The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 5, 2007

As US Foreclosures Mount, States Step In
Soaring foreclosure rates are sending states scrambling. Their goal: to protect homeowners from a new crop of scam artists who claim they will "rescue" borrowers. At the same time, some states are forming funds that could provide affordable fixed-rate...
A Vacation to a Fairy-Tale Place Where 'Dragons' Fly
This little town has a faintly imaginary quality to it. But I can't really elaborate on what that means, not even after 40 years of coming and going. Things seem never to change, yet do all the time, and I am never surprised at what will seize the imagination...
Coping with Water Scarcity
As climate change becomes the No. 1 environmental issue around the world, it presents a new framework for evaluating - and gives greater urgency to - a host of other sensitive environmental issues, such as loss of biodiversity, desertification, natural...
Diamonds in the Ruffians
Avraham Eaton takes three black cases out of his leather satchel and places them gently on Gina Rupiper's desk. He unzips one case, known as a sleeve, plucks out a folded square of oil-free paper, and sets it down in front of Ms. Rupiper. She unfolds...
Faced with a Lack of Energy Options, Thailand Looks to Coal
As the Thai economy continues its steady growth, policymakers are drafting energy strategies with a view toward keeping the lights on for the next 15 years. To do that, planners say, Thailand must nearly double its electricity production to about 55,000...
Firing of US Attorneys Puts New Focus on Voter Fraud
The amounts of money involved seem small, almost trivial. Some of the East St. Louis, Ill., residents were paid only $5 or $10 for their vote. But handing out this old-fashioned walking-around cash still earned Sandra Stith a fine and a year's probation...
Lessons Learned: Iran's Release of British Prisoners
The lessons of 2004 worked again in 2007. The release of 15 British naval personnel Wednesday, coming after several days of intensified negotiations, was welcomed in Britain as evidence that a "softly, softly" approach could prove effective with Iran...
Letters to the Editor
A just society is a sustainably built society Regarding Beth Kowaleski Wallace's March 22 Opinion piece, "Britain's ban on the slave trade: moral lessons for today": The article points out that many Britons, while they took no active role in the slave...
Man the Dikes for Climate Change
What to do? A glacier that provides water to Peru's capital is melting away fast, perhaps gone in 25 years. Should the people of Lima pay to desalinate seawater, bring in water on ships, or simply move? Like the Whos of Dr. Seuss's Whoville, many parts...
On the Horizon
Fewer sharks = fewer scallops Tourists may have been unhappy with "Jaws" roiling the waters, but scallops didn't mind. Researchers have found that, at least off North Carolina, overfishing of the largest sharks has led to the inadvertent collapse of...
Pakistan Looks to Tourism to Fight Terrorism
Pakistan has declared 2007 its year of tourism. And what a year it's been: dozens of bombings, the capture of a Taliban lieutenant, and now the Chief Justice of the country's Supreme Court has been sacked, setting off violent street clashes. While promoting...
Reporters on the Job
* Saved by the Barrier: Correspondent Sam Dagher was rattled, but escaped serious injury Wednesday when a truck bomb exploded near the Iraqi police station in Sadr City, a poor section of Baghdad. "The police station is located on the edge of Sadr City,...
So Just What's in Fido's Food, Anyway?
Wheat gluten? The contaminated ingredient that was traced to the massive pet food recall is prompting a new wave of scrutiny of the industry. The big question pet owners, consumer groups, animal rights activists, legislators, and others want to know...
Subtracting a 'Gifted' Gap in Math Education
When Katherine Gavin taught algebra to seventh-graders with advanced math skills, she found it was almost too late to tap into their potential. Accustomed to math coming easily, they sometimes resented the work. The key, she decided, is to grab kids...
Surviving a Warmer World: Global Forecast Is 'Mostly Dry'
It's a late March morning, and a light breeze tousles the tops of aspens and Ponderosa pines at Elk Cabin, one of the oldest spots in New Mexico for recording the depth of winter snow. Richard Armijo, a measuring stick in hand, is there to gauge this...
Tehran's 'Man of Action' Mayor Keeps His Eye on National Office
The tree-planting ceremony in Tehran's Dialogue Park feels more like an early stop on Iran's presidential campaign trail than a bid by a humble local mayor to turn Iran's largest city green. Some break through the photographers ringing Mayor Mohammed...
The Role of Congress in Checking the Power of the President
Poor President Bush. He was only trying to defeat terrorists and spread democracy, and here he is up to his neck in Democrats and bad news. The Army has shamefully neglected wounded veterans. Many soldiers in Iraq who have not been either killed or wounded...
US Forces 'Tiptoe' into Sadr City
One month after US forces established a joint American-Iraqi security station on the outskirts the sprawling Shiite slum known as Sadr City, a truck loaded with explosives rammed its outer perimeter Wednesday. The blast reduced massive concrete slabs...
'Water Police' Crack Down in an Ever-Drier Australia
- At first glance it looks like a police car - a white vehicle with a black-and-yellow checkerboard stripe running along its flanks. But as the patrol vehicle turns a corner in the leafy district of Paddington, in central Sydney, its true purpose becomes...
When All You Need Is Trust
Every time i've felt I've been up against a wall, I've found out the same lesson: God is there. The threat, whatever it is - financial, physical, mental - just can't stand up in the presence of the all-powerful God who is with us always and whom we can...
White House Expected to Feel the Heat from Supreme Court's Ruling on Global Warming
The US Supreme Court has pushed up the political temperature on climate change. And judging by most reporting and analysis, the White House is likely to feel much of that heat. Across the news media - print, broadcast, and Internet - there was general...