECRETARY BRUCE BABBITT WAS TRYING TO LET the world know what dire things would be in store for the national...
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We Could Miss the Big Story of the Era
Always a great challenge for journalism is seeing and reporting the big undulations, often not understood or not visible enough, that eventually turn the course of civilization, turn the world. You look for ripples on the surface that may suggest the...
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Who's Watching What in Washington?
The Project on the State of the American Newspaper recently surveyed newspaper coverage of 19 federal departments and agencies, most of which exert an influence on everyday life. The goal was to see which papers, major bureaus and general-news wire...
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