The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 10, 1991

A Beauty That Is Plain
The Midwestern landscape is abstract, and our response to the geology of the region might be similar to our response to the contemporary walls of paint in museums. We are forced to live in our eye... . - Michael MartoneONCE, when I was describing...
A Lone Saunterer in the Age of Destinations
LOCAL residents have gotten fed up with offering me lifts on the road to our hilltop bank and post office. They typically drive up the steep road to Landour in third (or is it fourth?) gear, see me plodding along on foot, and out of the goodness of their...
A New Face for Colombian Justice Young Justice Minister Attempts to Reform an Underfunded System in a Drug-Riddled Country
WHEN he took office as Colombia's justice minister more than four months ago, 29-year-old Fernando Carrillo, a black belt in karate with a master's degree in public law and finance, sat down in what many people agree is the hottest seat in the country.Mr....
As the Soviet Monolith Shatters into Pieces the Central Government Grows Less Relevant and the USSR Seat on the United Nations Security Council Could Be Up for Grabs
ON Nov. 19, Eduard A. Shevardnadze was reappointed as "Minister of External Relations of the USSR." Two days later, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin was greeted in Germany by Chancellor Helmut Kohl with the full protocol honors accorded to the head...
As the Soviet Monolith Shatters into Pieces Yeltsin's Russian Federation Feels Nationalistic Tremors
THE Russian Federation harbors within its borders 16 autonomous republics, five autonomous regions, and 10 autonomous districts. If all these autonomies decided to secede, Russia would lose about half its present territory, including regions rich in...
Bush Is Hardly on the Ropes
HAS it been a good year for George Bush? Up close he appears to be in a peck of trouble. But move up to the top of the stadium and look down at the playing field. From there, with a little perspective, it's a different story.It's clear that what was...
Case Spills Light on Ted Kennedy
CHANCES are that by the time Sen. Edward Kennedy comes up for reelection in 1994, his nephew's Palm Beach rape trial will have become a vague memory in the public's mind.But that hasn't dampened the media's enthusiasm for speculation about this episode's...
Chinese Smuggling Rings Resurge despite Tougher Laws, Hong Kong's Police Are Unable to Stop Illegal Cross-Border Trade
SMUGGLING is resurging as a multimillion-dollar business between Hong Kong and mainland China just months after a crackdown temporarily disrupted the lucrative trade.Laden with TV sets and video players bound for China, fleets of bulletproof, armor-plated...
Colombians Elbow in on Bolivian Drug Trade
COLOMBIAN traffickers have set their sights on Bolivia: Dozens of Colombian drug traffickers, some heavily armed, are moving into remote jungle towns in northern Bolivia to take control of the local cocaine business, the United States Drug Enforcement...
Crusader for Democracy Burma's Aung San Suu Kyi Is Kept from Collecting Her Nobel Prize. ANALYSIS
THIS year's winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, presented in Norway today, shares a circumstance with earlier Peace Prize-winner Andre Sakharov and Literature Prize-winner Boris Pasternak: Her own government will not allow her to collect it in person.Far...
Despite Lower Rating, Bush Reelection Chances Said Good
PRESIDENT Bush's public approval rating has deflated by more than 30 percentage points since it peaked in the high 80 percent-range last spring.As a trend, that figure is an ominous sign for his reelection prospects.But how much trouble is the just-forming...
Dinkins' Shelter Plan under Fire HOUSING THE HOMELESS
THE firestorm of protests that met New York Mayor David Dinkins's proposal of a new concept for housing the homeless is still crackling two months later.Neighborhood, elected officials and even homeless advocates have differing objections to the $200...
Employed by Our Father
I RECENTLY attended a meeting of business and professional people on the topic of individual development. One participant gave a talk on the plight of the jobless in our area. She cited statistics showing that our county's unemployment rate is 50 percent...
Free from Corsets, but Still Bound
IN Grandmother's day, underwear was not only something never to be seen, but something never to be talked about, either. "Unmentionables" was the euphemism for all those next-to-the-skin garments that dared not speak their name.How the underwear culture...
Homeless Aid Too Slow, Study Shows
A STUDY of homeless families released last month by Stanford University sociologists shows the public has a number of wrong perceptions about who is homeless and why.The general public thinks of the homeless as mainly substance abusers, mentally ill,...
ICON AND INHERITANCE Exhibitions and Sales of Mexican and Latin American Artists' Work Have Hit an All-Time High. A Huge Show in Los Angeles Covers 30 Centuries, While a Small Boston Show Offers Current Art. MEXICAN ART
SKEPTICS have wondered if the exhibit "Mexico - Splendors of Thirty Centuries" was merely political glad-handing in the guise of a cultural exchange. That's because of the unusual fanfare accompanying this show: visiting international dignitaries, endorsement...
News Currents
MIDDLE EAST</P><P>Armed Jewish settlers rampaged through the curfew-bound West Bank town of Ramallah on the fourth anniversary of the intifada yesterday, protesting against the killing of a settler by Palestinians there. The settlers smashed...
No Place for Hazing
MILITARY trainees, especially those who are volunteers and those who plan to be officers, must expect to undergo mental and physical challenges they might not face in civilian life. But another kind of challenge - hazing - continues to occur, even though...
Reclaiming Christmas Authors Offer Ways to Decommercialize and Enrich the Holiday Season
NOSTALGIC for the joys of a fulfilling Christmas, many Americans lament the growing commercialism of the season. Caught up in a hectic pace, they seek to simplify their celebrations. But how? Magazines offer helpful hints on organization, decorating,...
Shaping Environmental Policy on a Worldwide Scale
IF you have a difficult time getting interested in the earth's global environment, maybe you should try harder. Here are some facts to ponder: * One billion more people will join us here on earth by the year 2000. * About 25 percent of all animals and...
Slow Economic Growth in US Poisons Race Relations
FOR two decades, the United States economy has been marching in slow motion. Since 1973, real labor income per worker (wages, salaries, and benefits adjusted for inflation) has advanced a scant three-tenths of 1 percent annually.By contrast, during the...
Slump Saps Federal, State Revenue
STATE and federal revenue expectations have been shortchanged - again - by the economy's continuing sluggishness."We are weakening our forecast" for federal revenue, says Mark Desautels, an assistant in the office of intergovernmental affairs at the...
Smith Trial Unfolds Pain of Rape Cases
LIKE the Clarence Thomas-Anita Hill imbroglio two months ago, the William Kennedy Smith rape trial has once again focused America's attention on a highly charged sexual issue - this time, acquaintance or date rape.And like the duel in October, when the...
South Africa Communists Prospect Bold New Role
WHILE communism is in disrepute worldwide, the South African Communist Party (SACP) could emerge as a powerful voice for millions of black workers when negotiations for a democratic South Africa get under way later this month.A four-day conference of...
Soviet Breakup Sharpens Doubts over Arms Control Republics Promise Non-Nuclear Status, but Balk at Sending Weapons to Russia
IN a deadpan declaration, apparently devoid of the emotions of the historic moment, the three Slavic republics of Russia, Byelorussia, and the Ukraine wiped away the Soviet Union on Sunday."We ... state that the USSR is ceasing its existence as a subject...
The 'Bleeding Heart' Motif Pervades a Contemporary Exhibit Exhibitions and Sales of Mexican and Latin American Artists' Work Have Hit an All-Time High. A Huge Show in Los Angeles Covers 30 Centuries, While a Small Boston Show Offers Current Art. MEXICAN ART
THE heart is the symbolic battleground of belief, passion, and fear, and is the organizing metaphor for the exhibition "El Corazon Sangrante/The Bleeding Heart," at Boston's Institute of Contemporary Art. The heart is alluded to, even if the 16 artists...
The Poet and Time
EARLY recognized as one of the leading poets of his generation in his native Mexico, Octavio Paz has carried on over the decades an Olympian career as poet, essayist, diplomat, and interpreter of cultures. Born in 1914, he was awarded the Nobel Prize...
The Talks Resume
THE bickering over time and place that preceded this week's resumption of Middle East peace talks in Washington was nothing new. Previous negotiations in 1973 and 1977 had similar preludes. For all the analysis of possible outcomes, these talks represent,...
THE WORLD FROM.The United Nations Where a Sense of Energy Infuses Diplomatic Efforts and the Pace of Resolutions Speeds Up at Year's End
WHEN freed American hostage Terry Anderson first spoke with the press in Damascus, Syria, last week, his thanks included "that wonderful man a tall, dark figure standing behind him.Italian-born Giandomenico Picco, special envoy to United Nations Secretary-General...
Treatment of Juvenile Offenders in California
"Behind the Wall," a recent opinion-page article, gives a distorted description of the California Youth Authority (CYA).The primary mission of the CYA is public protection. To that end, the department believes in a person's ability to grow and change...
Union Is at Hand, but a Somber Mood Prevails in Maastricht EC SUMMIT
IT may be like pulling teeth, but the European Community will resolve enough of its internal differences to approve a new treaty on economic and political integration at its summit here this week.That was the reigning consensus as leaders of the EC's...
Yugoslavs Face Choice: Peacekeepers or War Local Militias and Army Commanders Complicate Bid to Fulfill UN Plan
THE Yugoslav civil war has entered a decisive phase with the end of United Nations mediator Cyrus Vance's latest mission. The main protagonists face the choice of embracing his plan for peacekeeping forces or facing unabated violence."I think they all...