The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 1, 1995

Adjusting the Federal Balance Series: THE STATES AND THE UNION
THE American system of federalism is much studied abroad, but sometimes little understood at home.The Founding Fathers wanted to steer a middle course between what they saw as the tyranny of a king and centralized parliament, and the chaos of the United...
Challenging Work Raises Tough Questions on Race
THE END OF RACISM: PRINCIPLES FOR A MULTIRACIAL SOCIETYBy Dinesh D'SouzaThe Free Press(Simon & Schuster)724 pp., $30THE contention of African-American scholar Cornel West that "race matters" seems never more true than today. In recent weeks, Americans...
Chechnya Is World's Concern President of Breakaway Republic Calls for UN Observers, Further Talks
IN his recent address to the UN General Assembly, Pope John Paul II challenged the countries of the world to create a new universal moral code called the "Charter of Nations." Its purpose: to promote peace and human rights in a world plagued by ethnic...
Chronology of Events in Quebec's History
Nationalist sentiments in Quebec are rooted in the 1759 defeat of French forces by the English in what is now Quebec City. That defeat, and France's abandonment of what was then called New France, is still referred to as "The Conquest." Today, many Quebeckers...
Digital Radio Portends Clarity and Uncertainty
You could say radio's future is already here. Digital audio broadcast (DAB) produces the kind of clarity that audiophiles once only dreamed of. Broadcast by satellite, DAB does away with static interference and costly transmitters and repeaters. While...
Farmers' Beef over Milk Supports but Consumers May Pay Less to Quench Thirst If Federal Dairy Subsidies Are Reduced
FROM Wisconsin to Vermont, America's dairy farmers are facing the biggest industry shake-up since the days when Depression-era horse-drawn wagons delivered fresh milk door to door.Under the controversial "Freedom to Farm" bill passed by House Republicans...
Grateful Eastern Canada Keeps Its Link to West, Clout for French Series: THE QUEBEC QUANDRY
THE relief was palpable in New Brunswick after neighboring Quebeckers turned down a sovereignty bid by a razor-thin margin."The agony of the referendum experience is over," New Brunswick Premier Frank McKenna told reporters early yesterday morning after...
Head of Australia's Unions Shatters the Glass Ceiling
JENNIE GEORGE, president-elect of Australia's trade union movement, is about to become the most prominent woman in Australian public life. She remembers well her first meeting as a member of the executive board of the Australian Council of Trade Unions...
In Pittsburgh, a Revolution Begins in a Shack Radio Pioneers Moved Up to a Tent; Trains and Moths Were Trials
KDKA is generally recognized as the world's first real radio station. Here in Pittsburgh 75 years ago, it pioneered the idea of regular daily broadcasts at predictable times. It was the first station to get an experimental license from the federal government....
Looking for Solutions to Racial Tension in America
Racial Healing: Confronting the fear Between Blacks & WhitesBy Harlon L. DaltonDoubleday,246 pp., $22.50Harlon Dalton knows that the issue of race in America is a two-sided condition, or more accurately, a basically antisocial condition with a top and...
Manuscripts Fetch High Prices on Auction Block
We learned it in school: E=MC2, Albert Einstein's Theory of Relativity.Now, an original working manuscript of that theory will go on the auction block at Sotheby's in New York Dec.11.The 72-page document is expected to fetch between $4 million and $6...
Ohio Peace Talks to Sketch Anew Bosnia's Map and Constitution
IN its most complex diplomatic effort to date, the Clinton administration begins hosting Balkan leaders today in an effort to settle the 43-month Bosnian war, the bloodiest in Europe since 1945.Over an initial estimated two- to fourweek period, three...
O-O-O-Oh Canada
MUCH of the world has a vision of Canada. And it isn't one of "separate solitudes" or ethnic bitterness. Canada, to outsiders, is the epitome of the good neighbor, the civilized society, most steadfast of UN peacekeepers, dual-tongued like some giant...
Quebec's Close Call on Separation May Bring Concessions by Canada Separatists' Slim Loss Boosts Demands for a 'Distinct Society' Series: THE QUEBEC QUANDRY
STEPHANIE FORTIER was in tears. Her youthful dreams of an independent Quebec were shattered. John Urge, who came to Montreal as a Yugoslav refugee in 1956, was crying softly, too. But his were tears of joy. His country - Canada - had been saved.Those...
Shortwave Tunes in to a Changed World
The voices that emerge from shortwave radio's crackling and squealing, the voices that take time and concentration to precisely tune in, the voices that helped tumble the Soviet empire are beginning to fade.For decades shortwave has beamed information...
Southern Schools Are Whistling Dixie as South Grabs More of National Spotlight, Universities throughout the Region Are Teaching More of Their Own Culture
IN a sprawling brick mansion at the University of Mississippi, Oxford, William Ferris points to items in his corner office that indicate the world's growing fascination with the American South.Lined up on the edge of his desk are a book by a German scholar...
Sweden's Liberation Goes Only So Far Women Here Say This Socially Progressive Country Still Has Some Changing to Do
Five years ago Cecilia Omo was just another optimistic student preparing to graduate from dental school and begin a career in one of Stockholm's many state-run clinics.Today, Omo and her partner, now in private practice, run a booming business and make...
Talk Radio's Voice Booms across America 75 Years after the First Radio Broadcast, Its Newfound Influence Is Felt in Washington
'YOU don't like it? Turn it off!" bellows Edward Koch, a politician turned radio talk-show host, about his new profession.Outrageous, irreverent, obnoxious, and sometimes even enlightening, national talk radio emerged from the dark of the night in the...
The No Vote Gives Canada's Markets a Boost
BOTH the Canadian dollar and Canadian bonds were much stronger Oct. 31 with news of the narrow victory of the federalist forces in the Quebec referendum on independence. But hanging over markets and the Canadian economy is a threat of further constitutional...
To Live What One Longs For
It is late, and I am lying in bed in a small stone hut nestled against the Great Rift Wall in northern Tanzania. The hut is part of a rugged camp where my biologist brother-in-law has spent many years doing wildlife research.As I fall in and out of sleep,...
Under God's Good Government Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to World Events and Daily Life
AT one time or another, many of us have felt dissatisfied with the government of our individual countries. Most of us know that just complaining probably isn't going to lead us or our nations to progress. But perhaps fear or the pressure of day-to-day...
Weld's Deal for Those on Dole BAY STATE AS A WELFARE LAB
NEW Jersey has the "family cap." Michigan allows welfare recipients to earn money on the job without immediately docking benefit pay. Iowa helps working welfare moms pay for child care.Each of these states has been a leader in the nationwide effort to...
Winter Pursues Bosnia's Refugees
FEW things are certain in the former Yugoslavia, but the promise of a bitterly cold winter has never been broken. Even if the miracle of a negotiated peace comes soon to the embattled Balkans, the return of cold weather means that the 2.5 million refugees...