The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 31, 2005

A Lightning Rod Takes on California Schools ; Schwarzenegger's Choice, Alan Bersin, Is Well-Known for Bluntness, Controversy, and Change
Faced with the difficult task of reviving California's ailing education system, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has turned to perhaps the most controversial reformer in the state - a prosecutor-turned- schools-superintendent whose battles with parents and...
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Any Dog Can Have a Champion Day ; Some Dog Shows Judge Only What a Dog Looks like. but Many Competitions Are All about How a Dog (or Its Owner) Behaves
Sit! Stay! If you can train your dog to obey simple commands, you're ready to explore the world of dog shows. From simply walking dogs around a ring to making them jump through hoops and crawl through tunnels, there are contests for kids with all kinds...
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A Soundscape of People Oppressed - and Moving Up ; Today's Focus on 'Roots Music' Gives New Interest to the Cries, Hollers, Hymns, and Sermons Known to Slaves
Shane White and Graham White have recently written a subtle book, "The Sounds of Slavery, " a history of the oppression experienced by Africans in the United States at Southern plantations in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries - and how they were slowly...
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A Teacher's Son Just Says 'No' to SAT Prep Classes
As a teacher, I have come to think of commercial SAT prep classes as scholastic steroids. And yet, as a parent, I still want my kid to get "juiced."A second wave of college hopefuls just weathered the new 2400- point SAT. I pressed my 17-year-old son...
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A Two-for-One Healing ; for Kids
"Your sister wants to see you." My high school tech teacher pointed toward the classroom door. I met my younger sister, Kathy, in the hall. She was trembling with fear."I just came from P.E.," she said. "Ms. M. saw my leg and said that I have blood poisoning...
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Bloomberg's Pricey Bid to Win a Second Term ; with Formidable Resources, He's the One to Beat for the New York Mayorship, despite Problems with His Image
The District Council 37 union hall was rocking, people literally dancing in the aisles, when Mayor Michael Bloomberg finally arrived at its mayoral forum.The raucous, predominantly Democratic crowd greeted their billionaire Republican leader with a mix...
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'Cedar' Revolutionaries Want More Reform for Lebanon ; in the First Round of Lebanese Elections, Voters Backed the Son of Slain Former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri
Stopping cars hurtling through Beirut's downtown, young protesters do something they could never do before: pass out flyers that urge Lebanese to cast a protest vote against the country's entrenched political class - including the leaders of this spring's...
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Democracy Gains in Ethiopia, a Key US Ally in Terror War ; Initial Results Monday Show Opposition Parties Have Won at Least 174 Seats, Up from 12
In a sign of strengthening democracy in one of Africa's historically repressive countries - and a US ally in the war on terror - opposition parties in Ethiopia have increased their power in parliament to at least 174 seats, from just 12.The nation's...
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Did the Author of '1984' Foretell the Burma of 2005? ; in Orwell's Footsteps a Compassionate Journalist Evokes a Society of Hushed Voices, but Its Complexities Go beyond the Insights of 'Animal Farm'
In the middle of May bombs struck Burma's capital, leaving 19 dead and numerous wounded. The government blamed dissident ethnic groups, then exiled opponents based in Thailand, and finally the CIA. Its adversaries traced the carnage to a government plot...
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European Integration at Crossroad ; the French Voted 'Non' Sunday. on Wednesday, the Dutch May Also Reject the Proposed 25-Nation European Constitution
Already beset by economic doldrums, the European Union's ambitious dream of forging 25 nations into a united global powerhouse on the scale of the US or China has come to a grinding halt - at least for now.By rejecting the proposed European Constitution...
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Forget Crosswords. Britons Now like Their Puzzles with Numbers
Some Britons have been a little distracted of late. Pen in hand, brow furrowed, Hazel Warren has been so engrossed that she forgot to put the dinner on. Others have been late to pick up the kids from school, feed the dog, or start the day.The culprit?...
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In Crowded Schools, Lunch Feels the Pinch
Principal Sue Braithwaite dreads the arrival of 50 new kids at her school next fall. Among other complications, it will mean adding a seventh lunch period."Our school was projected to have 600 students last fall but in actuality we have 700," says Ms....
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Latest Fad in Housing: Buy, Then Rent ; More Investors Are Buying Properties to Rent out, but Not Everyone Is Cashing In
"For rent" signs are increasingly showing up in tony bedroom communities, condos, and exclusive resort areas around the country.They are one more sign of the magnitude of the real-estate boom in the US. Eager to cash in on one of the strongest housing...
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Letters
National healthcare amust-have for today's workersRegarding the May 25 article "Moving healthcare up on US agenda": National healthcare must become a national priority. Employee- sponsored healthcare plus Medicare and Medicaid will never serve the entire...
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No Free Pass for the Icons We Know and Love ; but What Enlivening Conversation a Really Good Book Inspires
Denis Donoghue is a prolific literary critic with some 30 books to his credit, including several on American literature. "The American Classics" is a series of lively interlinked essays centering on masterworks by six major 19th-century American authors:...
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Nuclear Holes to Be Filled
Pessimists of the world, take heart. Most nations came together in May with the goal of fixing the loopholes in a 35-year-old treaty that's worked pretty well to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons.Optimists, take heed. This conference, a twice-a-decade...
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Q&A: Lebanon's Parliamentary Elections
Nicholas Blanford, the Monitor's correspondent in Beirut, answers questions about Lebanon's parliamentary elections, which take place in four regions over the next four consecutive Sundays beginning May 29 with Beirut. On June 5, it's southern Lebanon's...
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Q. Whose Bible Is It? A. Whose Isn't It? ; Today, as in the Long-Ago Past,the Scriptures May Divide but, in a Wider Sense, They Conquer
The news is brimming with religion. People of faith are taking strong stands on both sides of political issues. Jewish settlers are proclaiming a divine right to hold onto land. Evangelicals travel to tsunami-devastated corners of the world offering...
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Reporters on the Job
* A Future Without the EU? Staff writer Peter Ford's adolescent son, Robin, had more than an academic interest in the outcome of the French referendum on the European Constitution on Sunday (page 1).Robin has hopes of becoming a diplomat, and as the...
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Salute to US Troops from Those at Home
To Master Sgt. Ann Weih-Clark there is something different about this war. She was in the military during the first Gulf War, and though she has not deployed to Iraq since the current conflict began, her National Guard office in downtown Baltimore has,...
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Teaching Students to Be 'Competent Jurors' on Evolution
I am a public high school biology teacher, and I do an unusual thing. I teach my students more than they have to know about evolution. I push them to behave like competent jurors - not just to swallow what some authority figure tells them to believe...
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The Boss Who Built MGM's Dream Factory ; 'LB' Left a Harsh Past to Entertain Millions
Louis B. Mayer is one of those larger-than-life Hollywood legends - a la Marilyn Monroe or Jimmy Dean - so familiar we think we know him. Yet surprisingly, unlike the many movie stars he minted during his quarter century at the helm of MGM's star factory...
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The Dangers of Being Uzbekistan's Best Friend
The bloody suppression of an uprising in Uzbekistan dramatizes how Islam Karimov's regime is now more of a liability than an asset to Washington's long-term strategic interests. If we want to avoid a "clash of civilizations" with a billion Muslims, the...
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Today's Yearbooks Raise Eyebrows
Nearly 90 percent of the students at Denver West High School are Latino, so perhaps it should not have been surprising that the cover of the 2005 yearbook boasted a phrase in Spanish: "Quienes somos en verdad?" What was surprising - at least to some...
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US and Iraqis Join to Stem Abuse ; an Effort Is under Way to Promote the Rule of Law among Iraqi Troops Who Deal with Detainees
The argument erupted at a Baghdad tea house between two men and four off-duty Iraqi soldiers. The civilians were detained.But when they arrived at the Iraqi unit's holding pen - part of a US military base in the capital - one bore unmistakable signs...
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When Good Kids Get Bad Advice on College ; Some Guidance Counselors - Arguing for Realism - Set Student Aims Too Low
Kimberly Cummins made headlines last October when she was told by her New York City high school that she could not apply to Harvard University.Confused and indignant, she pressed for an explanation. Boys and Girls High School in Brooklyn, she says she...
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When 'Non' Means So Much More
Just the way a domestic argument over who will empty the dishwasher can expose deep resentment about who does what around the house, so has the debate to ratify the European Constitution turned out to be about something bigger than the document itself.If...
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