The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 10, 2007

Airport Security Lines: Detour Ahead
The E-Z Pass of the air could be coming soon to an airport near you.The registered traveler program, conceived after 9/11 as a way to speed frequent fliers through airports' long and unpredictable security lines, is finally gaining national momentum.Though...
A Land Squeeze in America's Chinatowns
The empty lots, the tangle of highways above and below ground, and the power plant may not look like much. But everyone agrees it's prime real estate.Residents of Chinatown next door see the 20 acres - called the "Chinatown Gateway" on zoning maps -...
America Becomes a More 'Adult-Centered' Nation
Kids just aren't as big a part of American life as they used to be.Americans' child-free years are expanding as empty-nest seniors live longer and more young adults delay - or skip - childbearing. In 1960, nearly half of all households had children under...
A Salve amid Darfur Woes: Better Midwives
Under the blazing noontime sun in this relief camp, Fatima Abdullah Abou does something she couldn't have done before the Darfur conflict began. She takes her patient, a young mother about to give birth, to get medical help at a local clinic manned by...
As Recovery Lags in Gulf, Spirits Sag, Too
When he peered out of his FEMA trailer at the frame of a new house in his front yard, Tony Dixon didn't see, as others might, a symbol of progress on the battered Mississippi coast. Instead, Mr. Dixon claims, the frame became a taunt - a daily reminder...
Book Bits
Got what it takes? By Bill BoggsSo how do you get to the top of your field? In Got What it Takes?, the ueberfamous share what they've learned.Real estate mogul Donald Trump says he's come to expect problems "as part of the deal" and doesn't fight them....
Crime in the World of 'New England White'
After a numbing evening entertaining wealthy alums, Julia Carlyle heads home with her university president husband to a feverish daughter and a runaway cat - only to hit a sheet of ice and wind up in a ditch. If that weren't bad enough, they aren't the...
Global Terror's India Connection
When President George Bush visited this country of 150 million Muslims last year, he introduced his wife to the prime minister with a fact surely intended to amaze: "Not one Indian Muslim has joined Al Qaeda," he said.At a time when Muslim nations from...
Half a Century Spent as 'The Prince of Darkness'
For many Americans under the age of 40, (and particularly those without a weakness for cable-TV news), the name Bob Novak might have seemed quite obscure before the summer of 2003.That was before the veteran syndicated columnist burst back to the forefront...
In Changing Times, Many Chinese Find Wisdom in Confucius
Come back, Confucius, all is forgiven.For nearly a century the ancient sage was confined to the intellectual doghouse in the land of his birth.Today he is fast supplanting communism as Chinese rulers, businessmen, and ordinary citizens turn back 2-1/2...
Letters to the Editor
Speed up response to the risks of global warmingAfter reading your July 5 article, "Could this be the global- warming generation?," I believe that raising awareness of global warming is vitally important, but too many people who accept its reality theoretically...
Millions of Children Left Behind as Eastern Europe Develops
It's 10 o'clock in the morning and Shkelten Daljani, a rambunctious boy of 14 in a tattered "Route 66" T-shirt, should be in school. But if he wants to eat, he has to help his father collect scrap metal to sell. The previous day, he says, there was no...
Remixing the African Image
It seems wrong to try to describe Simon Njami. Wrong, at least, to suggest that the superficial details mean anything.This is a man, after all, who has spent a career fighting the implications behind labels such as "African" - a writer and art curator...
Reporters on the Job
* No Ice Cream Now: Correspondent Sam Dagher was in the town of Khalis in Iraq's Diyala Province exactly one year ago. At the time, he was embedded with a US military unit. "I strolled through its bustling market with US soldiers. I chatted to vendors...
Seven Literary Couples Form 'Uncommon Arrangements'
Why are we always so fascinated by other people's marriages?"We flip through magazine articles about celebrity breakups at the dentist's office, or carefully deconstruct the tension between a couple at a dinner party," notes author and cultural commentator...
She's in Charge of the Tigers' Turf
You know that feeling you get the moment you step foot in a major league baseball stadium, when the whole field comes into view?No matter how many games you've been to, that immaculate green of the outfield grass, the reddish-tan of the infield dirt,...
'The Pentagon': The Shape of Power
While World War II raged in Europe in early 1941, the United States military high command occupied 17 separate buildings in Washington, D.C. With US intervention looking more certain every day, Brehon Somervell decided that consolidating military headquarters...
The Right - and Wrong - Way to Give Advice
Americans are swimming in advice. Countless experts tell us what to eat, how to date, and what to do when interest rates rise. Success is just a seminar or self-help book away!Is it any wonder, then, that so many of us try to be life coaches for our...
US Faced with Iraqi Army Turncoats
As the US military continues to move through Diyala Province to uproot Al Qaeda fighters hidden amid its villages, an emerging foe may be helping to erode many of the successes the Americans are having in the three-week-old operation "Arrowhead Ripper."According...
What If Moses Had Had Google?
Eric Schmidt, CEO of the Internet search engine Google, speaks for a company that's not only conquering the world of data, but figuring out ways to expand it. When asked about Google's future, he talks about the targeted personalization of search results:...
When 'Made in China' Is a Warning
The theory goes like this: Engage China and, willy-nilly, it will reform. The world has opened its doors to "Made in China" goods, but with so many recalls of Chinese products from toys to tires, Beijing is hardly acting like an accountable regime.In...