The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 9, 2007

A Dish That Keeps on Giving
Ever since taking home economics in junior high school, I have enjoyed baking from scratch. Cakes and cookies are favorites.The texture of my angel food cake, made with a dozen beaten fresh egg whites, is denser - yet smoother - and quite different from...
An Orphanage for Primates
Claudine Andre shields her eyes from the Kinshasa glare, peering toward the thick jungle beyond the perimeter fence and the telltale scraps of banana leaves. "Ou etes-vous?" she calls out. Where are you?From the canopy of trees comes excited screeching....
Blueprint for Greenhouse Gases
Buy a fluorescent bulb and stop a hurricane? It's not that easy. A new climate-change report finds voluntary conservation and the use of clean energies together won't be enough to slow global warming. Rather, strict rules on greenhouse gases will need...
Cheap Power to Northeast US: A Mixed Blessing
A major move to boost grid capacity is under way to bring more cheap coal-fired electricity to the high-cost Northeast. New transmission lines could lower utility bills for millions of consumers and avert blackouts that sometimes hobble the region.At...
Educators, Politicians, and MTV Take Aim at US Dropout 'Epidemic'
With her grandmother correcting her grammar every step of the way, Jynell Harrison made it to high school graduation in 2005. It wasn't easy being surrounded by "a lot of kids that didn't really care about education" and teachers who "get fed up with...
For a Warmer Future, Australia Employs Aboriginal Wisdom
To white Australians, the flocks of red-tailed black cockatoos which flap above tree canopies are a memorable highlight of any weekend hike. But to Aborigines, the parrots are living, squawking barometers."A month ago when the cockatoos were flocking...
Good Night, Moon - and Birds
It may not work as a bedtime children's book the way Margaret Wise Brown's "Goodnight Moon" did for my own son and countless other children. But after watching turkey buzzards settle for the night on a neighbor's property, I'm tempted to pen something...
High Gasoline Prices in US, but Limited Impact
It has become one of those rites of late spring: Gasoline prices soar and Americans threaten gasoline boycotts, while elected officials promise investigations and introduce legislation to crack down on price gouging.Yes, the air is fragrant with plans.The...
It's Not Just about Fired US Attorneys Anymore
Pundits for weeks have been predicting his resignation is imminent, and lawmakers from both parties have called on him to quit. But so far Attorney General Alberto Gonzales has defied critics - and shows no signs of packing his bags.The clamor over the...
Letters to the Editor
An independent Kosovo would not violate the normIn response to the May 7 Opinion piece by Hurst Hannum, "A better plan for Kosovo": Mr. Hannum is wrong when he says that independence for Kosovo will undo the "most cherished principles of international...
On Turkish Streets, Local Battles over Islam's Role
Perched on a high hill overlooking Istanbul's old city, the Pierre Loti cafe is named after a 19th-century French bon vivant whose sensual tales of his time in the Ottoman capital have fueled the imaginations of countless tourists.Earlier this year,...
On Vacation from the War in Iraq
Joey Jacobsen's youngest daughter, Paige, was born during his first deployment in Iraq. She's 3 now, and Army Captain Jacobsen has been away at war for more than half her life. He's missed other important childhood milestones, such as 6-year-old Hailee's...
Pope Visits Waning Latin American Flock
Outside the Sao Bento monastery in Sao Paulo, where Pope Benedict XVI is expected to give a public blessing Wednesday night after arriving in Brazil, florists bustled about creating their arrangements, sparks flew as welders finished a new archway to...
Reporters on the Job
* No Busy Signals Here: Staff writer Sara Miller Llana went to the first church that the pope will visit in Sao Paulo, Brazil, to check out the preplanning mood (see story). "I saw this woman carrying a gorgeous bundle of flowers," she says, "so I...
Tenet of the Iraq War
In George Tenet's new book, "At the Center of the Storm: My Years at the CIA," there is an intriguing phrase that pinpoints the miscalculation that may have done much to trigger the Iraq war.The former CIA director, who served both Presidents Clinton...
The Best Habit
The door of the hall closet was getting progressively harder to open. As the building's timbers dried, the door jammed more until one day I had to put my foot against the wall and grasp the knob with both hands to pull it open.A carpenter came to fix...
The Best Mother's Day Gift: Family Time
This is the week when idealized images of motherhood proliferate. Newspaper ads and TV commercials feature serene, smiling women, sometimes with cherubic children, in Mother's Day pitches for jewelry, handbags, cellphones, and perfume. And on greeting-card...
The Family's Most Unusual Mother's Day
My youngest son, Peter, signed up for cooking class in junior high school when it first opened up to boys and shop classes opened to girls. Never one to be comfortable sitting in a desk for long, he was thrilled with the activity of the class - as well...
The Tony Blair Decade
Last Friday morning, Britain awoke to the devastation of war. The destruction came not in villages leveled and lives destroyed, but in the annihilation of a political party. Though Labour still retains control of Parliament, Tony Blair's party was reduced...
Trolleys Decode EU's 27 Tongues
On a visit to southern Spain last year, Lithuanian Daiva Malinauskiene encountered a typical traveler's problem: no one could give her directions in a language she understood.But rather than pass it off as an inevitable annoyance of travel within the...
Urban Farms Empower Africa
The fields that ended hunger for HenA-riette Lipepele's family are squeezed between a trash-strewn dirt road and a cluster of one- room cinder-block houses.They are not exactly pretty, at least not in the wide, pastoral way that one might imagine fields...
Young Americans and Egyptians Talk, but Don't See Eye to Eye
Over the weekend in Cairo, young Egyptian and American students and professionals came together in a series of meetings intended to bridge differences between the two cultures and countries. They were looking for common ground between Arab and American,...