ATQ (The American Transcendental Quarterly)

ATQ (The American transcendental Quarterly) is a magazine specializing in Humanities topics.

Articles from Vol. 17, No. 3, September

Honorable Violence: Youth Culture, Masculinity, and Contested Authority in Liberal Education in the Early Republic
Shortly after the New Year in 1840, in the dining hall of Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania, one student "drew his dirk and stuck [another student] in the leg," prompting a heated struggle between faculty and trustees over the proper form of...
Introduction
This special issue of ATQ explores violence in nineteenth-century America. In wars, gang brawls, frontier skirmishes, election riots, domestic abuse, and the routine of slave labor, violence permeated nineteenth-century social life. Accounts of these...
Now the Enemy Is within Our Borders: The Impact of European Revolutions on American Perceptions of Violence before the Civil War
Richard Hofstadter once wrote that "the United States ... has a history but not a tradition of domestic violence" (3). The reverse is true of revolution: the United States has a tradition of revolution but not its history. Only once, in the War for...
The Crowd in American History
Startled by shattered consensus, by riots spreading like wildfire in urban ghettos, and by middle-class students protesting war and the establishment, Americans were shocked out of an "historical amnesia" and scrambled in the mid-to-late 1960s to rediscover...
The Kentucky Tragedy and the Transformation of Politics in the Early American Republic
The Kentucky Tragedy represents one of the best-known and most complicated episodes in antebellum American history. Inspiring literary works by such authors as Edgar Allan Poe, William Gilmore Simms, Julia Ward Howe, and, later, Robert Penn Warren,...