The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 10, 2006

Ad War at Full Blast as Alito Hearings Begin ; Interest Groups Target Specific States and Take to the Internet to Make Their Case for or against Confirmation
Supreme Court nominee Samuel Alito faces his first questions from senators on the Judiciary Committee Tuesday, slightly ahead of where he was when President Bush nominated him on Oct. 31.In contrast to previous judicial nominees, Judge Alito's approval...
A Famed Curator's Take on Some of the Giants of 20th-Century Art ; Katharine Kuh Offers Her Keen Perspective on an Era
A small number of women played a dominant role in the emergence and acceptance of modern art in America. Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, with the indispensible assistance of Juliana Force, established the Whitney Museum. Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, Lillie...
Backstory: Getting Lost in 'FOUND' Magazine ; Lyrical Litter: For Some, a 'Diary of the Human Race' Exists in Found Scraps
Rebecca Hughes has locked away her bike and started walking more. And seeing more. When she leaves her home for her desk job in a government building, Ms. Hughes turns off her thoughts (they'll be there later) and lets the street overwhelm her: political...
Choice in Cable Channels? Debate Heats Up. ; Minorities and Christians Raise Concerns That Individual Channel Pricing Will End Their Programs
With everyone from consumer groups and minority organizations watching closely, Congress is poised to decide whether to enter a roiling debate over cable and satellite bills.At issue is whether paying for TV channels should be like shopping at the supermarket,...
Climate Summit Challenges Kyoto's Approach ; Six Nations, Responsible for 40 Percent of Global Greenhouse Gases, Meet Wednesday
The inaugural two-day summit of what many see as an American-led alternative to the Kyoto climate treaty convenes Wednesday in Sydney.Formed this past July, the new bloc brings together the US, China, India, Australia, South Korea, and Japan. These six...
Hearts That Break Silently ; Anita Brookner Offers Us Another Polite but Profoundly Solitary Heroine
It was Henry David Thoreau who so famously opined that most men lead lives of quiet desperation. But there has perhaps never been a novelist more skilled than Anita Brookner at producing detailed portraits of what an exquisite female version of that...
Iraq's 'PBS' Accused of Sectarian Slant ; Shiite Control of State-Funded TV Has Critics Worried about the Independence of Iraq's Fledgling Free Press
In the press office of Iraq's Kurdish President Jalal Talibani, a half-dozen staffers monitor CNN, Saudi-financed Al Arabiya, and the local news channel Al Iraqiya, which is state funded, but independent - in theory.Nearly 50 percent of Iraqis tune into...
Jury Duty Is for Everyman - and Some Presidents
Some states allow doctors, firefighters, and teachers to get out of jury duty because their jobs are too critical to go vacant for any length of time, but what if you're the leader of the free world?Turns out, there is no exemption for that occupation...
Letters
A letter from the comptroller general of the United StatesI am writing concerning the Jan. 5 article entitled, "The comptroller: Washington's prophet of fiscal doom." While I was accurately quoted by Linda Feldmann, I have two serious concerns about...
Love Lost and Found ; A Christian Science Perspective on Daily Life
I'm home from a wonderful visit with a relative - the best I've ever had. But to say this visit was wonderful is to bear witness, in some small way, to the fact that even apparently irreconcilable differences can be healed.For over three decades, I'd...
New Rumbling over Salvage Logging ; Debate Revives over Managing Burned Forests, as a Report on '02 'Biscuit' Fire Casts Doubt on Benefits of Salvage Work
After wildfire sweeps through timber, as it does every summer across the American West, the inclination of foresters is to salvage the scorched trees. Turning them into paper and lumber, the reasoning goes, is better than letting them decay. It removes...
No Clamor for Xbox in Japan ; Microsoft's Failure to Gauge Cultural Tastes in Pushing Its American Superstar Product Has Resulted in Weak Sales
At Osaka's Bic Camera, one of the city's largest electronics superstores, the games department is buzzing with shoppers. But while US stores this holiday season were teeming with gamers clamoring for Microsoft's new Xbox 360, consumers here were ignoring...
Reporter Abducted in Iraq
Jill Carroll, a freelance journalist currently on assignment for The Christian Science Monitor, was abducted by unknown gunmen in Baghdad Saturday morning. Her Iraqi interpreter was killed during the kidnapping."I saw a group of people coming as if they...
Some of the Big Ideas Behind Modern Art ; Why Did They Create? Tracing the Thematic Threads of 20th-Century American Art
At last. A user-friendly "big-picture" art history for lay people who want to understand what modern American art means and how it reflects the zeitgeist of the 20th century. Well, not all that it means, of course. At 208 picture-laden pages, Imagining...
Taiwan Leader Pushes US Arms Deal ; President Chen This Week Renewed a Request to Approve a Multibillion- Dollar Arms Purchase
In a bid to rally Taiwan's flagging independence forces, President Chen Shui-bian's New Year's resolution seems to be provoking mainland China with a push announced this week to buy US arms, including eight submarines and a dozen sub-hunting aircraft.For...
The Black Storms That Swept America's Plains ; before Katrina: The Tale of the Depression-Era Dust Bowl
As he reached back more than 70 years to chronicle America's epic dust storms, Timothy Egan couldn't have known his book would be released on the heels of hurricane Katrina. The weather patterns of today's Gulf Coast are completely different from those...
The Guest Who Throws a Family into Crisis ; A Mysterious Young Woman Wreaks Havoc on the Lives of the Unsuspecting Smarts
Ben Franklin once quipped that visitors, like fish, stink after three days. He'd obviously never met Amber, the barefoot 30- something at the center of Ali Smith's novel The Accidental.Amber turns up one day at the home where the Smarts are enduring...
The Tangled Web of Lobbyists and the Majority Party
Money scandals are nothing new to this city. The long sordid story of cash and politics may currently be focused on lobbyist Jack Abramoff, but it traces back through former Speaker Jim Wright's book deal and Abscam to the presidency of Ulysses S. Grant...
Time Is Ripe to Reform Lobbying
Last November, the world's largest and most foul-smelling flower attracted thousands of visitors to the US Botanic Garden, which lies at the foot of Capitol Hill. It took 14 years for the titan arum to fully reveal its unique, nose-pinching display -...
Why Budget Fixes Can't Wait ; Rising Longevity, Healthcare Costs, and Federal Obligations Will Force a Reckoning in the US, Experts Say
After another year of failed reform, America's preferred plan to pay for Social Security and Medicare seems clear: Wait and see if we can muddle through.President Bush's all-out White House effort to sell Social Security reform fizzled. The program that...
Young Poets, Winning Words
What a joy it is to announce the winners of our 10th annual Young Poets Contest. We received more than 1,000 entries from students in the United States and from many countries around the world. We were impressed with the high quality. Congratulations...