The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 17, 1992

A Better Way to Appoint Justices
WITH rumors abounding that George Bush may have a chance to appoint another justice to the Supreme Court, we must reexamine the process before we are enmeshed in it. As the confirmation proceedings for Clarence Thomas last fall indicated, something is...
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A Unique Race in California for the First Time Here, Both US Senate Seats Are Open - and the Field Is Bursting. GOLDEN STATE FREE-FOR-ALL
IN what will be a marquee event of the 1992 political season, a long and deep-pocketed list of candidates is lining up to run for one of two US Senate seats from California - the first time both have been open the same year in state history.California...
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Book Clubs Abound
`I WAS girding for a really weird evening," Mike Tidwell says of the night he journeyed from his ascetic writer's world across the Potomac to a suburban book discussion group held at a house on a manicured cul-de-sac with a name straight out of a Harlequin...
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Bush Trade: Redwoods for Votes
LOUDLY announcing his concern for workers' welfare, George Bush is pushing steadily forward with efforts to open up the last remaining stands of virgin Pacific forest to logging.In the name of preserving jobs, Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan is preparing...
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Campaign Funding Evaluated
The special section on campaign funding "The Money," March 5, was timely but disappointing in that it failed to address the single biggest cost of any campaign - TV advertising.Cut TV-time costs and you will have gone a long way toward solving the problem....
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Checkmate
THE BCCI banking scandal came to a head last week. No, not the one involving the shadowy, globe-sprawling Bank of Credit and Commerce International; the one involving the Bank of Congressional Carelessness and Incompetence.In voting last week to release...
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Children on a Split Screen
TWO faces of American children are projected by the media, as contradictory as a smile and a scowl. One is disarmingly idealistic, the other grimly realistic.One face, that of the Fantasy Child, shows up everywhere in the make-believe world of network...
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Clinton Promises Seen Lacking Monetary Legs Economists Say Presidential Candidate Fails to Tell How He Would Fund Economic Recovery
AS Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton treks along the country's campaign trail, he promises great economic change to American voters. But economists say his broad-based spending proposals miss an essential component: adequate funding to carry them through.The...
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Cost of College
TUITION and fees continue to rise at most public and private colleges in the United States, while the ability of prospective students and their parents to pay has been shrinking.As the national economy shakes off its doldrums, the need will grow for...
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Cronies Vie for Asian Property Rights
PROPERTIES confiscated from Asians have been the political plums of successive Ugandan governments for 20 years.Former President Idi Amin set an early precedent for cronyism by promoting an illiterate Army sergeant to the rank of colonel and making him...
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Doubts about Army and Rebels Persist in Northern Uganda
`DO not be deceived," an anxious bus passenger says ominously, after passing through an Army checkpoint on the road to Gulu. "All is not as well as it appears."The uniformed National Resistance Army soldiers seem relaxed as they inspect identity cards;...
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Economic Policy That's More Than a Political Quick Fix
THE American economy is in serious trouble. The recession has brought into stark relief many of the problems built up over more than a decade of economic mismanagement. After ignoring the recession for a year, the Bush administration has come forth with...
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Elvis: The Legend, the Stamp
THE US Postal Service's decision to create an Elvis Presley commemorative stamp mixes for the first time icons of popular culture with those of public culture. The postal service, for its part, has pushed the idea in a way that would do The King's infamous...
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From Lao Hills to California Valley
IN 1977, seven-year-old Zang Moua lived with her extended family of 25 in the hills of Laos, sleeping in makeshift huts for days at a time, sustained by wild herbs and vegetables.In 1978, she found herself in a Portland, Ore., classroom, utterly confounded...
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He Was Not the Enemy
I THOUGHT I had forgiven him, but now I wasn't so sure. Through his fraudulent actions, our family had lost a great deal of money. This person, actually a family member himself, had just been released from prison. The next morning, I was going to have...
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How the Boxes of Fort WinnieAmanda Saved the Day
`YOU don't look too happy, Winnie," Mom said. I didn't know if I should tell. She stopped chopping an onion and looked at me."Remember how everybody on the block played baseball together last summer? Girls and boys both?" I asked."Yeah," she answered."Remember...
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Is Clinton Trying to Have It Both Ways on Gulf War?
TO apply Bette Davis's warning to the current political campaign: We better tighten our seat belts because we're in for a bumpy ride - particularly the candidates and, most particularly, Bill Clinton.Mr. Clinton's tribulations in trying to respond to...
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Major's New Budget Gets a Cool Response from Voters
PRIME Minister John Major, bidding for a fourth consecutive term in power for the Conservative Party, has abandoned key elements of the economic policy of Margaret Thatcher, including her commitment to balanced budgets and dislike of tax cuts for the...
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`Mambo Kings' Turns on Heat but Lacks Substance
`THE Mambo Kings" begins flamboyantly, cutting between a frenetic Latin dance number and a melodramatic encounter - three men, one woman, a knife - steeped in love, jealousy, and violence.The episode is so florid and overheated that you expect it to...
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McFerrin Walks Many Musical Paths
THE mark of a fertile imagination is a willingness to venture down new paths. It's a frame of mind that constantly asks, "Why not?"In the pop music industry, it's rare to find an artist who freely jumps back and forth between musical genres, regularly...
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News Currents
EUROPE AND AFRICA</P><P>The German magazine Stern, citing sources in the German intelligence service BND, said that Iran had obtained two nuclear warheads from the former Soviet republic of Kazakhstan.... Pro-reform forces in South Africa...
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On Stage: Life of Irish Playwright and Yiddish Vaudeville
GRANDCHILD OF KINGS Play adapted and directed by Harold Prince, based on autobiographies of Sean O'Casey. Presented by the Irish Repertory Theatre Company at Theater for the New City through March 29.</P><P>`GRANDCHILD of Kings" fills...
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Region Protests Burma Crackdown Public Sympathy for Fleeing Burmese Minorities Forces Asian Leaders to Voice Concern
FEARING Islamic sentiment at home, once-indifferent governments in Southeast Asia are beginning to speak out against Burma's attacks on its Muslim minority.In a departure from past policy, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Singapore voiced worries last week over...
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Savings and Loans Report a Profit Thrift Industry Appears to Have Turned Corner, but New England Savings Banks in Trouble
SPARRING over the savings and loan crisis by candidates in today's presidential primaries in Illinois and Michigan almost obscured the good news from the Office of Thrift Supervision: 1991 was the industry's first profitable year since 1986."We are now...
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Spring Grads Gird for Tough Job Market the Class of '92 Lowers Its Expectations as Fewer Recruiters Come Calling
FACING the bleakest job prospects since the dawn of the baby boom, college seniors are more likely to be pounding the pavement, resumes in hand, than partying at the beach this spring break.And the sacrifice doesn't end there:* Many students - even graduates...
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Street Kids Learn to Hope
LEARNING hasn't been a priority for 13-year-old Pricha Khamyen. Survival has.Tough and jaunty beyond his years, the teenager, nicknamed Tom, has spent a lifetime on Bangkok streets. Longer ago than he can remember, he fled home to escape cramped living...
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Taiwan Hard-Liners Block Move toward Direct Elections
AFTER three days of unprecedented public debate, Taiwan's reform-minded President Lee Teng-hui has failed to resolve the island's thorniest constitutional issue: direct election of the president.On Saturday, the party's Central Committee convened a plenum...
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Teaching Posts Overseas Appeal to Adventure Seekers
AMERICAN grade-school teacher Deborah Robinson has a necklace made from the bullet she found in her apartment wall in Chad, where she teaches at the American International School of N'Djamena. It is a reminder of the conflict between the government,...
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Thais Combat Literacy Erosion
FOR many developing countries, Thailand's official 86 percent literacy rate is the stuff of dreams.But with success have come new dilemmas in sustaining literacy, boosting education levels, and reaching stubborn pockets of the unschooled, Thai educators...
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Ugandan Officials Urge Asian Investors to Return Ousted Business Community Is Seen as Crucial to Economic Recovery
TWENTY years after former President Idi Amin ousted the country's 70,000 Asians, President Yoweri Museveni is inviting them to return in a bid to jump-start the country's failing economy.The streets of Kampala are cracked and crumbling, and half-built,...
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War Intensifies Inside Disputed Province of Nagorno-Karabakh REPORTER'S NOTEBOOK
AS the fighting has intensified, the task of covering the war in Nagorno-Karabakh has become increasingly daunting. The more casualties mount, the more each side suspects Western journalists unless they propagate only the one side's view of right and...
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Western Sahara Dispute Delays UN Peace Plan Cease-Fire Holds but Sides Disagree on Terms of Independence Vote
WHEN it comes to United Nations peacemaking, just keeping warring armies disengaged is usually challenge enough. When it also involves the unprecedented task of organizing a referendum in a remote swath of desert, the job takes on an entirely new dimension.That...
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