ATQ (The American Transcendental Quarterly)

ATQ (The American transcendental Quarterly) is a magazine specializing in Humanities topics.

Articles from Vol. 15, No. 4, December

Co-Habitation and Co-Optation: Some Intersections between Native American and Euroamerican Legal Systems in the Nineteenth Century
The importance of studying intersections between Native American and Euroamerican legal systems in the nineteenth century cannot be underestimated. While the two legal systems had undoubtedly had contact before that time, it was during the middle and...
Dialogue and Public Discourse in William Apess's Indian Nullification
Though Pequot author William Apess has recently begun to receive heightened critical attention, critics have been slow to examine his longest work, Indian Nullification of the Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Marshpee Tribe; or...
Introduction
The December issue of the American Transcendental Quarterly continues its exploration of the convergence(s) of American Indian and Euroamerican cultures by focusing on specific institutions that secure dominant narratives about postcolonial experiences....
Native Americans, Chinese, and White Progressivists in the Land of Sunshine, 1895-1909
In 1895, Charles Lummis, amateur ethnographer and recent arrival from the East Coast, took over the editorship of a Southern California real estate magazine, Land of Sunshine, and transformed it into a forum for the growing Euroamerican elite. The...
Native American Sovereignty and Old Deb in Charles Brockden Brown's Edgar Huntly
Robert D. Newman describes the Indians in Charles Brockden Brown's 1799 American gothic novel, Edgar Huntly, as "expressionistic symbols rather than characters with any depth" (66). The one exception to this statement is the Delaware or Lenni Lenape...
Refracting the Imperial Gaze onto the Colonizers: Geronimo Poses for the Empire
In the late decades of the nineteenth century and continuing into the early twentieth century, America edged its way into the world as a fecund imperialistic power; it formalized a means by which it could, like other European powers, fetishize modern...