English Studies in Canada

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 2-3, June-September

"A Whore's Answer to a Whore": The Prostitution of Jack Spicer
Damn it all, Robert Duncan, there is only one bordello. A pillow. But one only whores toward what causes poetry Their voices high Their pricks stiff As they meet us. "Dover Beach" I THE ACADEMIC ASSIMILATION of contemporary poetry and poets,...
Eating in Remembrance of Themselves: Mythic Saints and Martyrs in Two Stories by Julia O'Faolain
Woman ought to be able to find herself among other things, through images of herself already deposited in history and the conditions of production of the work of man, and not on the basis of his work, his genealogy. Luce Irigaray An Ethics of...
Expect Delays: Procrastination and the Graduate Student
MY EXPERIENCE OF GRADUATE SCHOOL BEGAN, in a sense, with an act of procrastination. Back when I was an undergraduate, I simultaneously moonlighted as a professional dishwasher, and, as I attempted to juggle this (what seemed to me) hard labour with...
Getting around to It: Revaluing Procrastination
IN 2007, ESC DEVELOPED THE FORTUNATE HABIT Of sponsoring panels at the annual conference of the Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English, the parent association of this journal. In each case (Stephen Slemon's 2007 roundtable...
Going out of Their Way: Tourism, Authenticity, and Resistance in Contemporary Atlantic-Canadian Literature
TOURISM, OBSERVES NEWFOUNDLAND WRITER Edward Riche in a recent interview, "is a kind of pollution:" "[A] s something that one has to rely upon for economic survival;' he adds, "it is the last act of desperation" ("Equal Opportunity" 212). Riche's critical...
Male Trouble: Sir Launfal and the Trials of Masculinity
THE MAIN TITLE of THIS ESSAY makes two allusions: one to Judith Butler's famous Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity and the other to "female trouble," a term for gynecological problems--that is, for the kind of trouble only women...
Misreading the Literary Evidence in Carol Shields's Mystery Plots
CAROL SHIELDS MAINTAINED A LONG-STANDING INTEREST in the mystery genre, and many of her books echo, reiterate, and revise elements of mystery plots. The book that critics seize on most often in this regard is her clever postmodernist parody of mystery...
Pathologizing Procrastination; or, the Romanticization of Work
IN THE NEW TELEVISION SERIES CASTLE, the protagonist Rick Castle (Nathan Fillion) is a best-selling author of detective novels. While framed as a series of murder mysteries, Castle is very much about writing and textuality, peppered as it is by references...
Reading Miller's "Numinous Cock": Heterosexist Presumption and Queerings of the Censored Text
IN 1988, GORE VIDAL REVIEWED A NEW EDITION of the Durrell-Miller Letters, noting "The dust-jacket ... shows three protagonists sprawled in a shallow wine-dark sea--Lawrence Durrell, Henry Miller, and Henry Miller's numinous cock. Needless to say, it...
Resistance Is Utile
IN THIS, MY FIRST YEAR OF A FULL-TIME JOB, I rarely find myself concerned about the extent to which I might or might not be procrastinating. Instead, I think a whole lot more about how much I might be able to increase my potential productivity to make...
Savouring the Flavours of Delay
IT WAS n PLEASURE To BE INVITED to participate in the recent panel on procrastination at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, particularly because I got to engage in a lively discussion, across disciplines, about my favourite topic....
Speaking Volumes about Auto/biography Studies in Canada
THE TWO VOLUMES, Autobiography in Canada: Critical Directions, edited by Julie Rak, and Tracing the Autobiographical, edited by Marlene Kadar, Linda Warley, Jeanne Perreault, and Susanna Egan, demonstrate the vigour of contemporary auto/biography criticism...
Splenetic Ogres and Heroic Cannibals in Jonathan Swift's A Modest Proposal (1729)
I. Cannibalism: Ethnic Defamation or a Trope of Liberation? In A Modest Proposal for Preventing the Children of Poor People from Being a Burthen to Their Parents and Country, and for Making Them Beneficial to the Public (1729) Swift exploits the...
Terror, Love, and the National Voyeur: Gilbert Parker's the Seats of the Mighty
One of the most popular Canadian novels of the late nineteenth century is one that many non-specialists today may not have even heard of, Gilbert Parker's The Seats of the Mighty (1896). The novel, which is set like many Canadian novels of the time...
"What I Didn't Do on My Summer Vacation"
IT'S ALWAYS THE SAME PATTERN. I produce a proposal for a conference, slamming out the major idea and chief evidence in five to seven hundred words. Before writing the paper--or as a means of putting off writing the paper--I then "prepare": I read,...