American Theatre

American Theatre is a magazine containing news, features and opinions on American and international theatre. Published six times a year by the Theatre Communications Group, this periodical was founded in 1984.Subjects for American Theatre include drama and theatre. Nicole Estvanik Taylor is the Managing Editor and Jim O' Quinn is the Editor-in-Chief.

Articles from Vol. 27, No. 9, November

20 Questions
Alex Timbers, the 32-year-old Obie-winning director of the' New York City-based company Les Freres Corbusier, currently Has two musicals on Broadway: Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, a tongue-in-cheek emo-infused take on America's seventh, president,...
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3's Company (and So Is 9)
Composers have historically had horrible life luck--or, more specifically, love luck. Their music may sear souls and touch the ineffable, but when it comes to romance, disaster usually lurks. This fact is not lost on playwright Tommy Smith, whose Sextet...
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A Brain for Narrative, a Boost for Neuroscience
SAN DIEGO: "Playwriting is all about what makes people tick. So is psychology--but I wrote plays before I became a psychologist," says Vanda (who uses one name but has two vocations, as a psychology professor and a prolific dramatist). Her new play,...
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A Havana Travelogue: How Cuban Theatre Artists Are Making an End-Run around the Embargo
1986: I AM GROWING UP IN MIAMI. I'VE NEVER seen a play performed live and am decades away from writing one. But I am beginning to think playwrights must be incredibly important people, judging from the latest scandal to grip my hometown. Dolores Prida's...
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Beyond the Numbers
TCG'S STEADY COMMITMENT TO GATHERING, verifying and analyzing fiscal information from its member theatres--as well as a wider theatrical universe--has created a tremendous body of knowledge and historical information for the benefit and use of theatre...
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Bound in a Prison Cell
SAN FRANCISCO: In Act 2, Scene 2 of Shakespeare's best-known play, Hamlet calls Denmark a "prison." This month, a Bay Area troupe takes the melancholy Dane at his word, setting him in America's most notorious penitentiary--Alcatraz, popularly known...
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Camp, Interrupted: The Unusual Suspects Use Theatre at a Juvenile Detention Facility to Let Kids Be Kids Again
"There are a lot of squares around here. Don't look like my "hood."--Lucky Boy, How Fur Would You Go? [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] THE PLAY HAS 15 SPEAKING ROLES, NEARLY half as many parts as it has playwrights. There are three sets: the lobby of a...
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Can Laughter Set You Free? Myanmar Comedians Live in Fear of the Ruling Junta, but Political Satire Still Somehow Survives
FROM THE MOMENT WE LANDED IN YANGON, the former capital of Myanmar (formerly Burma), and we began to quiz our peers about the state of the theatrical arts, the conversation would inevitably play out thusly: [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Us: "We would...
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Do You Know Where Your Children Are?
In Amanda Dehnert's Peter (a Play), all the fragments of our childhood selves are secreted away in many rooms of the same house. If only we could unlock the doors, we might catch sight of ourselves becoming who we are. For Dehnert, whose production...
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Editor's Note
WHAT'S A MOODILY LIT LOS ANGELES CITYSCAPE DOING ON the cover of American Theatre? Is it there to illustrate some eggheaded critical thesis about "life as art," served up under the overused and dependably unspecific headline "All the World's a Stage"?...
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Firepower for Man
ANDREW HINDERAKER WANTS TO MAKE ONE THING CLEAR ABOUT Kingsville, his play that depicts escalating tensions following a school shooting in a fictional American town. "It's not a play about the Second Amendment," says the 31-year-old playwright. While...
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Israel Hicks: 1943-2010
ISRAEL HICKS WAS an under-appreciated gem. He worked all the time. He directed all over the country at the same time that he headed conservatory programs, training future actors, directors and theatre artists of every stripe. His directing successes...
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Jazz Hands
STORYVILLE IS MYTHICAL--almost like Camelot," says Ken Page. "We know it existed, but is there anyone left to talk about it?" Page is directing a revival at San Diego Repertory Theatre Nov. 13-Dec. 12 of the Ed Bullins/Mildred Kayden musical named...
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Lean and Mean, but True to Mission: U.S. Theatres Staved off Crises with Clever Strategies and Strong Programming
"A CRISIS IS A TERRIBLE THING TO WASTE," pronounced Stanford University economist Paul Romer at a venture-capitalist meeting in 2004--an epigram popularly paraphrased in 2008, in the midst of America's economic downturn, by newly appointed White House...
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Norway Extols a New Ibsen
OSLO AND SKIEN, NORWAY: At a popular hangout close to the National Theatre in Oslo, the Norwegian playwright Jon Fosse is merrily catching up with the Norwegian-American director/translator Sarah Cameron Sunde, while several founders of Epic Theatre...
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On the Road Again: How the National Performance Network Addresses the Needs of Touring Artists
CHALLENGE There are many plights to being a regional theatre artist. First off: You're probably poor. Second: You're likely isolated from fellow artists and collaborators in other parts of the country. Third: Even when you have the chance to tour...
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Sundance on the Move: Philip Himberg's Sundance Theatre Lab Is Angling to Become the American Theatre's Premiere New-Work Development Center. Is It Working?
PHILIP HIMBERG IS MIFFED. He is annoyed about a Facebook comment I posted, more a harmless remark about my overtired disposition than a critique of a play process at the Sundance Institute Theatre Lab. Nevertheless, this posting, Himberg argues, "feels...
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Tampere, Finland
THE WONDERFUL ADVENTURES OF NILS: Nils Holgersson may not be a familiar name to most people in the U.S. But ask most anyone in Europe, especially in one of the Nordic countries, and they'll explain that he's an ill-behaved lad who mended his ways after...
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The Garces Ultimatum: Authenticity and Connection Were Elusive Goals for Michael John Garces. Then He Landed at the Helm of Cornerstone
WHILE GROWING UP IN BOGOTA, COLOMBIA, young Michael John Garces was cast as an apostle in a semi-professional production of Godspell. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Neither he nor his family had been born in Colombia. His Cuban father, Sergio, a now-retired...
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The Glass Menagerie
Preston Lane, DIRECTION: I had always been stumped by the character of Tom in The Glass Menagerie: How do you bring to life the idea that you're watching Tom turn his memories, his pain and guilt, into a work of art? Williams was struggling to create...
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Yosemite Cheer: Merriment Endures in a Lavish Holiday Spectacle Launched in the '20S by Ansel Adams
OUTSIDE THE VAULTED WINDOWS OF THE Ahwahnee Hotel's banqueting hall, the Yosemite Valley snow-is thick, and the surrounding peaks shimmer dully in the freezing dark. Lines of cars with brown, slush-thickened tires wait out the night. A couple of parking...
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