The American Prospect

A monthly political journal of liberal though. Contains articles that generate debate, further ideas, and set agendas; and provides a forum for working through the controversies and hard choices facing all Americans. Includes regular topics and features.

Articles from Vol. 17, No. 4, April

A New Prairie Populism: As Clean Energy Begins to Transform Economies in America's Heartland, It Creates Fertile Ground for a New Progressive Politics
BRIAN SCHWEITZER IS AN AGRICULTURAL SCIENTIST, a gun owner, and a third-generation Montana farmer. He is also a popular Democratic governor of a usually conservative "red" state. Schweitzer likes to joke that he has a rule for himself: If he stays...
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Arguing the World: Bernard-Henri Levy and Anatol Lieven Spar on Iraq, Iran, Bush, the Neoconservatives, the Cold War, Hamas, Napoleon, Robespierre
JUST BEFORE THE HOLIDAYS, BERNARD-HENRI LEVY, FRANCE'S MOST influential intellectual, contacted the Prospect offering to write an essay on the future of neoconservatism. Aware that his views on the matter were not wholly consonant with ours, he also...
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A Win-Win Bargain: American and Third World Farmers Are at Odds over Farm Subsidies. Trade Rules That Promote Energy Crops Could Serve Everyone
AS PRESENTLY STRUCTURED, THE global trading system frequently pits the working poor in the developed and developing worlds against one another. The subsidies that help sustain the livelihoods of American farmers have a direct, adverse effect on the...
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Big Bad John
LET ME BEGIN BY ADMITTING THAT IF FORTUNE decrees that the next president of the United States must be another conservative Republican, I'd certainly rather it be John McCain than George Allen, Tom Tancredo, Newt Gingrich, or most of the other current...
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Bill Bennett Forecasts the New Baseball Season
Bill (Sportin' Life) Bennett here. You know, here at the Book of Virtues Race 'n Sports Book, we don't usually give advice on any game of chance that does not involve a handle. But it's time for a new baseball season, and since baseball's mired in...
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Building Green
Jonathan Rose Companies LLC is one of America's largest green developers of affordable housing and other ventures, with more than one billion dollars worth of projects under management. Prospect co-editor Robert Kuttner spoke with CEO Jonathan Rose....
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Bush's Skunktails
IN CONTRAST TO A PRESIDENT'S COATTAILS THAT sweep his party to congressional victories, skunktails have the reverse effect. Bush's skunktails consist of abuses of power, corruption, and incompetence now so widely recognized that, according to recent...
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Business, as Usual? Ethanol Could Be a Huge Boost to Small Farmers and the Rural Economy. but Unless We Are Vigilant, the Big Winners Could Be the Usual Suspects
WHEN PRESIDENT BUSH SUDDENLY embraced wood chips and biofuels on national television, renewable energy producers received a prime-time injection of hope. Ethanol backers forecast a boon for farmers and the environment. Yet serious questions remain...
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Can Government Go Green? the Opportunity Is There, but Market Forces Alone Won't Realize It
IF THE "MISSION ACCOMPLISHED" photo-op was the defining moment of the Bush administration's foreign policy, the president's recent visit to the National Renewal Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, defined its energy policy. One week after he embraced...
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European Shades of Green: In Addition to Our Trade Imbalance, America Has a Huge Deficit of Smart Environmental Policies. Here's Where More Imports Makes Sense
"OH, AND ONE MORE THING," SAID Sebastian Paauw, organizer of a recent trip I took to the Netherlands, "we're not going to rent you a car, but we'll give you a bike." True to his word, he promptly provided me with a bicycle. And while the cheese,...
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Failures of Politics
WHEN HISTORIANS REVIEW THIS ERA, THEY WILL point to the striking failure of our political system to engage, much less remedy, the most pressing national problems. Consider a few key examples" The most notable economic fact is a 25-year decline in living...
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Follow the Farmers
TWENTY YEARS AGO, ON A FARM OUTSIDE MY HOME-town of Aberdeen, South Dakota, I stood with a few dozen local corn growers in a machine shack, huddled around a still. We were trying to show the farmers that their crops could be turned into what we then...
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Fueling the Future
"The fuel of the future is going to come from fruit like that sumach out by the road, or from apples, weeds, sawdust-almost anything. There is fuel in every bit of vegetable matter that can be fermented. There's enough alcohol in one year's yield of...
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Good Genes Gone Bad: The New Public Health Reflects Our Understanding of How Environmental Contaminants Damage Genes. New Genetic Science Offers New Hope
SCARCELY A WEEK GOES BY WITHOUT COVERAGE OF a new discovery by scientists revealing that yet another disease is linked to one or another gene. The range of health conditions now known to be gene related is astonishing. Some are just what you would...
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Melted Steele
REPUBLICANS HAD THE HIGHEST OF HOPES FOR THE candidate they recruited to seek retiring Democratic Senator Paul Sarbanes" seat: Maryland Lieutenant Governor Michael Steele. But since entering the race in October 2005, Steele has trailed the leading...
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Not Your Father's Detroit: The Motor City Virtually Created the Old Era of Shared Prosperity. Today, the Middle Has Fallen out of the Economy. What Can We Do to Get It Back?
IN THE MID-1950S, THE FORD MOTOR COMPANY DECIDED that its most profitable car needed a new home. Up until then, Ford had been making Lincoln Continentals in Highland Park, the industrial enclave near the center of Detroit, where the company had first...
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The Anti-Joe: Ned Lamont Found Just the Man to Take on Joe Lieberman: Himself
NED LAMONT IS AN UNLIKELY insurgent. The founder of a small cable company that specializes in telecommunications systems for college campuses, Lamont is a wealthy man who speaks with the measured cadence of one who earns his living making deals,...
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The Conscience Clause
WE LIBERALS HAVE A LOT ON OUR CONSCIENCES. Who taught the right wing how to use religion for social causes during the Martin Luther King era? Who showed them that discrimination on the basis of race or sex was not something most Americans see as part...
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The Democracy Lab: Next Fall's Swiftboat-Style Attacks Have Been Debuted in Minnesota
IF THE 2004 PRESIDENTIAL RACE taught Democrats any lesson, it's that all the policy pronouncements in the world, even if delivered by a decorated veteran, are no match for a relentless barrage of early negative ads that poison the well of public opinion...
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The Harder He Blows: It May Sound Strange to Ask" What's Happened to Chris Matthews. but in Recent Months, He's Been Even Worse Than Usual. No. We're Serious
CHRIS MATTHEWS BLOWS HARD. This may sound less like a news flash than a crashing redundancy. And it's true that yelling is nothing new for the omnipresent MSNBC/CNBC barking head, for whom picking up the pace and pumping up the volume almost always...
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The New New Gore: Five Years Ago, Al Gore Was the Much-Mocked Pol Who Blew a Gimme with His Stiff Demeanor and Know-It-All Style. Today? C'mon, Admit It: You like Him Again. Now His Own Man Rather Than the Media's Robotic Creation, He's Emerged a Bold Truth-Teller-And Many Who Wrote Him off Have Noticed
THE MOST IMPORTANT SPEECH OF AL GORE'S post-non-presidency was neither well-covered nor particularly dramatic. He delivered it against a plain blue curtain, and when he finished, the applause rippled but never roared. None in attendance, however, would...
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The Once and Future Carbohydrate Economy
HIGH OIL PRICES, ENERGY SECURITY CONCERNS, AND A GROWING awareness of climate change have put the prospect of a carbohydrate economy back on the public agenda. The successful substitution of living plants for fossilized plants would profoundly and...
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The Right Chemistry: Green Chemistry Offers Industry a Way to Reduce Regulatory and Clean-Up Costs with the Proverbial Ounce of Prevention
WHEN THE 2005 NOBEL PRIZE in chemistry was announced last October in Stockholm, the new laureates--Yves Chauvin of the Institute Francais du Petrole, Robert Grubbs of Caltech, and Richard Schrock of MIT--won recognition for creating "fantastic opportunities...
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Travelin' Blues: Reformers, Don't Go Overboard: Many Congressional Junkets Are Good
THE REPUBLICAN TWO-STEP ON ethics reform has proven an amusing spectacle this season. First come panicked promises of reform from GOP congressional leaders; then come rank-and-file pushback and a hasty public retreat. A typical case presented itself...
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