The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 23, 2008

African Park Bridges the 'Last Mile' of Digital Divide
Jose Nhamitambo's commute starts in the small village called Vinho. He leaves his bamboo and thatch hut, takes a dugout canoe across the coffee-colored Pungue River, and follows a dirt road that cuts through thick, green wilderness. A half mile later...
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Amsterdam Art, off the Beaten Path
Like fans at a rock concert, a friend and I recently stood elbow- to-elbow with throngs of fellow art lovers at the Rijksmuseum, trying to catch glimpses of masterpieces by those 17th-century superstars, Rembrandt and Vermeer. Extensive renovations,...
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A 'Thoroughly Modern' Middle East
It's hard to imagine a less intrepid explorer than Agnes Shanklin, Ohio schoolteacher. The middle-aged spinster (who says she looks like a cross-eyed young Eleanor Roosevelt) has never been outside her home state. And yet, Agnes tells readers of Dreamers...
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A Worthy Obama-McCain Clash
At last. The largely character-driven race for the White House has a full-throated policy dispute, this one between John McCain and Barack Obama: Should a president talk to terrorists or terror- backing states? Americans may be scratching their heads,...
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Border Schools Get Tough on Mexican Students
If you cross the US-Mexican border at the town of Calexico you might run into a photographer named Daniel Santillan. But he's not likely to be shooting pictures of tourists. He only has eyes for Mexican schoolchildren who want an American education.Mr....
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Consumer Confidence
In many parts of the world, it's a challenging time to be a consumer. Prices are up and economic optimism is down. The Reuters/ University of Michigan survey results released last week show that consumer confidence is at a 28-year low in the United States.Difficult...
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Cricket's New Wicket: American High Schools
Not long after Saiful Islam moved from Bangladesh to Brooklyn in 2005, his father - a formidable man of some 70 years - asked Saiful if he'd considered buying a cellphone. Yes, of course, answered the teenager. Besides the fact that most of his friends...
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Critics Slam Loss of Brazil's Environmental Chief
The reactions of the business community and the green lobby to the resignation of Brazil's environment minister last week illustrated just what she meant to Brazil.Business leaders, particularly from agricultural states, celebrated Marina Silva's departure...
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Detainee Treatment: New Details
At the US prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, military guards called their sleep-disruption efforts for detainees the "frequent-flier program." This involved constant cell changes meant to disrupt prisoners' rest and lower their resistance to interrogations.Detainees...
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Going 'Green' Has Willets Point Seeing Red
The pavement surrounding J and L Auto, at the corner of 36th Ave. and Willets Point Blvd., is split open into dozens of fist-sized fractures, exposing the remains of the worn cobblestone underneath. It is a reminder of the storied history of this neighborhood,...
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Letters to the Editor
Nanotechnology bill takes steps to ensure safetyThe May 20 editorial, "Safeguards on nanotech," mischaracterized the legislation (H.R. 5940) approved May 7 by the House Science and Technology Committee.This bill amends certain aspects of the National...
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Petraeus: More Troop Cuts Likely in Iraq
The top commander in Iraq said Thursday he will likely recommend further drawdowns of American troop levels in Iraq before he leaves for his next post.Ending speculation on whether the current drawdown would continue, Gen. David Petraeus told a Senate...
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Rethink the Fight against Cocaine
Every year, White House officials describe the US counterdrug policies in the same glowing terms used to describe the Emperor's new clothes: We're snuffing out coca crops and cracking down on those who grow them. But they leave out two important facts:...
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Singing Their Way to Stardom
Most amateur singers are told to keep their day jobs. Tommy DeCarlo, a Home Depot worker in Charlotte, N.C., is an exception.Mr. DeCarlo, a fan of the band Boston, was so devastated when singer Brad Delp died in 2007 that he recorded several Boston songs...
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Six Months out, Bangladesh's Cyclone Woes Unresolved
The night on which cyclone Sidr engulfed her village, Hawa Begum, seven months pregnant, grabbed her son and ran to a shelter. They survived - but her husband, daughter, and 16 other relatives didn't.Six months after the cyclone killed nearly 4,000 people...
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The Five Words You Need Most
A friend wondered aloud the other day whether, in this age of information overload, responding to someone's e-mail message with a simple "thanks" is a good idea. Maybe in the ping-pong-ping of electronic correspondence, that last ping is unnecessary....
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The London Mews: Trendy Home, Tiny Living Space
I got an e-mail from a friend in the United States the other day who needed my address. "5 Prince Arthur Mews, London ..." I wrote back.Her response was immediate: "I love your address!" she gushed. "It's so ... cute! If you ever collect your essays...
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The Word 'Like' Is, like, Not Pretty
I say "like." Like, a lot.I am a product of my times. I cut my teeth on John Hughes movies and lace gloves. Sometimes I notice it and try to remind myself that any self-respecting, college-educated adult should have some respect for the English language....
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Timeless Grace
Natchez, Miss. - When tourists come to Natchez, most view the elaborately furnished, historic antebellum mansions for which this riverfront town is most famous. But gardeners in the know want more. They ask to visit the exquisite gardens surrounding...
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Tribes Strive to Save Native Tongues
Grass-roots efforts to preserve and teach youngsters native languages are intensifying around the Pacific Northwest and British Columbia as about 40 indigenous tongues are in danger of disappearing within the next decade.Native leaders are compiling...
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Why Qatar Is Emerging as Middle East Peacemaker
This tiny Gulf state emerged this week at the forefront of regional diplomacy, successfully shepherding the negotiations between feuding Lebanese factions to end months of political turmoil and violence.With regional powers, such as Saudi Arabia and...
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With Phoenix Mission, Water Hunt to Resume on Mars
For a decade, the US space program's mantra for Mars has been "follow the water." Now, the Phoenix Mars Lander is poised to reach out and touch it.On Sunday, NASA's latest Mars mission is scheduled to touch down on the red planet, marking a turning point...
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World's Top Envoy Entreats Burma (Myanmar)
United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon flew into Burma's (Myanmar's) disaster zone Thursday, in a visit that could be a tipping point for international attempts to deal with Burma's reclusive military, which has shunned most world leaders since...
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