The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 10, 2007

'Alexis De Tocqueville': The First French Critic of the US
The 18th and 19th centuries were a tumultuous time in Europe. France, in particular, was looking to find its feet after its revolution, which had wiped out a considerable part of its nobility.Under these circumstances, it was but natural that scholars...
A New Deal with News Readers
Among the many wonderful attributes of the Web, the one that may have the greatest ability to change the world of the news media is the possibility it creates for easier two-way communication.The Web has made enormous changes to the media landscape....
A Promise for the Earth
One of the biggest ecological disasters ever to occur was the so- called Dust Bowl of the 1930s. Centered over the panhandles of Oklahoma and Texas and extending into surrounding states, the area had been grassland capable of surviving almost any weather...
At Grand Canyon Skywalk, Controversial Twist on Eco-Tourism
Anita Wells shuffles cautiously up to the edge of the glass floor and then stops short. The view before her of the Grand Canyon thousands of feet below causes her to tremble. "Oh, I can't do this," she moans.But Ms. Wells and her sons have arrived at...
Book Bits
Capt. John Bissell was a US Marine who fought in the Vietnam War. His military service ended before his son Tom was even born but Tom nonetheless felt the war - always haunting his father - to be a dark presence throughout his childhood. In 2005, Tom...
Europe's Guest Workers Ask, 'Where Are Our Pensions?'
Enrique Aviles Ruiz is ready to collect his due - from four countries. After laboring as a farmer in his native Spain and as a guest worker in Germany, France, and Belgium, he's now navigating the labyrinth of international bureaucratic and legal systems...
Find That Shape
What do a mountain and a snowflake have in common? Here's a hint: It has to do with geometry. When you think of geometry, you probably think of squares, triangles, and circles. Those smooth-sided figures are called plane geometry shapes. Egyptians used...
From Hiding, Sadr Rallies against the US
"Yes to Moqtada, yes to Iraq, yes to liberation," chanted tens of thousands of demonstrators as they poured into the revered Shiite cities of Kufa and Najaf Monday calling for US troops to leave Iraq.The event - on the fourth anniversary of Baghdad's...
From L.A., a Reinvention of Big Labor
It's no secret that labor unions are struggling with declining membership and loss of negotiating clout, but don't tell that to the hundreds of activists who gathered Friday for a rally outside the Hilton Hotel at Los Angeles International Airport.These...
Graft Shakes South Africa's Vaunted ANC Party
If money is the grease that makes democracies function, then South Africa should be one of the most well-oiled democracies in the world.In the past few months, South African newspapers have reported manifold scandals that reach deep inside the ranks...
In 'Einstein: His Life and Universe,' Energy, Mass, and Enlightenment
A great year could be defined as winning the Masters in your first attempt as a professional (Tiger Woods, 1997), sweeping the Oscars after a storied directing career (Martin Scorsese, 2007), or any number of impressive accomplishments, from winning...
In 'Shakespeare's Kitchen,' How It Feels to Be an Outsider
Reading Lore Segal's fiction is like peeling away intricately patterned wallpaper only to find another layer underneath. Shakespeare's Kitchen seems to me the best book by one of our best writers.Twenty years have passed since the release of "Her First...
Iraq Duty Stretching National Guard
For a National Guard wanting to help support the war in Iraq and Afghanistan yet fulfill its primary mission at home, new deployments may further test its ability to be everywhere at the same time.The Pentagon announced Monday that Guard units totaling...
Latin America Demands More for Its Oil and Gas
Forty miles in from the eastern city of Santa Cruz, down a rough dirt road lined by nothing save a few crude homes and the odd cow, stands a jungle of shiny silver and yellow tubes and tanks.It's the property of the Spanish gas and oil company Repsol...
Letters to the Editor
Posh K Street office not needed to help the poorRegarding the April 2 article, "War on poverty is winnable": The article is right. The war on poverty certainly can be won.Neal Wolman, a social scientist quoted in the column, is wrong when he says that...
Mom and Baby, in Perfect Tune
Convinced that I didn't have a good voice, I hadn't sung in over 20 years: not a church hymn, not an office-party "Happy Birthday," not even a ditty in the shower. Not until about two years ago, anyway. That's when the most receptive, appreciative audience...
Praise the Lord (and Be Sure to Pass the Collection Plate)
American Protestant churches are always asking for money. That hasn't changed for at least two centuries. But listen carefully to the fundraising appeals of yesteryear, and to the shifting rationales given over time, and what emerges is a seldom-heard...
Psst, Don't Forget: The World Is a Magical Place
I was driving down the road, chattering to my toddler son about the view from the windows: "There goes a dump truck! I wonder if we'll see a firetruck? Look at that shiny car." I pulled up at a light and pointed excitedly to a school bus, exclaiming,...
Reporters on the Job
* Uninvited to the Movies: Staff writer Dan Murphy's story is about social and cultural loosening up in Saudi Arabia (see story). But it's not a universal change, and certainly not one that everyone wants publicized.Dan tried to attend a screening...
Russia's Wedge into Europe
The Soviet Union had a hammer and sickle as its emblem. Today, the more appropriate insignia for Russia might be a hammer and wedge - a symbol for divide and dominate. Or so it sometimes appears in its dealings with the West.For example, Moscow has succeeded...
Students Sue Antiplagiarism Website for Rights to Their Homework
In a table-turning episode in the digital copyright wars, four teenagers are suing a business for allegedly trampling on their copyrights. Their product: homework.The saga began last year when McLean High School in Virginia adopted a widely used antiplagiarism...
This 'Secret' Isn't Worth Keeping
Esoteric (that is, inner, hidden) spirituality is going public. The official website of "The Secret" announces "a new era for humankind," kick-started by the sale of millions of copies of the DVD and book version, both of which were released last year....
Wave of Saudi Youths Challenge Kingdom's Conservative Sway
Young men in a cafe here laughed when asked if, in an attempt to get dates, they still discreetly toss phone numbers at girls as they pass their cars or tables."That's so five years ago," says one. "We just get together in the family sections of cafes,"...