The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 8, 1991

Army Corps Faces Unlikely Opposition on Wetlands Citizens Debate New Case for Controlling Rivers. Bayou Country Series: POINTS OF THE COMPASS. Part 27 of a Series. Second of Three Articles Appearing Today
STYMIED by the drop-off in support for big ticket water projects in the 1970s and '80s, the Army Corps of Engineers is seeking a new role in environmental protection."If we had these large dams to build again, we would do it differently," says Jimmy...
Bitter Memories over the River Kwai
THROUGHOUT Southeast Asia, a flood of Japanese trade and aid is starting to submerge memories of wartime atrocities. But here, amid sugar cane plantations and jungle-covered hills in western Thailand, memories are big business.Just north of this agricultural...
Checking the Currents of Women's Sports
'YOU can't be a female athlete without addressing questions of femininity, sexuality, fear, power, freedom, and just how good you are compared with men," Mariah Burton Nelson says. She goes on to deal with all these questions - along with male chauvinism,...
Crime and Privacy
SHOULD the media broadcast or print the name of a woman who makes an accusation of rape?When NBC and the New York Times published such a name recently, they aroused great wrath among viewers and readers. Most news organizations did not follow their lead.As...
Cyclone's Aftermath Tests Bangladesh's Democratic Leader
BANGLADESH'S infant democratic government is grappling with the chaos following last week's cyclone, which killed more than 100,000 and left 10 million homeless.In power barely two months, the government of Prime Minister Khaleda Zia is being tested...
East European Shift Accelerates West European Union INTERVIEW
WHEN Soviet domination of East Europe ended, many observers suspected it would retard the push of the European Community (EC) for full monetary and economic union.Not so, says Henning Christopherson, the vice president for economic and financial affairs...
Environmental Activist Feels Vindicated by Parliamentary Calls to Reject Dam
SEVERAL years ago, we said that if we couldn't change the fate of the Danube, we wouldn't be able to change our own fate," says Janos Vargha.Mr. Vargha is the founding member of Hungary's first environmental group, the Danube Circle, and now the president...
For Blacks at Georgetown, Subtle Indignities Affirmative Action Is Raising Tensions between Minorities and Whites at Many US College Campuses. Part 2 of 2. Series: RACIAL TENSIONS ON CAMPUS. Part 2 of a 2-Part Series. Second of Six Articles Appearing Today
SCHUYLA GOODSON walked into a law class one day and noticed that white students had brought civil-procedure charts to help them through the session.None of the minority students had one, including Ms. Goodson, who is black.The charts were freely accessible...
For Cajun Chef, Swamps Nourish Inspiration INTERVIEW Series: POINTS OF THE COMPASS. Part 27 of a Series. Third of Three Articles Appearing Today
CHEF Paul Prudhomme is peeling onions. One hundred pounds of them.In the front of his K-Paul's Louisiana Kitchen, tourist diners line up to eat jambalayas, gumbos, crawfish bisques, corn bread, and red beans and rice. Just in back of the cramped, communal...
In Pursuit of Racial Diversity Affirmative Action Is Raising Tensions between Minorities and Whites at Many US College Campuses. Part 2 of 2. Series: RACIAL TENSIONS ON CAMPUS. Part 2 of a 2-Part Series. First of Six Articles Appearing Today
OF the 50 law students each year who win a coveted position on the Georgetown Law Journal - a ticket to job interviews later at top-drawer law firms - none have been black for as long as anyone can remember.So this spring, the Georgetown Law Journal...
Iran Looks to Europe to Counter US Influence Relations with Britain, France, the Netherlands Said to Be Thawing, but US Ties Still Frozen
IRAN has launched a major diplomatic drive to break its long international isolation.In the aftermath of the Gulf war, the Islamic republic has restored diplomatic ties with Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Jordan, and Tunisia, and has strengthened existing relations...
Iraq: National Integrity for the Few
Regarding the article "Iraqis See Bitter Loss of National Integrity," April 17: No doubt the Sunnis or the minority Baathists, who up to this point have exercised control, see a loss of national integrity. But not the Kurds or the Shiites - they have...
Is a Window Open for Arms Control?
THE spotlight on arms control, dimmed during the Gulf war, is once more shining in both the US-Soviet and Middle East arenas. The Soviet Union has apparently agreed to interpretations of the Conventional Forces in Europe treaty signed last year that...
Living in the Shadow of Levees. Citizens Debate New Case for Controlling Rivers. Bayou Country Series: POINTS OF THE COMPASS. Part 27 of a Series. First of Three Articles Appearing Today
EVIDENCE of man's conquest of nature abounds in southern Louisiana.Sitting in a sidewalk cafe in the French Quarter, visitors can hear the calliope from a restored steamboat - overhead. The Mississippi River flows along elevated levees past rooftops...
News Currents
UNITED STATES</P><P>In Washington, police fired tear gas at rock-throwing youths May 6 in a second night of rioting in the largely Hispanic Mount Pleasant neighborhood. The unrest was sparked by the shooting of a Hispanic man by a police...
Ontario's Budget Draws Criticism Huge Deficit and Tax Hikes in the Budget Worry Businessmen and the Federal Government
ONTARIO'S left-of-center government plans to spend its way out of the recession. Most economists say it can't be done.The province's budget deficit will rise to $9.7 billion (Canadian; US$8.4 billion); welfare payments will rise by 40 percent; gas guzzling...
Outlook Is Cloudy for Weather Forecasting
FOR people who make weather forecasts and the rest of us who use them, there's good news for the '90s.The American Meteorological Society (AMS) sees "major opportunities ... for substantially improving weather forecasting skill and capability across...
Peace and Power
GIVEN mankind's record of conflict, it sometimes seems to take power to establish and maintain peace. But if we depend on physical force to provide the basis for peace, we are consenting to a precarious priority that brings a fragile peace, at best....
Precarious Kurdish Unity
THE abrupt meeting between Kurdish leaders and Saddam Hussein stunned the Kurds and many in the West. The Iraqi news agency quickly circulated a photograph showing Jalal Talabani and Saddam kissing each other on both cheeks. Mr. Talabani is the most...
Quake Lab Tests Building Designs Scientists Use 'Shake Table' at US Earthquake Engineering Center to Study Structural Stress
EVERY week or so, scientists here in Buffalo, N.Y., strap a scale-model building or bridge onto a movable concrete slab and shake it to smithereens.Or try to, anyway.The researchers in this earthquake laboratory at the State University of New York (SUNY)...
Reclaiming the Poetic Word A CONVERSATION WITH BEI DAO
BEI DAO is the pen name of China's foremost dissident poet. He is hailed internationally, in both literary journals and the popular press, as one of China's most extraordinary young talents and as a driving force behind the 1976-79 democracy movement....
Southeast Asians Assess Kaifu Visit as Japan Toys with a Broader Role, Many Worry about Its Possible Return to Militaristic Aims
SOUTHEAST Asians searching for a new regional security equation are uneasy about a bigger political role for Japan.During a 10-day swing through five member states of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) ending May 6, Japanese Prime Minister...
South Korea Moves to Improve Relations with Mainland China in a Bid to Cool Tensions on the Korean Peninsula, South Korea Is Seeking Better Diplomatic Ties with China. in Addition, Seoul Wants China's Help in Joining the UN
IF an Oscar were awarded for diplomatic acting, South Korea might walk away with it.In a feat of purposeful make-believe, South Korea is appearing to have already renewed diplomatic ties with China, the last close ally of North Korea, even though reality...
Syrians Worry Peace Prospects Are Fading Optimism over Baker Diplomacy Falters over What Is Seen as US Reluctance to Press Israel
A SENSE of impending anticlimax is creeping up on Syrian officials.For the past six months, since joining the United States-led coalition against Iraq, Damascus has been expressing its confidence that the resolution of the Gulf crisis offered a real...
Turkey's Meager Harvest of Gulf Promises
TURKEY'S early support of the United States-led coalition against Iraqi aggression was viewed as crucial. President Turgut Ozal's commitments to shut Iraq's oil pipelines through Turkey, to honor the trade embargo, and to allow the coalition full use...
Uneasy Times for Soviet Journalists the Editor of Ogonyok Magazine Voices Doubts over Gorbachev's Handling of a 'Free' Press. TESTING GLASNOST
VOLTAIRE was once asked where he would like to be in death: paradise or hell. He answered that in paradise the climate is better, but in hell, the people are so interesting, the company is so good!"Vitaly Korotich chuckles mischievously as he paraphrases...
US 25th Amendment Works Well in Bush Medical Episode
ONCE again the United States faced the prospect this week of having a president physically unable to perform his duties, although in this case only for minutes or hours. Throughout American history there have been dozens of such instances.Unlike past...