The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 4, 2005

A Dose of Diversity in Freshman Class Could Alter Congress
One is a former welfare mother. Another fled Cuba at age 15 and ended up in Florida foster homes. A third is the son of a goat herder who excelled at Harvard. Then there's the mother of twin toddlers who says she can find a crayon in her purse more easily...
A Time of Testing for Global Democracy ; Votes This Month Could Mark Advances in the Middle East, but History Shows That Democracy Requires Time, Commitment
The throngs of Ukrainians who braved repression and bitter cold in Kiev's Independence Square were ostensibly rejecting November's fraudulent elections.But they stood for a truth the world is rediscovering as a new wave of democratization laps at resistant...
Bush's Legacy May Hinge on Outcome in Iraq
As George W. Bush is about to enter his second term, some questions come to thought:Q: What kind of grade are historians likely to give him?A: Based on his record thus far, I think that the historians who turn out those ratings - most of them liberals...
Can Africa Solve African Problems?
From conflicts in Sudan, Congo, and Ivory Coast to a boom in Internet use, smooth elections in several countries, and a fresh focus on women and AIDS, the headlines in 2004 gave cause for celebration - and concern. For 2005, one theme stands out: Africa...
Decide Instantly to Read This Review ; the Author of 'The Tipping Point' Returns with a Book about the Science of Leaping to Conclusions
Ever quickly sized up a situation and just known what action to take - or had a startlingly clear first impression of a stranger that later turned out to be preternaturally astute?You may have jacked into what Malcolm Gladwell calls "the giant supercomputer...
'Florida' in Washington State
A voting debacle that can best be described as a "mini Florida" has been playing out in Washington State, where last week Democratic candidate Christine Gregoire was certified as governor elect with a margin of only 129 votes.The state, which mirrors...
For Sri Lanka, a 'Ground Zero' ; Many Mourn at a Train Station Where Hundreds Perished
A small train station along Sri Lanka's southern belly - a sun- drenched, palm-flanked stop called Telwatte - is becoming this country's psychological "ground zero." This is where the Dec. 26 tsunami wiped out a packed nine-car train and took most of...
Interrogating Torture Rules
On Thursday, the public will get a peek inside the Bush administration's long and secretive interagency debate over what constitutes torture of terror-related detainees, and whether torture during interrogations should even be allowed.The occasion is...
In Virtual School, Teacher Is Just an E-Mail Away
Dear Ms. Hart, May I substitute the three-page paper analyzing "The Epic of Gilgamesh" with a different project? Since the story is about friendship, I'd like to film a documentary about a day in my life, and how my best friend's death affected me.The...
Letters
It shouldn't take a tsunami to arouse American interestWhile I agree with your Dec. 30 editorial, "When Global Hearts Open," that the popular response to the Sumatra earthquake and tsunamis has been heartening, I'm discouraged that once again it's taken...
No Easy Access for Remote Islands ; Car Nicobar, with an Indian Military Presence and Indigenous Tribes, Is Kept off Limits to Foreign Aid Workers
On one of the remotest islands in the Indian Ocean, survivors are combing through the wreckage caused by last week's tsunami that obliterated 12 out of Car Nicobar's 15 villages."I can't find anything - not even a piece of furniture," says one man who...
No Hostility, Just Hospitality ; on a Trek across Europe (for College Credit), Students Find That Many Europeans Still like Americans - Even If They Don't like the War in Iraq
Before slipping on his Teva sandals and setting out on a 1,500- mile walk across Europe for college credit last semester, junior Matt Soule took a deep breath and thought to himself, "Should I be worried about being an American in Europe?"After all,...
One Year Later, Robots Still 'Alive' on Red Planet ; Guaranteed to Survive Just 90 Days, the Mars Rovers Are Thriving, Giving Hope to Scientists That More Discovery Lies Ahead
Now might have seemed the perfect time for an epitaph. One year ago this week, the first of NASA's two Martian rovers came to rest on the desolate fields of the Red Planet, the clock already ticking on a life span guaranteed to last only 90 days.But...
Paying for College Just Got Harder
One education publication dubbed it the "December surprise": Two days before Christmas, the Bush administration announced it was revising the formulas for its Pell Grants - the federal government's primary aid vehicle for America's neediest college students...
Quiet Banter between a Mute Man and Tongue-Tied Boy ; the Little Boy Who Drops into Howard's Silent Life Seems like a Horrible Inconvenience - but He Changes Everything
Howard, the narrator of Dave King's debut novel, "The Ha-Ha," has a condition that makes him an unlikely storyteller: He cannot write, read, or speak. After a near-fatal injury in the Vietnam War when he was 18, Howard gradually regained normal intelligence...
Reporters on the Job
* Entrepreneurial Bent: On a recent trip to Uganda, the Monitor's Abraham McLaughlin heard one plea over and over again: We need capital. (Page 7)"In many countries in Africa, the political institutions are established enough that the focus is turning...
Rude Awakening to Missile-Defense Dream
On Christmas Eve 2004, the Russian Strategic Missile Force test fired an advanced SS-27 Topol-M road-mobile intercontinental ballistic Missile (ICBM). This test probably invalidated the entire premise and technology used in the National Missile Defense...
The Civil Rights Movement Must Water Its Spiritual Roots ; the Real Goal Isn't Political Power, but Reconciliation
George W. Bush's presidency has thrust a particular set of moral values and Christian activism to the forefront of public life, stirring questions about which values should be reflected in public policies and how religious groups should participate in...
Time for a Renaissance? ; First Published as an Editorial in the Christian Science Sentinel
Mention the word, and people almost always think of the great period of discovery and enlightenment that took place during the 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries - the Renaissance, or rebirth, when much of Europe emerged from the so-called Dark Ages and...
US Intensifies Its Role in Relief ; Its Aid Is Proving Crucial - and May Lift America's Image
After a much-criticized initial response to the tsunami disaster in southeast Asia, the US is now assuming a more prominent role in the humanitarian relief effort - applying its monetary and military resources in ways that not only are bringing critical...
War on Terror Is Part of a Larger Battle within the Muslim World ; September 11 Was Only Incidentally about Americans
Reading Gilles Kepel's new book, "The War for Muslim Minds," challenges one's sense of scale. Crucial, irreversible steps such as George W. Bush's early decision not to pursue the Palestinian- Israeli peace process and the neoconservatives' justification...
What Do Air Travelers Want? Competition Spurs Innovation. ; the Major Carriers Experiment with More Legroom, Relaxed Fare Rules, and Frequent-Flier Perks to Keep Customers Loyal
If Jane Viscardi Brown had had her druthers over the holidays, she would have hopped on JetBlue - the low-cost airline that prides itself on high-quality customer service.But it doesn't fly from Myrtle Beach, S.C. So she took Delta to San Francisco and...
Where Do All the Snowflakes Go? ; It's Cold, It's Slippery, It's a Whole Lot of Fun. It Makes Winter a Wonderland. but There's Much More to Snow Than Sledding. the Very Water You Drink Depends on It. Here's Why
The land of giant refrigeratorsEvery winter I go skiing on our city's water supply. As I swoosh down the slopes, I marvel at the fact that much of the water we use in the summer - for drinking, bathing, watering the lawn, or washing the car - was put...