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The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 6, 1991

Airlines' Shortsighted Opposition to Fast Trains
THE United States government has made repeated attempts in recent years to eliminate all subsidies for Amtrak, the nation's passenger railroad. Officials say nobody wants trains, in spite of regular annual increases in Amtrak's ridership.The government...
An Endangered Human Species
AS you hold in your hands a worthwhile product made from trees, ask yourself this: In an age of environmental awareness and concern over the preservation of species, is there a place for people whose livelihoods - and maybe lives - depend on gathering...
Angola's Break with Its Past
ANGOLA'S exit from 16 years of civil war is a breakthrough both for that battered country and for the democratic movement in Africa.But the starting points of democracy differ from country to country.Angola's great advantage is a potentially strong economy....
Argentine Scandals
BESIEGED by accusations of corruption, drug-money laundering, and scandals involving members of his own family, Argentine President Carlos Saul Menem is at an all-time low in popularity and may suffer a severe blow in forthcoming elections.The country's...
A Stock Potpourri: Winners and Losers
AMERICAN'S have a love affair with "winners" and "losers" - perhaps because of their affinity for sports. And popular Wall Street stock indexes, such as the Standard & Poor's 500, seek to identify economic sectors that are winners or losers in terms...
Beyond Shelter
A HOMELESS shelter in the spring. The words and images contrast gratingly. On this particular balmy day outside a Boston shelter, men and women bask in separate courtyards. Whiskey bottles glint in the sun - but aren't allowed inside.There's a muted...
Boston University's Attempt to Rescue A City's Schools Falters Funding Problems Limit Progress in Chelsea Experiment, but Rising Test Scores Give Hope
AS she walks through the clean, quiet hallways of Chelsea High School, principal Elsa Wasserman marvels, "This is a miracle! There are no emergencies, no fights."There were plenty of both eight months ago when Dr. Wasserman was brought in as part of...
Britain's Tories Hit Hard at Polls
A STRONG tide of opposition voting in local government elections has forced Britain's ruling party onto the defensive.Leading political analysts are suggesting that if the results of polling in England and Wales on May 2 were reflected in a general election,...
Church Leaders Try to Break S. Africa Stalemate Rescue Mission Comes as Rise in Township Violence Threatens Civil War
A BROAD spectrum of church leaders has formulated a compromise plan to prevent a breakdown in the relationship between the Pretoria government and the African National Congress.The last-ditch rescue mission, which came as escalating political violence...
Director Pushes Peace Corps to Meet Needs of World, US
PAUL COVERDELL is a slight man with a Georgia voice sandy like his hair. But his handshake befits his firm forward leadership of the Peace Corps.Appointed as director of the corps two years ago, Mr. Coverdell is pushing the volunteer organization to...
Double-Dealing in Lithuania
THE Soviet Bloody Sunday coup d'etat attempt against Lithuania in January did not stop at the barricaded Parliament in Vilnius. That is where it started.In the three months since Soviet Black Berets and paratroops killed 15 and wounded 400 singing civilians...
Historical Friction in a Cape Cod Family
IN a sedate auction room on Cape Cod, a turn-of-the-century oil painting of no great technical merit sells for $18,000. It is a dark rendering of a woman on the deck of an ancient sailing vessel leaning against the rail and staring morosely out into...
Horses, Gorillas, and Honda Civics Take to the Sky Air Cargo Flys Many Exotic Items Besides Shipping Regular Freight. MODERN NOAH'S ARK
THE winning horse in Saturday's Kentucky Derby raced at an average speed of about 37 miles an hour, but many of the horses came to the Churchill Downs track at more than 600 miles per hour - as air freight.For Emery Worldwide, a subsidiary of Consolidated...
Immigrants Face Up to American Family Values New Language, New Jobs - and a New Child-Rearing Environment Series: RAISING CHILDREN. WHO'S IN CHARGE? Part 3 of a 3-Part Series. Second of Two Articles Appearing Today
BERNARDINO JUAREZ remembers well the May morning 11 years ago when his first child, Bernardo, was born. He drove his wife, Estela, to the hospital and helped her check in. Then, following the tradition of men in his native Mexico, he said goodbye and...
Iraqi Shiite Refugees Say West Has Forgotten Them as Last US Troops Leave Iraq, 600,000 More Shiites May Flee to Iran. as Iraq Calls on the United Nations to Ease Economic Sanctions, Shiite Refugees in Iran Accuse the International Community of Refusing to Support Them
ON the flat desert plain that flanks the road from Ahvaz to Khorramshahr, thousands of green tents are crammed with Iraqi Shiite families.These 70,000 refugees fled southern Iraq during the civil war that followed Kuwait's liberation. They call themselves...
Kurds Assess Why Revolt against Saddam Failed Rebels Were Overwhelmed by Need to Fight and Govern at the Same Time
THE Iraqi Kurds' biggest-ever triumph turned with stunning speed into their biggest-ever disaster.Their attempt to topple Iraqi President Saddam Hussein may have failed. But despite the ensuing disaster, their revolt was not crushed. Peshmerga guerrillas...
Love That Fills a Home
I HAVE a friend, a single parent, whose happiest times are on winter evenings after she leaves work. She picks up her children, gives each one a big hug, and takes them home. Once inside, she switches on the lights, stokes up the furnace, and prepares...
Many Nation-States Face Fragmentation in the `New Order'
ALL over the world the cohesion of nation-states is under attack from within. In the Soviet Union, Mikhail Gorbachev seems more harried every day as republic after republic demands autonomy.In Yugoslavia, long an uneasy alliance, Croats, Serbs, and Slovenes...
News Currents
UNITED STATES</P><P> President Bush has decided that Texas A&M University will be the site of his presidential library, White House press secretary Marlin Fitzwater said Friday. Bush's choice gives Texas two presidential libraries,...
New York Unions Show Strength Recent Walkouts Have Boosted Labor's Influence - for Wrong Reasons, Some Complain. A STRIKE A DAY?
THE US labor movement may have been weakened nationally, but in New York City unions are showing signs of new strength.The Big Apple has been buffeted in recent months by a continuing series of threatened, aborted, and actual strikes.* Manhattan building...
`Parent Power' Is on the Rise Families Are Grasping the Reins of Their Own Lives as They Press Demands for Social and Economic Change Series: RAISING CHILDREN. WHO'S IN CHARGE? Part 3 of a 3-Part Series. First of Two Articles Appearing Today
FOR the past 18 months, lunch hour has taken on new meaning for a small band of parents at Genentech Inc., a biotechnology company. Twice a week, instead of heading for the cafeteria, groups of employees gather in a conference room for an unusual meeting...
Strong Acting Doesn't Save `Mortal Thoughts'
MOVIE director Alan Rudolph began his career as an associate of Robert Altman, one of the premiere mavericks of the American film industry. Since then, Mr. Rudolph has bounced between offbeat, personal projects and more conventional work. His filmography...
Tamil Rebels Launch Offensive against Sri Lankan Army Post
ALTHOUGH Tamil Tiger rebels firmly control the strategic northern city of Jaffna, extending their clout throughout the rest of the northeast of Sri Lanka will be tough, Western analysts say.So far, the country's eight-year-old civil war remains a series...
Television's Renaissance Man `Law & Order's' Michael Moriarty Writes Chamber Music, Plays Jazz, and Just Might Dance. PERFORMER INTERVIEW
MICHAEL MORIARTY is a six-foot-two-inch imp - much too tall to be an imp, of course. And if you remember him mostly from his role as the icy SS officer Dorf in the TV mini-series "Holocaust," it might be a credibility stretch to picture this imp at Fat...
The Endearing Way of Simple Lines
SO great is the charm and spontaneity of drawings that many of us prefer them to paintings - we can supply the colors with our own inner eye.For some unfathomable reason, the line of the pencil or pen is in itself usually more beautiful and penetrating...
UN Gears Up for Peace Operation in Western Sahara
YEARS of United Nations diplomacy have culminated in agreement to begin a small but significant peacekeeping operation to settle the future of the Western Sahara.The UN Security Council unanimously approved the start of the operation last Monday.The...
UN Keeps Economic Grip on Iraq amid Appeals for Leniency
THE United Nations Security Council has decided to keep its economic squeeze on Iraq, hoping that if the Baath Party leadership cannot be ousted, it can at least be forced down the path of political reform.Western allies say that how hard they push for...