The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 28, 2006

Abroad, Bush Tests His Persuasive Powers ; His Trip This Week Addresses Sensitive Security Issues in Two Countries - Afghanistan and Iraq
What was sketched into the presidential agenda as a transatlantic foray to address the North Atlantic Alliance's future has instead become one of the more consequential foreign-policy trips of the Bush presidency - and one of the tougher tests of his...
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As Globe Warms, Can States Force the EPA to Act? ; the Agency Argues That Climate Change Requires a Global Solution, Not Federal Regulations. the Supreme Court Weighs in This Week
Arctic sea ice is melting. Glaciers are in retreat. Sea levels are rising. So what is the Environmental Protection Agency doing about it?That's what a group of state officials and environmentalists want to know.Seven years ago, they asked the EPA to...
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Backstory: The Steeplewright Stuff ; Bob Hanscom Has Become Maine's 'Official' Steeple and Cupola Repairman, Resurrecting 50 of the Structures in His Career
Bob Hanscom commutes to the 19th and 18th century for work. The route is usually up a set of narrow, winding stairs; sometimes a ladder. And sometimes he is hoisted by crane, as high as 130 feet in the air, standing in a yellow metal cylinder that he...
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Best Fiction 2006
General fictionLeaving Home, by Anita Brookner (Random House, $23.95) Anita Brookner's psychological acuity and elegant prose style are fully on display in her 23rd novel, the story of a repressed young woman uneasy in her own life. (Reviewed 1/10/06)The...
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Best Nonfiction 2006
In 2006, headlines were grim and the year's best books were not about to let us forget that. Several popular titles focused on Iraq ("State of Denial," "Fiasco," and "The Prince of the Marshes"), while others tackled the aftermath of 9/11("The One Percent...
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France's Vision for NATO ; Now, as in the Past, We Need a Strong, Mutually Supportive, and Adapted Alliance
Peace can never be taken for granted, and the first responsibility of any government is security. That is why France wishes to contribute to a political organization of the world that averts perils.It wishes to help in the exercise of a shared responsibility...
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How Iraq Panel Went from Obscure to High Profile ; the Iraq Study Group's Rise Was Aided by a Rare Loosening of Official Washington's Hold of the Reins
Rep. Frank Wolf (R) of Virginia has traveled to the most difficult war and civil war zones on the planet - from Chechnya and Bosnia to Sudan and Algeria. He had visited Iraq twice before, both times without a military escort. On his third visit, in September...
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In Lebanon, a Crisis for Christians ; Pierre Gemayel's Murder Is Yet Another Blow to the Christian Bloc, Sidelined by a Sunni-Shiite Political Divide
As this mountain town in the Christian heartland north of Beirut mourns the murder of one of its most revered leaders, Pierre Gemayel, its residents ponder a future that many fear is slipping toward civil conflict."The Shiites want everything now and...
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Iraq Panel's Real Agenda: Damage Control ; the Iraq Study Group's Makeup Gives Away Its True Purpose
Even as Washington waits with bated breath for the Iraq Study Group (ISG) to release its findings, the rest of us should see this gambit for what it is: an attempt to deflect attention from the larger questions raised by America's failure in Iraq and...
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Iraq's Deepening Religious Fissures ; after the Largest Death Toll from a Single Attack since Hussein's Fall, Sectarian Bloodletting Seems Likely to Escalate
Ask residents of Baghdad's Sadr City slum about the probable aftermath of more than 200 killed last week - the largest toll from a single attack since Saddam Hussein's fall - and they speak in apocalyptic terms.These Shiites fear that the burgeoning...
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Political Acrimony Taxes Bangladesh's Economy
Before he arrived in this capital city, farmhand Khadem Ali had never heard of the Bangladeshi Constitution. And yet political wrangling over this document is now driving his wife and children, and millions of Bangladesh's poor, to starvation and despair.Mr....
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Pope's Fence-Mending Trip ; Pope Benedict XVI Arrives in Turkey Tuesday. He Faces a Cool Reception as He Tries to Improve Christian-Muslim Ties
It most likely isn't the welcome Pope Benedict XVI was expecting when his trip to Turkey was first planned. The pontiff's arrival Tuesday has been met not with open arms, but by angry demonstrators, an exodus of elected officials leaving the country...
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States Give Failing Grade to Graduation Rates ; Rising Tuition, Poor Preparation, and Not Enough Degree-Focused Help Are Responsible for the Disappointing Figures, Experts Say
For decades, college gates have opened wider and wider to the American public, with more whites and minorities attending than ever before. But that expansion is under strain in the face of rising costs and faster growth of minority populations long left...
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The Magic of the Movies ; the Purpose of Special Effects Is to Create Illusions That Are Believable, No Matter How Fantastic
"How about a little fire, Scarecrow?" The Wicked Witch of the West taunts a terrified Scarecrow with her flaming straw broom in "The Wizard of Oz" (1939) - and then sets him on fire. But how could she? Wouldn't the actor get hurt? Not likely. This scene,...
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The Power of One Small Idea ; A Christian Science Perspective on Daily Life
I'm one who wants to find the entire solution right away.When a problem looms, I want to categorize it, figure it out, determine a strategy, and fix it. Sometimes this makes sense; other times, I can only accomplish this by sheer force of will. The results...
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Thinking Tiny While Playing It Safe
Nanotechnology, the science of the incredibly small, already has sneaked into hundreds of products from stain-resistant pants to tough golf clubs. That's only a hint of what's possible. But not unless questions about safety are addressed - and soon.Last...
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