The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 16, 1990

Aquino's Fragile Government Faces Tests over Bases, Elections as Negotiations over Two Strategic US Bases Loom, the Embattled Philippine President Seeks to Revive the `People Power' Movement That Won Her Office Series: Points of the Compass
PHILIPPINES President Corazon Aquino was again toying with trouble.Last week, tensions between the armed forces and the government were high after a controversial July drug bust. Three military men suspected of drug dealing had been killed by drug enforcement...
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Bill Murray Finds Directing First Film a Slow-Motion Act
BILL MURRAY has done many things in television and the movies - romanced Gilda Radner on "Saturday Night Live," found deliverance on a mountaintop, and battled Christmas ghosts and ectoplasmic slime - but until his current movie, "Quick Change," he had...
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Canadian Mine Causes Stir in Alaska Proposal to Strip Mountaintop Threatens to Disrupt a Way of Life and Unspoiled Wilderness. WHAT COST MINING? Series: Windows on America
AS Joe Hotch readies his little wooden red-and-white boat for the opening of the salmon runs one rainy Sunday morning, he wonders about the future of the inlet that provides his livelihood, and the rivers and streams that course through of his ancestral...
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Choice, the Bar, and a Prelate Who Listens
THE decision by the American Bar Association last week to back away from abortion rights was disappointing. The ABA, convening in Chicago, rescinded a resolution passed earlier this year in support of the Supreme Court's decision on Roe v. Wade, the...
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Die-Hard Elvis Fans Descend on Memphis This Is Tribute Week, and 50,000 Fans Have Come Here to Remember
`BEING an Elvis fan - it's everybody's individual thing," says Wanda Eads. "It's here, honey," she says, pounding her heart. Decked out in Elvis T-shirt, buttons, and rings, Ms. Eads proudly introduces herself as the vice president of Elvis Fans of Hoosierland,...
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East Germany's Economy Totters Unemployment Soars as East Finds Little Demand for Its Goods since Economic Union with West
SEA GULLS wheel over rows of idle derricks on Rostock Harbor's No. 40 quay, its once bustling cargo wharfs deserted, its deep-water slips abandoned.East Germany's most important Baltic port is nearly at a standstill, locked in the same predicament with...
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Embargo against Iraq Rekindles Debate on US Energy Policy
THE tumult in the Middle East is reviving debate over energy policy in the United States.In California, Gov. George Deukmejian (R) calls for more offshore oil drilling to cut US dependence on Persian Gulf crude.Natural gas, considered by some the Rodney...
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Fast-Train Protest Shifts Track after Early Calls for Inclusion in Modernization Plans, Many Cities Now Demand Protection. FRANCE: ENVIRONMENT
FRANCE'S $35 billion fast-train program is being seriously challenged in the country's southern region of Provence as an ecological disaster and a threat to the region's quality of life.The fierce opposition, from farmers and urban escapees and hundreds...
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Germany Is No Superpower
THE last few weeks were indeed heady for Germany. The West German soccer team won the world cup. Chancellor Helmut Kohl emerged as the dominant European statesman at the London and Houston conferences, and Mikhail Gorbachev acquiesced to a united Germany...
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Gulf Crisis Shifts Terms of Bases Talks Series: Points of the Compass
THE political battle over United States bases in the Philippines is heating up against the background of the Gulf crisis.Negotiations are scheduled for next month on the future of US military facilities here, which are the largest and oldest overseas...
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Gulf Crisis Tests Political Cooperation among EC Members
EVENTS in the Gulf are providing a fresh reminder for the European Community of the limits it faces in responding to such international crises as a world power.The EC is set to begin talks in December on institutional reforms to enhance political integration....
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Gypsy Asylum Seekers Test W. German Welcome
ON West Berlin's high-fashion shopping boulevard, the Kurfurstendamm, a tiny Gypsy boy sitting on the sidewalk pumps his accordion. An elderly German woman drops a coin in his cup.Two blocks away, a barefoot boy-and-girl team, also Gypsies, works the...
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High Default Rate Continues to Dog Student-Loan Effort
FOR America's troubled student-loan program, it is deja vu all over again, as baseball's Yogi Berra once said about a different circumstance. The problem: Too many students are failing to pay back their loans.Who pays when students walk away from the...
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Hopes for Diplomacy
ALL sides in the Gulf crisis face substantial losses if open war breaks out, so even a slight hope of diplomatic solution is worth exploring. But it's not clear, as yet, whether Saddam Hussein's latest moves offer such hope.His plan to withdraw Iraqi...
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Jordan's Hussein Balances Nationalist, US Pressures
AS King Hussein meets with President Bush in a last-ditch mediation effort to avert an all-out confrontation in the Gulf, his tiny country is bracing itself for hard times. Jordan, which has openly opposed the US military presence in the Gulf, faces...
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Korean Sees Asian Lessons for US MANUFACTURING
AMERICA'S free enterprise system actually constrains the international competitiveness of United States technological firms, says the chief executive officer of a leading Korean electronics firm.An absence of US government subsidies and investments for...
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Leningrad's Aim: A Free Enterprise Citadel City Leaders Plan to Become a Free Zone for Foreign Firms and Local Entrepreneurs
IN marbled halls redolent with the pungent odor of mink, Soviet auctioneers sell the fabled furs of Russia to the highest foreign bidder.For almost 60 years, the annual fur auction in Leningrad's Palace of Fur has been an isolated island of capitalism...
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Make Up with Iran Rafsanjani Wants Closer Ties with Both the US and His Neighbors
THE surprise Iraqi invasion of Kuwait should make the Bush administration belatedly realize that it has been ignoring the other major political and military power in the Persian Gulf region: Iran.Saddam Hussein, perhaps as a result of the American "tilt"...
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News Currents
UNITED STATES AND CANADA</P><P> President Bush lashed out at Democrats on Aug. 14 for failing to come up with concrete proposals to reduce the growing federal budget deficit and said the lack of an agreement threatens US economic vitality....
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On Nature and Humanity Literary Sampler by Primo Levi, a Modern-Day Renaissance Man
THE SIXTH DAY AND OTHER TALES, By Primo Levi. Translated by Raymond Rosenthal New York & London: Summit Books. 222 pp., $18.95</P><P>IT would not be amiss to describe the Italian writer Primo Levi (1919-1987) as a modern-day Renaissance...
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Ontario Turns Plastic Milk Jugs into a Road
RECYCLED milk bottles are being used to reinforce asphalt in Ontario roads. Not all roads, just an experimental stretch.Plastic roads are not a new idea, but using recycled plastic in roads is."The big oil companies already sell a speciality polymer...
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Out of the Mouths of Babes
IF child sexual abuse cases are difficult for trial courts to resolve, the larger issues of constitutional procedures in molestation situations are just as thorny to adjudicate.Only weeks after the United States Supreme Court split 5-to-4 in a pair of...
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Peacekeeping in Liberia
THE elements that crop up to blight much of western, sub-Saharan Africa are all present in the Liberian civil war: poverty, government corruption, indifference to human rights, and wanton killing fueled by tribal animosities. Right now, the United States...
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Pretending to Be the King
DON SIMS visits Graceland about eight times a year "just to be here," he says. Sporting conspicuous, mutton-chop sideburns, Mr. Sims admits to being an Elvis impersonator, performing as the king at nightclubs in the St. Louis area. "It's kinda my way...
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Regional Peace Deal May Slow South African Violence
A nationwide wave of political violence that has claimed almost 100 lives has followed the signing of a peace deal between the African National Congress and Pretoria Aug. 7.The violence, mainly between rival black groups, does not relate directly to...
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Satisfied - of Christ
MOST of us can remember a time when a cold drink of water was what we wanted most of all. Maybe after an all-day hike in the mountains or at the end of a strenuous game of pickup basketball. Water, on these occasions, may seem more precious than gold.Christ...
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Seattle Mayor off to Good Start Rice Faces Problems from School Issues to Gangs and Drugs
THE day after Mayor Norm Rice was elected last November, people stopped their cars in the middle of the street to take pictures of him as he walked around Seattle greeting residents.Today, the surprise and euphoria of having a black mayor in a predominantly...
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Settling Accounts with Stalin
IN 1987 Mikhail Gorbachev - like Khrushchev in the 1950s - spoke openly of the brutal Soviet past under Stalin. But Mr. Gorbachev still had good words to say about the forced collectivization of agriculture in the 1920s - an experiment that led to the...
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The Place Where We Ought to Be
ONE of the most beautiful opening lines of any book is contained in Isak Dineson's "Out of Africa" which begins, "I had a farm in Africa, at the foot to the Ngong Hills." Reading it, you know immediately that this book is going to tell you about the...
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The Third World of California
`CALIFORNIA used to be a bellwether for the rest of the country," says Mervin Field, dean of the state's pollsters. But if it says less about America's future, it still says much about the country's present.California is America's leading third-world...
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Winking at an Italian Classic FILM
AMERICANS don't go to foreign films as they once did. Some distributors and exhibitors still make non-English-language movies available on US screens, but the number of theaters is small and audiences are often meager.There are exceptions, of course,...
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