The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 26, 2005

African-American Heritage across the US
A growing awareness of the contributions of African-Americans to US heritage has had a big impact on travel. Suddenly, practically every city and town is telling the world - through brochures, booklets, maps, and websites - about its special African-American...
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Amid Struggles, an Iraqi Family Will Vote ; the Monitor Has Followed the Methboubs since before the War
Sitting in her dark, cramped apartment during another seemingly interminable power failure, Karima Selman Methboub promises to cast aside her family's fears of violence and doubts about the new Iraq to vote in landmark elections on Sunday."We are under...
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A Squirrel Balances a Risk/benefit Ratio
Squirrels and I share apples. First I begin by taking bite after crisp, juicy bite as far as my teeth can reach. Then it is the squirrels' turn. They sit up on their hind legs, in prim postures, munching every morsel. They hold one flexed paw at each...
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Boxer's Rebellion and Democrats' New Tone ; Smarting from Defeat, Senate Minority Leaders Talk about Values and Let Colleague Play 'Bad Cop.'
Still smarting from the loss of their party leader in November's vote, Senate Democrats are setting a deliberately lower and softer profile at the start of the 109th Congress - except for the ones tossing bombs.The leading flamethrower would be Sen....
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Bush's Agenda Faces Rising Budget Deficit ; New Figures Show the Shortfall Reaching $368 Billion in Fiscal 2005, Not Counting War Costs
The outlook for the federal deficit isn't getting any better - and that grim reality could affect prospects for passage of much of President Bush's domestic agenda.Congressional Budget Office projections released Tuesday estimate Washington will run...
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Cheering Iraq's First Steps on a Messy March to Freedom
Elections this weekend in Iraq are the first test of President Bush's new peace offensive.His first term in the presidency was a war offensive, only partly successful, against terrorism. His second term is a peace offensive, a crusade against tyranny...
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Experts on the Oscars ; the Monitor Asked Three Experts on the Academy Awards for Their Reactions to This Year's Nominations. We Also Asked Them Who They Think Will Win the Top Categories
Damien Bona, film historian and author of "Inside Oscar."On the matchup between "The Aviator" and "Million Dollar Baby":"It's an interesting and classic matchup, because 'The Aviator' is a big, sprawling epic and 'Million Dollar Baby' is more of an intimate...
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Iraq Aligns with Its Future
When an established democracy like the United States still has trouble with credible vote counts, it's worth remaining a bit humble in judging this Sunday's election in Iraq. Ongoing violence there - or even more the threat of violence - against those...
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Letters
For US foreign policy, draw on cultural wealth of immigrantsRegarding the Jan. 14 article, "Can State Department rise again?": State and Defense are two sides of a coin. It is said that diplomacy is the continuation of war by other means, or vice versa....
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Municipal Archives Made Entertaining
You probably wouldn't think of a city's municipal archive as an entertaining place to spend an afternoon. (After all, unless you own the land, how interesting can a deed possibly be?) As it turns out though, some civic attics are more interesting than...
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My Predawn Exercise of Body and Imagination
I almost stepped on it, twisting my foot just in time. By the light of the moon, I could barely make out the wriggling tail of a possum as it scampered into the brush. My heart leaped.One of the benefits of running very early in the morning is the soothing...
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Paper-Thin Heirlooms Worth Keeping, and Sharing
Precious possessions take many forms. Some come with hefty price tags and impressive provenances. Others, small and plain, may have no monetary value, but can tug at the heartstrings and stir memories and affections, making them priceless. Think of old...
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Protection vs. Recreation: The Tortoise Tussle ; Environmentalists Win Legal Round to Protect a Reptile, but Off- Roaders Push to Keep Desert Open
As Congress considers whether to tinker with the venerable Endangered Species Act, a dust-up between environmentalists and off- road enthusiasts is spotlighting the power of judges to protect animals from the agencies assigned to defend them.At issue...
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Sifting Intelligence Tips from Vendettas in Afghanistan ; Widespread Tribal Disputes Still Lead to Bad Information, Frustrating Both US Marines and Afghan Villagers
For weeks, US forces hunted Hazrat Jamal. They came to his house in Sawai and bothered villagers, but he was about a half-hour away in Khost City selling cars. The Americans suspected he was tied to a recent bombing, one of a growing number in this unstable...
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Summers and the Arrogant Bandwagon
Earlier this month, Harvard University president Lawrence Summers suggested that male-female differences in math and science achievement might have biological causes. Angry professors in his audience walked out, alumni threatened to withhold donations,...
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The Many Faces of the Baby Boomers ; Often Pictured as a Huge Monolith, the Baby-Boom Generation Is Actually Quite Diverse
Jerry Benston is in his mid-50s, African- American, and a baby boomer. While in college in Oshkosh, Wis., in 1968, he participated in a protest to make his university more culturally diverse. He counts himself among those boomers who helped to raise...
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The Rise of Israel's Pious Warriors ; Some Rabbis Say Soldiers Should Ignore Orders to Evacuate Gaza
Inside a stone citadel atop a panoramic hilltop, prospective Israeli soldiers at the Beit Yatir religious military prep school consult the Talmud on whether they should follow orders to evacuate settlements in the Gaza Strip and the West Bank."In the...
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These Israeli 'Agents' Have a Nose for Explosives
At 8:30 on a crisp January morning, Erez Finkelstein pulls up at Tel Aviv's central bus station. He takes two containers from his pocket. "This one's TNT, dynamite," he says as he shakes the small can, "and the other's C4, plastic explosive." He approaches...
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This Train Traces the Route of Black Migration North
The South Side of Chicago may not seem the likeliest place to begin a journey on the train they call the City of New Orleans. But for this trip, it is the best place.It is here that he stands atop a mound of shoe soles at Martin Luther King Drive and...
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This Year's Oscar Nominations: Biopics, Boxing, and a Close-Fought Rivalry
This year, the Academy Awards has something it hasn't had in ages: A neck-and-neck race for Best Picture.The nominations for the 77th annual Oscar ceremony, announced Tuesday morning, pitted "Million Dollar Baby," a boxing movie with a third-act plot...
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Uncle Tom Was a Real Person; His Cabin Is in Canada
'When my feet first touched the Canada shore, I threw myself on the ground, rolled in the sand, seized handfuls of it and kissed them and danced around, till, in the eyes of several who were present, I passed for a madman.'- Josiah HensonHarriet Beecher...
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When a Crisis Hits ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
From household and family emergencies to tragedies that affect an entire population, almost everyone has had to face a crisis of some kind.In any case, prayer brings a sense of God's loving presence and intelligent control. Both children and parents,...
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Why Florida Is No. 1 in Bioterror Readiness ; the State Has Fine-Tuned a Distribution Network for Vaccines, Notification Procedures, and Large-Scale Aid
The sight of FBI agents in moon suits swarming over an anthrax- contaminated building barely a month after the September 2001 terrorist attacks struck fear into the heart of nearly every Floridian.The contamination at the American Media building in Boca...
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Will Rising Baloch Nationalism Undermine Pakistan's War on Terror? ; Unrest Continued Monday as Two Bombs Detonated in Balochistan Province
Recent clashes between ethnic militants and security forces in southwestern Balochistan Province poses a new challenge to Pakistan's central government, which is already engaged in battles with Al Qaeda and its tribal supporters along the country's northwest...
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