The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 12, 2004

Asia Faith Groups Join AIDS Fight ; the 15th International AIDS Conference Kicked off in Bangkok Sunday
As governments across Asia grapple with a rising tide of HIV/ AIDS, attention is turning to the role that faith-based groups can play in combating the virus.Around 100 such groups are attending the 15th International AIDS Conference, which opened here...
Click Here for Instant (Re)play
Walk into San Francisco's SBC Park for a Giants baseball game, and you can bring along a laptop or hand-held computer to follow the action or check your e-mail. This year the ballpark has been wired with Wi-Fi, which allows wireless connection to the...
Driver IDs for Illegals Raise Security Concerns ; States Struggle to Balance Homeland Security with Safety on the Open Road
It was already an incendiary topic: whether to grant illegal immigrants driver's licenses.To critics, it is an implicit welcome to millions of illegal Latin Americans each year. To many supporters, it's a simple matter of safety: helping thousands of...
Harvests of Jewels, Pockets of Treasure
For several growing seasons, the multihued photographs of fields filled with wildflowers drew my gaze when I thumbed through seed catalogs. Rolling meadows dotted with daisies, sprinkled with scarlet poppies, and crowned with golden coreopsis radiated...
How Cooking Outdoors Lost Its Charm
Spring progressed toward summer, our first year as caretakers of a ranch in Whitney Valley, Ore., and the days heated up. We welcomed the fire in our wood-fired cookstove during the cold early mornings. But when we fed it wood too long after sunup, and...
How Lay Will Play to a Hometown Jury ; the Former Enron CEO Hopes His Charisma and Charity Will Outshine His Shadow of Alleged Corruption in Houston
Before Enron collapsed in 2001, Ken Lay was one of the best- known and best-liked figures in Houston. People lined up at charity events to have their photo taken with him. They asked for autographs in local restaurants and pointed him out at ball games.Today,...
How to Swim with the Tide When Interest Rates Rise ; Rising Interest Rates Threaten to Savage the Investor Unprepared to Navigate a New Economic Era
For mutual funds, the second quarter was a case of resilience or lurking danger - exactly the kind of contrary sentiments one might expect at the beginning of a sea change in the investing environment.Those in the resilience camp point out that funds...
Iraqi Rebels Dividing, Losing Support ; Fallujah Is Now Emerging as a Symbol of the Splintering Iraqi Resistance. the Mutilation of Six Shiites Widens the Divide
In April, with anger swelling at the US occupation and a Marine- led assault on the Sunni city of Fallujah,thousands of Shiites provided assistance to their Iraqi brothers in the city.Adnan Feisal Muthar filled up his truck with food and drove it to...
Israelis, Palestinians Plot Next Moves on Barrier Issue ; the International Court of Justice Ruled Friday That the Wall Violates International Law
Where Palestinians see victory achieved, Israelis see violence overlooked.The decision by the UN's top legal body to declare illegal the wall Israel is building throughout the West Bank is still reverberating. Palestinians are feeling vindicated and...
Lawsuit Tests Religious Speech in Class ; A Professor Spoke of His Religious Views in Class and Says the College Then Took Action against Him. Does a Teacher Have the Right to Share Such Beliefs in Class?
In a lawsuit that's shining a spotlight on the role of religion in higher education, an Ohio community college philosophy professor says administrators punished him because he made a point of disclosing his Catholic beliefs in the classroom.While the...
Letters
Cuban policies, not US, at fault for Cuban woesIn her July 6 opinion piece, "Bush aims weapons of malnutrition at Cuba," Sara Stephens, director of the Freedom to Travel Campaign, describes the latest measures introduced by the Bush administration to...
Mormons' Sacred Text Goes Public
For a year now, members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- day Saints have been staring at the cover of Jon Krakauer's "Under the Banner of Heaven." The blockbuster bestseller - in both hardcover and paperback - tells the grisly tale of two Mormon...
New on the Endangered Species List: The Bookworm
First, there's e-mail to check. Then instant messages to send and a conference call before you go. Your older son has soccer practice, but he needs new cleats on the way. The twins are coming home from dance camp and you promised they could watch a DVD...
Politics of Spy Agency Failures ; Senate Report on Faulty Intelligence Spreads from Congress to the Campaign Trail
The Washington debate over the justifications for the US invasion of Iraq is deepening in intensity, swirling into a Force 5 storm as the presidential political season begins in earnest.A series of reports critical of the intelligence community's pre-...
Reporters on the Job
* Killed in Russia: Last Friday's murder of Paul Khlebnikov, the American editor of Forbes Magazine's Russian edition, has shocked and shaken the community of foreign journalists (this page). "It's not unusual for Russian journalists to be killed. There...
Retooled Europe May Fuel Investing
If you're wondering whether new investing opportunities still grow in old Europe, consider this: In March, Germany's largest electronics company, Siemens, threatened to relocate 2,000 jobs to Hungary to reduce labor costs. After long negotiations, however,...
Running on Bush Time
One advantage an incumbent president enjoys in an election year is being in a far stronger position than his competitor to control the timing of news.At the beginning of last week, John Kerry was briefly able to best that advantage. Coming off of a largely...
Shades of '90S Instability Return to Russia ; the Yukos Trial Resumes Monday in Moscow amid Woes Fueled by a Journalist's Assassination and a Run on Banks
Russia's image of order and stability, cited as President Vladimir Putin's key accomplishment, faltered last week as bailiffs began dismembering the once-profitable oil giant Yukos and panicked depositors staged a run on several of the country's top...
Slam the Door on Fear ; Originally Published in the Christian Science Sentinel
A headline in the business section of "The New York Times" read, "Calm Down. That Wolf at the Door Has Been Here Before" (May 23).The writer implied that fear is the wolf at the door in today's economy - fear of rising interest rates, fluctuating oil...
The Modest, Impassioned 'Anti-Barbie' ; Elizabeth Edwards - Known for a Good Mind and Good Sense - Takes Her Political Skills to a Larger Stage
Dressed in basic beige, with wash-and-wear hair and toddlers in tow, Elizabeth Edwards could be the average suburban mom - except that she's not.Some analysts suspect she may be sharper than anyone on the presidential ticket. As a law student at the...
Tilting at Political Windmills on a Bicycle Built for Two
Paul Van Dam and his wife, Mary Dawn Bailey, looked a bit, well, unlikely as they rode in matching T-shirts across southern Utah. You couldn't miss their bike, a tandem festooned with a big sign and an American flag. They traveled slowly enough to be...
To Hold onto Gains, Tame the Tax Tiger
One silver lining from the stock market's three-year slump was taxes. Because investors made few if any profits, their portfolios offered Uncle Sam the slimmest pickings in years.Now, with the market's recovery, the tax monster is making a comeback....
Up, Up, and Away
Americans are flying again. More travelers are passing through Denver International, for instance, than at any time since before Sept. 11, 2001, when terrorist attacks sent the airline industry into a budget-busting tailspin.Overall, the total number...
US Distances Self from Vigilante ; Arrest in Afghanistan of a Former Green Beret Follows Other Reports of Mistreatment of Afghans by US Forces
For the past few weeks, US embassy officials had become so worried about the activities of a former US Green Beret in Kabul that they took the unusual step of issuing a press release saying that Jonathan Keith Idema was not connected in any way with...
Why Not Put Schools to the Test?
Since early in America's history as a nation, education has been integral to our nation - a way of overcoming class and caste distinctions that, in other countries, prevent people from realizing their dreams and hopes through their intellect and energies....