The American Prospect

A monthly political journal of liberal though. Contains articles that generate debate, further ideas, and set agendas; and provides a forum for working through the controversies and hard choices facing all Americans. Includes regular topics and features.

Articles from No. 33, July-August

Back to Boys' School
The waning years of the twentieth century have not been particularly kind to American boys' schools. While it has become axiomatic in some circles that single-sex schools are good for girls and "at-risk" boys, the traditional boys' school seems to...
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Capital's Gain
The income squeeze on the middle class is the big economic story of this decade, but record-setting stock prices and soaring executive pay remind us that not everyone is experiencing a squeeze. The stock market boom and the executive windfalls, in...
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Cyberpower and Freedom
In politics and the public imagination, computers have gone from symbolizing our vulnerability to embodying our possibilities. In their early days during the 1950s and 1960s, computers seemed destined to increase the power of government and big corporations,...
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Family Feud
In "Family Values: The Sequel," Arlene Skolnick raises two important questions. First, is the trend toward family fragmentation--understood as a steady decline in the proportion of children growing up with their two parents--a harmful one? And second,...
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How She Got a Job
Miriam Rodriguez lived the welfare life, 15 empty years of soaps and snacks and midday walks to nowhere. Every day she chanced the diapers cleaned the apartment. washed the dishes, cleaned the apartment again, and every day she knew tomorrow would...
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How We Lost the Peace Dividend
The United States has a long history of opposing large, standing armies. After every previous war, including Vietnam, we expeditiously dispatched troops, shuttered bases, mothballed or scrapped equipment, and canceled defense contracts. Today, our...
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Lingo Jingo: English Only and the New Nativism
Since Slovakia became an independent state a few years ago, the Slovak majority has been imposing increasingly stringent language restrictions on the ethnic Hungarian minority, whom they suspect of irredentist leanings. Hungarian place-names must...
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Popping Contributions: The New Battle for the FDA
As the 104th Congress stumbled to a close in 1996 defenders of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration breathed a collective sigh of relief. Despite intensive lobbying by the drug and medical device industries, legislation designed to scuttle the FDA...
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Regressive Recovery: California's Curious Comeback
By now it has become a truism that the California economy, which fell further than the rest of the nation in the recession of the early 1990s, and took longer to recover, has come back vigorously and is now outpacing the national economy. That's true...
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The Chile Con: Privatizing Social Security in South America
Advocates of privatizing Social Security point to the success of Chile. In 1981, Chile replaced its inefficient state-run pension program with a private system where workers fund their own retirements through compulsory private savings. The Chilean...
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The Moynihan Enigma
Daniel Patrick Moynihan was in an apocalyptic mood. As a late winter rainstorm lashed the windows of his darkened Senate office, Moynihan read scornfully from a column by the Washington Post's William Raspberry quoting the departing secretary of housing,...
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The Real China Question: The Case for Conditional Free Trade. (China's Acceptance into the World Trade Organization)
Links between Chinese officials and U.S. political campaigns--coupled with renewed concern about human rights abuses by the Chinese government--have put China policy center stage. But while public officials and many commentators here have focused...
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The Sexual Counterrevolution
During the 1984 primary season, Ronald Reagan worried publicly that Americans were having too much sex. Promiscuity, he lamented, had become "acceptable, even stylish." The very word "promiscuity," with its reproachful moral overtones, had been replaced...
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What Russia Teaches Us Now: How Weak States Threaten Freedom
For half a century, the Soviet Union was not only our principal military adversary. It was also our ideological and moral "other." Both left and right in America defended their competing visions of a liberal society in reaction to the Stalinist nightmare....
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