The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 27, 2004

A 20th-Century Giant ; New Biography Claims FDR Saved the World, but Where's Eleanor?
Franklin Delano Roosevelt's central role in American history is indisputable. He successfully guided the nation through the Great Depression and World War II and, in doing so, forever changed the role and place of the federal government in American society....
A Harder Look at After-School Help
It's 3:15 p.m. at William Monroe Trotter Elementary School, and instead of heading for the exit through the school's peach-colored and electric blue doors, many students are breaking into small clusters for their after-school tutoring session.Third-grader...
A Stand for Principle, Bumper to Bumper
It was a Sunday afternoon and I was headed with my two children to the science center downtown. The parking lot was packed, but outside on the main road was a perfect spot. I drove my minivan just ahead of it, put my blinker on and began to back in.That's...
Blair Faces His Toughest Week as Prime Minister
Prime Minister Tony Blair faces the most hazardous week of his nearly seven-year tenure, as two of the most controversial issues of his premiership come to a head within 24 hours of each other.On the domestic front, Blair is confronted with an unprecedented...
China's Banner Year Felt Abroad ; Economic Dynamism and Other Recent Successes Are Expanding China's Influence, Particularly in Asia
After a roller coaster year of SARS, new leadership, 9 percent growth, and the first Chinese astronaut in orbit, there is a slightly weary tone in Beijing as the country settles into a much desired Chinese spring holiday kicking off the new "Year of...
Competition: The Fear That Makes Girls Feud?
Why girls fight. It's a topic that many find uncomfortable. But Lyn Mikel Brown refuses to shrug it off. The professor at Maine's Colby College has long been fascinated with how popular culture influences girls. Of particular fascination: what she calls...
Court Announces Review of Death Penalty for Minors ; the Supreme Court Agrees to Take a Missouri Case That Examines Whether a 'National Consensus' Has Emerged
A month after a Virginia jury balked at sentencing convicted Washington area sniper Lee Boyd Malvo to death, the US Supreme Court has taken up a Missouri case to examine the constitutionality of the juvenile death penalty.At issue is whether subjecting...
Egyptian Firm Is Clean, Green, and in the Black
Egypt, or even the Arab world, isn't noted as a hotbed of social capitalism. In fact, the companies most famous for their do-gooder business products - The Body Shop, Ben & Jerry's, Starbucks - are best-known for catering to first-world customers and...
From Iraq to Libya, US Knew Little on Weapons ; Doubts That Hussein Had WMD Raise Questions about War's Rationale and Intelligence Reliability
When it comes to unconventional weapons, Iraq may have been far from the most dangerous country in the world after all. In recent days a string of surprising revelations has scrambled the world's proliferation threat assessments.Iraq's weapons programs...
From Shame to Strength ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Nobody likes to feel humiliated. It's a feeling of being horribly alone, naked in the face of others, mistreated. And sometimes there's the nagging lament that we might have contributed to this feeling ourselves - that we, deep down, may even deserve...
High-Concept Design in a Shelter
On a damp December day, graduate students at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) wrestled their semester's work into final form. Wearing stylish glasses; snug, cropped pants; and boots that hit at mid-calf, they gathered around their projects: a...
'I'm Dreadfully Hankery for Forest' ; Canadian Painter Emily Carr Was Drawn to Native Culture Decades before Her Countrymen Saw Its Value
Canadian painter Emily Carr once said, "Nobody could write my hodge-podge life but me." With self-effacing humor, she claimed that biographers couldn't "be bothered with the little drab nothings that have made up my life."To Susan Vreeland, who's quickly...
In Politics, the Year of the Warm and Fuzzy Ad ; TV Spots Have Been Touting Candidates' Bios, Integrity, and Leadership Skills. but They May Get Edgier as Race Moves On
Despite the subzero temperatures and steady snow as voters go the polls Tuesday in New Hampshire, it's been an unusually warm and gentle campaign season, especially on television.But those temperate politics are not expected to last. New Hampshire's...
Internet Helps Odd College Clubs Recruit
If you sent your child to Georgetown University and he joined the Grilling Club, you might think he's busy interrogating fellow students.But actually he'd be cooking. Yes, the Grilling Club is really about food.They ought to chew the fat, so to speak,...
Letters
Haiti's problems solved by Haitans, not US helpRegarding Randall Robinson's Jan. 23 Opinion piece "Haiti at brink again - US owes help": I was a former foreign service officer at the United States Embassy in Haiti for two years beginning in the summer...
Might of the Termites ; They May Be Pests to You, but on Africa's Grasslands They Improve the Soil, Provide Lookouts for Cheetahs - and Make a Tasty Snack
It's party time on the savanna! Right about now, millions of winged termites are taking to the air. It's the same every year: They fly around for a few minutes, land, pair off, mate, and begin digging a new colony of termites.Termites aren't the only...
Morality Play: How the Panthers Got Their Roar
The last time the Carolina Panthers played the New England Patriots in a game that counted, there were 50,000 empty seats. The Patriots went to the Super Bowl and won; the Panthers ended the season having lost 15 of 16 games. Some fans wore paper bags....
National Book Critics Circle Nominees / Fiction
Race is the predominant theme among the fiction finalists for this year's National Book Critics Circle award. From the thousands of novels and short story collections written in (or translated into) English, the 23-member board winnowed its list of favorite...
New Hampshire Forecast Aside: Some Campaign Givens
Forecasting the outcome of the New Hampshire primary is a fool's game. Polls at this time of year are inherently unreliable. There are too many undecideds, too many last-minute changes of mind. On top of that there is New Hampshire's history of making...
Past Has Cautionary Lessons for Guest-Worker Programs ; in Europe and America, Programs to Legalize Undocumented Workers Have Often Had Negative Impacts on Workers, Nations
As church faithful light altar candles and Spanish-language hymns echo down hard-tile hallways, a group of Mexican elders huddles inside La Placeta Catholic church here. The 10 men are former participants in a guest-worker program that ended in 1964...
Reporters on the Job
* Egyptian Example: Gretchen Peters has crisscrossed the globe, reporting on aid and sustainable development projects in such places as Mexico, Pakistan, and Afghanistan. So she approached today's story about an Egyptian agricultural company that also...
Thai Government Takes Heat for Its Handling of Bird Flu
An outbreak of bird flu that health authorities have connected to at least seven deaths in Vietnam and Thailand is raising questions over how governments in Southeast Asia balance public health concerns with pro-growth economic policies.One year after...
Theory in Chaos ; Viewing Literature through the Lens of Some "Ism" Seemed Revolutionary in the 1960s. Today, Many Are Calling It an Irrelevant Approach
A n old joke used to ask, Where are the last bastions of Marxism? Answer: the Kremlin and the Duke University English department. But now that the Soviet Union has dissolved, the last defenders of Karl Marx's ideas may indeed reside on a pretty, Gothic-style...
This Race's Big Issue: Beating Bush ; Democrats Consider Electability the Deciding Factor, above All Others, Prompting Many to Back Kerry on Primary Eve
If John Kerry emerges triumphant from Tuesday's New Hampshire primary election, it will probably be for one reason: perceived electability.More than any year in memory, political observers say, Democratic voters are intently focused on a single question...
Turkey's Eye on the Prize
If Turkey's prime minister could finally succeed in bringing the fifth-largest Muslim nation into the European Union, what a win that would be for moderates in the Islamic world - and what a defeat for religious extremists who back Al Qaeda.This, then,...