The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 31, 2004

A Confusing Convention - GOP 'Surrounded by the Enemy'
The CNN Diner is in a prime location in this city. At the corner of 8th Avenue and 34th Street, it sits kitty corner from Madison Square Garden and Penn Station, the Manhattan home of Amtrak, the Long Island Railroad, and an alphabet soup of subway trains....
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Africa Takes Tough Stand on Coups ; the Arrest of Margaret Thatcher's Son Last Week Is the Latest Example of a Crackdown on Overthrows
The cast list of the alleged coup plot in Equatorial Guinea reads as if straight out of a cold-war thriller: An aging mercenary determined to organize his last big job, the corrupt leader of a tiny oil-rich nation, and the playboy son of the former leader...
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Athens Wins a Laurel
By Zeus, Greece did it! With the Olympic flame now snuffed out after burning brightly for two weeks, the 28th Summer Games should be remembered for those amazing Greeks who pulled together at the last minute to finish the sports venue, spiff up their...
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At the RNC, It's All in the Bag
Who would have thought they would have been such reasonably good guests, these protesters from such groups as the Clandestine Insurgent Rebel Clown Army, and the Spartacus Socialist Youth Club? Even the feared anarchists have yet to wreak any Revolutionary...
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California Controversy: Gold Rush into Casinos ; with Indian Gambling Poised to Expand, State Seeks Its Share of the Winnings
California could soon be lighting at least some of its path out of fiscal darkness with the flashing bulbs of expanding Indian casinos. It's a trend, observers say, that is percolating in other cash-strapped states.Fulfilling a campaign promise to push...
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Darfur Needs More Than Words
The crisis crept up slowly. Must it also be resolved slowly? Ethnic cleansing of African Muslim villagers by the tens of thousands has been going on for more than a year in Sudan. The world's awareness of this slaughter - 30,000 to 50,000 - began last...
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Does the State Have a Right to Monitor?
Babette Hankin of Croyden, Pa., likes to show off her home- schooling program. Not only do her seven children stay occupied all day, but the five of school age seem to thrive in her regimented rotation covering earth science, reading, math, and even...
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GOP to Play Bush's Likability Card ; Speakers Will Tout His Man-of-the-People Style, but Critics Say His Policies Belie the Image
In presidential politics, it's axiomatic that sitting presidents go into their conventions as known commodities. While challengers can introduce themselves to voters, incumbents are already defined in the eyes of the public, and have to defend their...
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Greek Women Lead Olympics to Success
While ancient history was the buzzword of the Olympic Games' return to their birthplace, history was also made in a very modern way: these were the first Olympics with women in the key leadership roles, including the first-ever woman head of a national...
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Harry Potter for Adults ; Two Scholars Try to Help England Defeat Napoleon with Magic - and Almost Destroy Themselves
The prospect of having to read an 800-page novel billed as "Harry Potter for adults" was enough to make this weary book critic pine for an invisibility cloak. But for those of you who, like me, can't endure another charmless opening at the Dursleys',...
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I Love My School 'Family' - except When I Don't
When a colleague exclaims in exasperation "These families!" she refers not to the parents or siblings of our students but rather to an innovation put in place by my school district.With more than 5,000 students, Elizabeth High School is one of the largest...
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Immigrants' Children Ace Sciences
Enrico Fermi, Albert Einstein, John von Neumann, Niels Bohr: The legacy of foreign-born scientists and mathematicians in America is well known.They helped create the computer and the atom bomb, and have contributed a good portion of America's Nobel Prizes....
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Knock, Knock: It's Houston's New Truancy Gambit ; A City with One of the Nation's Highest Dropout Rates Sends Volunteers Door-to-Door
Juan Garcia knows how close he came to being a high-school dropout.Growing up in public housing, running with a gang, and pulling down poor grades, he had all but given up on his future.Now, he's a director at a local college, working on his PhD - and...
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Laura Bush: From Reserved to a Rising Star ; the Erstwhile Campaign Wallflower Has Become a Campaign Player
When she first moved into the White House, she was called the "anti-Hillary." She had long ago given up her own career to support her husband and raise her children. She had married George W. Bush on the condition that she never have to deliver a political...
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Letters
Allies understand the need for troop reassignmentIn his Aug. 24 Opinion piece "US troop withdrawals costly to alliances," Ambassador Robert Hunter is correct in saying that "the impetus for change [to our global defense posture] is obvious." But his...
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Melting Snow with My Fingertips ; for Kids
Amy was excited. Her family had moved to a new house, and she was going to a new school. On the first day of class, the teacher introduced her to the other third-graders, and one of them took her for a tour of the school so she wouldn't get lost. It...
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No Longer an Action Hero, but a Potent Force
He was supposed to be the new American political idol, an outside- the-broken-system reformer crying "Hasta la vista, baby" to politics as usual.Riding the voter anger of California's zany 2003 recall election, Arnold Schwarzenegger had just the right...
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Palestinians Take Back the Night in Ramallah ; with New Upscale Restaurants, Bars, and Theater, the West Bank City Is Undergoing a Cultural Revival
Just a few minutes drive from Yasser Arafat's half-destroyed headquarters, Usama Khalaf's version of upscale Ramallah dining is taking off.His restaurant called Darna occupies a grand renovated stone villa with high-ceilinged archways and a second-floor...
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Philosophy: Hot Major at Two-Year College ; Passionate Professors in New Jersey Turn Its School's Philosophy Department into Success Story
As summer slowly melts into fall, students here at Bergen Community College are registering for classes. School won't begin for another two weeks. But on the third floor of the serpentine structure that houses most of the college, George Cronk, head...
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Protesters, Most Peaceful, Stream through Manhattan
Drums resonated rhythmically through the streets, people danced to the beat of anti-Bush chants, and a giant inflatable pig floated by, an inscription on its flank reading "Piggy Piggy GOP." It was all part of the World Says No to the Bush Agenda march...
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Redefining 'Black'
From my physical features and peanut-butter color, people are comfortable categorizing me as black. That label does not begin to define what produced me, and so I have decided to redefine what America cannot.I'm black, but I'm also more than black.My...
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Reporters on the Job
* Book Clubs for Men: For correspondent Mark Rice-Oxley, the story about a men-only book club in England (page 1) hits close to home. His wife belongs to an all-women book club. "There's been some discussion of getting the spouses or boyfriends to come,...
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Should the State Make Life-or-Death Medical Decisions? ; the Case of Terri Schiavo, Which the Florida High Court Hears Tuesday, Will Help Establish Procedures in Future Cases
A six-year legal dispute over whether to terminate the life support of a severely brain-damaged Florida woman has placed the state's highest court at the center of a bitter clash between the right to live - and the right die.Ultimately at issue in the...
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Spotted in England: Men Reading ... and Talking about It
They meet in a pub, the first Friday of the month, a slew of books on the table, a convivial spirit in the air, and a couple of hours of banter ahead.Just another of Britain's many thousands of reading groups? Well, yes. But with a slight twist. The...
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Striving to Solve History's Mysteries ; among the Six Million Artifacts Were Items from Lewis and Clark. but Records Were Poor: How Could She Find out Which Ones They Were?
It all started with a fire. In 1899, a section of Moses Kimball's Boston Museum was damaged by flames. His heirs decided to close the museum, by then a collection of half a million objects, and instead stage theatricals.But first they contacted Charles...
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Sudan's Key Ties at the UN
As the United Nations deadline passed Monday for Sudan to disarm Arab militiamen accused of genocide in Darfur, analysts say that Russia, which now holds the presidency of the Security Council, is not likely to lead the UN charge for sanctions against...
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The Man Behind the Al Qaeda Network ; before the World Began Telling Stories about Bin Laden, He Was Creating His Own Myths
When two Russian passenger jets slammed into the ground nearly simultaneously last week, the first word government officials uttered was "terrorism."These days, that word means one thing: Osama bin Laden. He is linked to every terror attack in the past...
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